Selected Tag

marina serper

All Tags 89



Learning How Behavioral Economics Impacts Health Decisions

    • Quit Smoking
    • senior couple on walk
    • laptop computer
    • Seated Exercise
    • Ladies Swimming
  • Previous
  • Next

Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics Research

CHIBE researchers apply concepts from the field of behavioral economics to design, implement, and evaluate interventions that improve health and build knowledge about efficacy, cost and effectiveness. 

Basic Science Core Request for Applications

The Basic Science Core aims to support laboratory or low-cost field studies that will shed light on mechanisms that can generate behavior change.  In contrast to previous large-scale field studies, which have often combined multiple mechanisms into one intervention in order to maximize impact on behavior, basic science projects supported by the Core focus on disentangling and precisely identifying the impacts of individual mechanisms.  CHIBE researchers interested in applying for project support can click here for more information.

 

 

Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics Research Studies

You are viewing 2 posts with the tag marina serper

Way to Cure: Developing Effective Strategies to Promote Adherence to Hepatitis C Therapy among Older Adults

Principal Investigator: Marina Serper, MD

Hepatitis C (HCV) treatment has been revolutionized by the advent of highly effective, but extremely costly drug regimens. Data from clinical trials show >90% cure rates, however, medication adherence and real world cure rates are not known. This research project will test the efficacy of tailored reminders vs. financial incentives compared to usual care to promote medication adherence among a diverse sample of Hepatitis C patients at risk for medication non-adherence, and will determine specific patient characteristics (age, cognitive function) that are associated with medication non-adherence after adjustment by intervention arm. 

Funder: NIA/NIH  


Project LIFT: Lifestyle intervention to promote fitness in transplantation

Principal Investigators: Marina Serper, MD, MS; Iwan Barankay, PhD; Peter Reese, MD

Objectives: 1) To determine whether use of an accelerometer device (Misfit tracker) and financial loss-incentives paired with health trivia information vs. the accelerometer use alone increases walking among kidney and liver transplant recipients, and 2) To evaluate whether the interventions are associated with lower weight and changes in body fat composition.

Funder: CTSA UL1TR000003 from the National Center for Advancing Translational Science