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Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics Research

CHIBE researchers apply concepts from the field of behavioral economics to design, implement, and evaluate interventions that improve health and build knowledge about efficacy, cost and effectiveness. 

Basic Science Core Request for Applications

The Basic Science Core aims to support laboratory or low-cost field studies that will shed light on mechanisms that can generate behavior change.  In contrast to previous large-scale field studies, which have often combined multiple mechanisms into one intervention in order to maximize impact on behavior, basic science projects supported by the Core focus on disentangling and precisely identifying the impacts of individual mechanisms.  CHIBE researchers interested in applying for project support can click here for more information.

 

 

Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics Research Studies

You are viewing 7 posts with the tag Mitesh Patel

iDiabetes: Influencing DIabetics to Adapt Behaviors related to Exercise and weighT by Enhancing Social incentives

Principal Investigator: Mitesh Patel, MD, MBA, MS

The objective of this study is to use a randomized, controlled trial to test the effectiveness of three interventions using social incentives and gamification to promote physical activity, weight loss, and improved glycemic control among adult type 2 diabetics.  

Funder: Doris Duke Foundation

Tags: Mitesh Patel

Evaluating Connected Health Approaches to Improve the Health of Veterans

Principal Investigator: Mitesh Patel, MD, MBA, MS

Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of hospitalization, morbidity, and mortality among veterans.  Many of the contributing risk factors are health behaviors that occur outside of the health care system and within their everyday lives of veterans such as physical activity, obesity, smoking, and medication adherence.  Connected health is a model for using mobile technologies to remotely monitor health outcomes and deploy interventions to change behavior. 

Research objectives:  1) Understand veterans’ perspectives of needs, barriers, and opportunities with connected health devices; 2) Evaluate veteran’s experiences with Way to Health, a technology platform already being used at the CMCVAMC in Philadelphia to integrate connected health devices and enable automated deployment of behavioral economic interventions; 3) Use Way to Health to test social and financial incentive-based connected health approaches to increase physical activity among veterans to inform an investigator-initiated research proposal.

Funder: Veterans Affairs Health Services Research and Development Career Development Award

 

	




         
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The Role of Behavioral Economic Incentive Design and Demographic Characteristics in Financial-Incentive Based Approaches to Changing Health Behaviors

Prinicpal Investigators: Nancy Haff, Mitesh Patel, Kevin Volpp

Financial incentives are increasingly being used to promote health behavior change.  The role of participant demographic characteristics and incentive structure has not been well studied.  In this meta-analysis, participant-level data was pooled from previously published studies using financial incentives to promote health behavior change and associations between the effectiveness of financial incentives, demographic characteristics, and incentive structure were evaluated.


Using Smartphones to Track Health Data: A Qualitative Analysis

Principal Investigator: Mitesh Patel

Smartphones and wearable devices are increasingly being used by individuals to track health data such as physical activity.  In this study, over 1000 participants who used a smartphone to track step counts for three months were asked to report their perceptions on using these devices to track health data.

Funder: NIH Institute on Aging

 

Tags: Mitesh Patel

Team-Based Approaches for Physical Activity to Compare Social Norms Feedback With and Without Forgiveness: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

Principal Investigators: Mitesh Patel, David Asch, Kevin Volpp

Increased physical activity has been found to be associated with lower rates of all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and stroke.  Yet, more than 50% of adults in the United States do not meet the national guidelines for minimum levels of physical activity to achieve health benefits.  This randomized, controlled trial enrolled teams of four members each who were given the goal of walking at least 7,000 steps per day.  Each team received different types of social norms feedback on their performance and outcomes were compared for groups that received feedback that accounted for all seven days of the week or forgave the two lowest days of activity, counting only 5 of 7 days per week.

Funder: NIH Institute on Aging


 


Team-Based Approaches for Physical Activity Using Financial Incentives and Social Norms Feedback: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

Principal Investigators: Mitesh Patel, David Asch, Kevin Volpp

Increased physical activity has been found to be associated with lower rates of all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and stroke.  Yet, more than 50% of adults in the United States do not meet the national guidelines for minimum levels of physical activity to achieve health benefits.  This randomized, controlled trial enrolled teams of four members each who were given the goal of walking at least 7,000 steps per day.  Each team received different types of social norms feedback on their performance and outcomes were compared with and without financial incentives.

Funder: NIH Institute on Aging

 


Evaluating Methods to Use Health Benefits Design to Encourage Employee Weight Loss

Principal Investigators: Kevin Volpp, Mitesh Patel

Employers are increasing looking for opportunities to encourage weight loss among employees. While studies have shown that financial incentives can effectively encourage weight loss, little is known about their use in health benefits design. The goal of this study is to determine whether a financial incentive program for obese University of Pennsylvania Health System employees can effectively encourage weight loss when compared to changes in health benefit design.

Funder: University of Pennsylvania Health System