Forbes: Can texting patients who are scheduled for colonoscopy reduce ‘no-shows’?

By | In the News

“Colorectal cancer screening is a vital part of providing care in any medical practice. The American Cancer Society (ACS) recommends that screening for colorectal cancer begin at age 45 in asymptomatic men and women, and every 10 years thereafter. Individuals at higher risk—those with a family history of colorectal cancer or polyps, history of ulcerative colitis or Crohns disease- should undergo screening earlier and more frequently. The May 2018 revision by the ACS—changing screening guidelines to age 45 as opposed to 50 in those at average risk—recommend continuing screening through age 75. They then recommend that those ages 76-85 engage…

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Way to Health, 10 Years On

By | CHIBEblog

By Frank Otto, Penn Medicine News “It came out of the Great Recession…” This line from the director of the Penn Center for Health Care Innovation, David Asch, MD, MBA, gives his signature product’s origin a mythical air, placing it at a time that was turbulent for the United States yet, ironically, a boon for health care innovation. Perhaps that’s fitting for Way to Health, an online platform designed to provide automated tech infrastructure not just for research projects, but also clinical care. In the same way that CAR T cell therapy has transformed cancer immunotherapy, Asch believes Way to…

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Inverse: Fitness Tracker Study Shows Why Paying People to Exercise Doesn’t Work

By | In the News

“Each day, millions of office workers are paid to sit at their desks all day. Now that we know sedentary life is linked to harmful health consequences, some scientists are coming up with creative incentives to improve people’s health. For instance, What if we actually paid people to be active? It turns out you can pay people to take slightly more steps each day, going by the results of a study published Friday in JAMA Open Network. Overall, people who received a constant payout of $.00020 per step (which works out to 50 cents for every 10,000 steps) walked an…

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NPR: Fresh Starts, Guilty Pleasures And Other Pro Tips For Sticking To Good Habits

By | In the News

“Katy Milkman played tennis at Princeton, and when she finished college, she went to the gym every day. But when she started grad school, her fitness routine went south. ‘At the end of a long day of classes, I was exhausted,’ Milkman says. ‘Frankly, the last thing I wanted to do was drag myself to the gym. What I really wanted to do was watch TV or read Harry Potter.’ But Milkman, who went on to study human behavior and decision-making, found a way to have her exercise and her Harry Potter, too: She resolved to only indulge her love…

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Knowledge@Wharton High School: Tackling Texting While Driving: ‘The Decision to Reach for That Phone Can Be Impulsive’

By | In the News

Kit Delgado, an emergency room physician who’s also an assistant professor at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, gets that it’s hard to keep your hands off your phone. He sees it all the time in patients who come into his ER, like the college student who was heading down the highway to pick up his girlfriend when he heard his phone ding. He picked it up, dropped it on the floorboard, reached down to get it and crashed into the guardrail. “You talk to any teenager in the country, and they’ve been beaten over the…

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WFPL: Study: 48K Kentuckians At Risk Of Losing Medicaid Under Bevin Work Requirements

By | In the News

The study was conducted in part by Atheendar Venkataramani, who’s on the team from the University of Pennsylvania that will analyze real-time data if the Medicaid changes take effect. He said there’s mixed research on whether work requirements in other welfare programs reduce poverty rates and get people into better-paying jobs. But there’s a lot of interest in how Kentucky’s program will impact enrollees. ‘It’s an open question in the Medicaid program as to whether it’ll achieve this specific objective or not,’ Venkatarmani said. They found a large portion would have been exempt because they were already working, were in…

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Managed Care Magazine: No Winks. But Penn ‘Nudges, Nudges’ Clinicians, Patients to Better Decisions

By | In the News

“Nudge units help redesign ‘choice architecture’—the way choices are presented—to make the sensible choice also the easy, likely one. Mitesh S. Patel, MD, an assistant professor of medicine and health care management at the University of Pennsylvania, heads the Penn Medicine Nudge Unit, the first such entity embedded in a U.S. health system. Pretty soon, he believes, no self-respecting health system will be without one. When Patel and his colleagues pitched the idea for a health system nudge unit to top management at Penn Medicine, the response was enthusiastic. And no wonder. Penn is a leader in applying behavioral economics…

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