NPR: Climate Change Risks and Insurance Policies

By In the News

From NPR: Last week, President Biden scolded insurers after reports surfaced that some providers would not cover the claims of people who chose to evacuate ahead of the storm but were not mandated to do so. The companies changed their tune, but only after being called out by the president. Meanwhile, in California, some property owners are reporting being dropped by their insurance as companies expand the areas they consider too vulnerable to wildfires. We wanted to hear more about the role of insurance companies not just in the aftermath of disasters, but also rebuilding and planning ahead to a…

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WSJ: Fighting Crime with Home Renovations

By In the News

From The Wall Street Journal: Published last month in the Journal of the American Medical Association’s Open Network, the study explored the relationship between home improvement grants and street crime in Philadelphia. It found a tight link between municipally funded house repairs and a drop in crime on those blocks with a city-funded overhauled home. The streets of many of Philadelphia’s older neighborhoods are lined with graceful, colorfully painted Victorian row houses. But with more than 23% of the city’s residents living in poverty, many of these architectural gems have been showing the wear-and-tear of neglect for decades. Since 1995…

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The Atlantic: Masks are Back, Maybe for the Long Term

By In the News

From The Atlantic: It certainly feels like we’ve been here before. Nationally, coronavirus case numbers are the highest they’ve been since the start of 2021. Hospitalization rates are on a roaring upswing in nearly every state. Young kids—many of them still ineligible for immunization—are gearing up for another pandemic school year. And even while SARS-CoV-2 continues to shape-shift, we’re struggling to get more shots into arms. The summer is starting to feel a lot like the long, hard winter many people were sure they’d left behind. Last week, the CDC played what probably seemed like one of the most obvious cards left in…

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Dr. Rinad Beidas Named New Director of the Penn Medicine Nudge Unit

By CHIBEblog

Congratulations to Rinad Beidas, PhD, on her appointment as the new director of the Penn Medicine Nudge Unit. The Penn Medicine Nudge Unit is the world’s first behavioral design team embedded within a health system leveraging insights from behavioral science to design and test approaches to make it easier for clinicians to make the right decisions toward better quality care and improved outcomes. It was launched in 2016 as a joint collaboration between the Penn Medicine Center for Health Care Innovation and Penn’s Center for Health Incentives & Behavioral Economics (CHIBE) and was led by founding director Mitesh Patel, MD,…

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KSL TV: Gephardt: Prices Out The Cost Of Convenience

By In the News

From KSL: Is trading time to save money always the right trade-off? “It’s going to be a person-by-person decision,” said Eric VanEpps, an assistant professor at the University of Utah’s David Eccles School of Business, who teaches behavioral economics. Paying more for convenience to save time is not necessarily a bad thing, he told us. “We shouldn’t treat time as though it doesn’t have any value at all,” VanEpps said. “We should pay attention to the opportunity cost of our time.” Whether we buy pre-sliced veggies to shave time off meal prep, or swing by a coffee shop rather than…

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