Penn Today: Workplace wellness programs could improve if more personalized

By In the News

In a program that used three different types of behavioral nudges, personal and psychological characteristics are strongly tied to people’s progress—or lack thereof. The programs were intended to nudge them toward increased physical activity. “A one-size-fits-all approach to nudging new behaviors within wellness programs can have limited success,” says senior author Mitesh Patel, director of the Penn Medicine Nudge Unit. “We’ve shown that different forms of nudging can be effective, and in this latest study on this program, we’ve now demonstrated that matching nudges to the right behavior profiles can unlock their full potential.” Read more at Penn Today.

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Wired: Your Brain Prefers Happy Endings. That’s Not Always Smart

By In the News

In a study published Monday in The Journal of Neuroscience, Vestergaard and coauthor Wolfram Schultz show that participants prefer experiences with happy endings to experiences that became slightly less enjoyable towards the end. Based on fMRI imaging, they were able to suggest some of the mechanical underpinnings of this preference by showing that different parts of the brain preserve and process different pieces of information from the same experience. “The specific idea that we were interested in in this work is the disconnect between what people enjoy and what they want,” says Vestergaard. Although people may enjoy sunny beach vacations, if they don’t…

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EHR Intelligence: EHR Nudges Boost Statin Prescriptions, Streamline Workflow

By In the News

EHR nudges show promise in increasing prescription rates for patients with certain chronic illnesses, according to a study published in JAMA Cardiology. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine found a 4 percent increase in statin prescription rate following EHR nudge integration. “Active choice prompts are used commonly in electronic health records, but they often are not rigorously tested head-to-head against other approaches,” Mitesh Patel, MD, the director of Penn Medicine’s Nudge Unit, said in a statement. “By systematically testing these interventions we can build upon the approaches that do work and turn off the ones that don’t.” By implementing tools to reduce alert fatigue,…

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Docwire News: Pay-for-Performance Reimbursement Associated with Increased Prescription of Evidence-Based Cancer Drugs

By In the News

A pay-for-performance (P4P) program for cancer drug reimbursement was found to increase use of evidence-based drugs without significant changes to overall spending, according to a new study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Also known as “value-based purchasing”, P4P is a healthcare reimbursement model that offers financial incentives to providers for meeting specific performance measures. “We know that prescribing evidence-based cancer drugs is high-quality care and increases both the length and quality of life for patients with cancer,” said Justin E. Bekelman, MD, Director of the Penn Center for Cancer Care Innovation at the Abramson Cancer Center and a co-lead author of the study,…

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Newsmax: Computer ‘Nudge’ Caused Doctors to Prescribe Statins for Heart Patients

By In the News

Prescriptions of cholesterol-lowering statins for heart disease patients rose significantly when doctors were prompted to choose whether or not to order them, according to a new study. Doctors received either a “passive choice” or “active choice” notification. “Active choices” notified doctors to either accept or dismiss prescribing a certain dose of statins. Among doctors who received active nudges, there was a 4-percentage-point increase in optimal statin prescribing in patients with heart disease, according to the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine study. According to Dr. Mitesh Patel, director of the Penn Medicine Nudge Unit. “By systematically testing these interventions we…

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Physicians Weekly: Bribes Don’t Help Patients Stick with Statins

By In the News

Prescribed medication nonadherence is common — as many as half of those with chronic disease deviate from their prescription — which affects both health outcomes and costs. A 2017 CDC review of nonadherence outlined intentional and unintentional patient factors including complex regimens, financial issues, beliefs about medication and disease, and side effects, as well as provider factors, including limited coordination of care and ineffective communication. Adherence to statin therapy cannot be bought, a randomized clinical trial found. After 12 months, there were no significant differences in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) between patients who received financial incentives to take statins for 6 months and those who did not. Six-month…

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Slate: This Clever Technique Will Help You Lose Weight and Stay Fit

By In the News

Katy Milkman, a behavioral economist at the University of Pennsylvania and host of the podcast Choiceology, shares the science behind why we hold ourselves back from making real change and how we can engineer our way into healthier, happier lives. With the right set up, the most difficult things—like losing weight—may be easier and more enjoyable than we thought. Read more at Slate.

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