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CHIBE in the News

The Economist Asks: Can We Learn To Disagree Better?

By In the News

From The Economist Asks: IN A POLARISED world opportunities to disagree are plentiful – and frequently destructive. Host Anne McElvoy asks Adam Grant, an organisational psychologist and author of “Think Again”, why he thinks the key to arguing well is to be open-minded. They discuss whether social media erode reasoned argument, and the new breed of powerful political communicators. Plus, how does the psychology of resilience help those who are “languishing”? Listen to the podcast at The Economist asks.

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Kaiser Permanente Spotlight: Not All Adults Newly Diagnosed With Diabetes Equally Likely To Start Treatment

By In the News

From Kaiser Permanente Spotlight: For adults newly diagnosed with diabetes, getting blood sugar levels under control is the first goal. Guidelines recommend diabetes medications to help patients meet their target blood sugar range. Yet a new Kaiser Permanente study found that adults of certain racial and ethnic groups are less likely to start medication within the first year of diagnosis. “We know there are race and ethnic disparities in diabetes-related health outcomes and that many factors contribute to these differences,” said the study’s co-lead author Anjali Gopalan, MD, MS, a research scientist at the Division of Research and a senior physician with The Permanente Medical…

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The Report Card: Christina Brown and Heather Schofield on Cognitive Endurance

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From The Report Card: On this episode of The Report Card, Nat interviews Christina Brown and Heather Schofield, two of the authors of Cognitive Endurance as Human Capital. Nat, Christina, and Heather discuss what cognitive endurance is and why it’s important, PISA, an elaborate field experiment in India, disparities in American schools, shortening standardized tests, students in Pakistan, mazes and tangrams, what schools can do differently to build cognitive endurance in students, AP exams, long medical shifts, whether an extra year of schooling makes a difference for cognitive endurance, the ideal age to build cognitive endurance, and more. Christina Brown is a development economist who will be…

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New York Times: H.I.V. Infections Remain Persistently High, U.N. Reports

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From The New York Times: While the world’s attention was riveted on the Covid pandemic and the war in Ukraine, the fight against an older foe lost crucial ground: More than 1.5 million people became infected with H.I.V. last year, roughly three times the global target, the United Nations reported on Wednesday. Roughly 650,000 people died of AIDS in 2021, about one every minute, according to U.N.AIDS, the organization’s program on H.I.V. and AIDS. Progress against the disease has faltered, and global infections have held steady since 2018. The toll in 2021 was uneven, as people ages 15 to 24 years…

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Penn Medicine News: Low Effort, High Reward — How Making Choices Easy Pays Off in Clinical Trials

By In the News

From Penn Medicine News: “We thought there would be a relatively small effect. But we knew that an effect of that size would save lives.” That’s what Shivan Mehta, MD, associate chief innovation officer at Penn Medicine and an assistant professor of Medicine in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, thought heading into a trial aimed at improving colorectal cancer screenings in a historically under-served community. The idea was to make the screenings as simple as possible for patients at a local community health center that primarily served people of color — through mailing fecal immunochemical test (FIT) kits…

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USA Today: How Will the Obesity Epidemic End? With Kids.

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From USA Today: Each of the children in Betty McNear’s home day care has a paper cup with their name neatly written on it and a green bean or pepper plant sprouting inside. The preschoolers help set the lunch table and clean up afterward, eating a “rainbow” of foods in between. They study their colors with tomatoes and blueberries and learn to share by preparing a meal to feed everyone. McNear’s approach at My Nana Too, a family child care center she owns and runs in Garfield Heights, Ohio, is more than an academic exercise. It’s also a bulwark against obesity and the…

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AJMC: ASCO Spotlight With Ravi B. Parikh, MD, MPP: Can Nudges Increase the Number of Serious Illness Conversations in Community Oncology?

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From AJMC: Getting oncologists to speak with patients about their care goals at the start of treatment has been a mission of the quality care movement for years. But matching this with the reality of busy clinic schedules has been a challenge, especially among community oncologists, who typically see more patients than their counterparts in academic medicine. Yet if conversations about serious illness (SI) or end-of-life (EOL) care are to translate into hospice referrals—or fewer costly, toxic late treatments that won’t work—community practice is where they must happen, according to Ravi B. Parikh, MD, MPP, an assistant professor in the Department…

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CNN: You’re Not the Only One Who’s Confused About the Economy. The Experts Are Baffled, Too

By In the News

From CNN: The recovery wasn’t supposed to go like this. Wall Street and Main Street alike are suffering from whiplash when it comes to the current state of the US economy. In their roles as consumers, investors and members of the workforce, ordinary Americans have the sense that the country is at an economic inflection point, but without a clear picture of what happens next, nor how to prepare. Conventional wisdom is that a recession is characterized by two metrics moving in the opposite direction for a sustained period: Economic output falls, and unemployment rises. That’s not what’s happening now — not…

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CNN: The 4-Ingredient Recipe for Getting Things Done

By In the News

From CNN: Most of us make to-do lists to keep track of all the things we need to tackle around the house, to keep our families running and to stay on top of tasks at work. But those lists can get unwieldy. If you often find it hard to check everything off your list despite the best of intentions, welcome to the club. Ayelet Fishbach, professor at the University of Chicago’s Booth School of Business, has been studying the science of motivation for her entire career, and she knows just what it takes to achieve more. Fishbach is the past president…

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