CHIBE in the News

CNBC: Experts seriously doubt whether patent waivers on Covid-19 vaccines will ever come to be

By In the News

From CNBC: It’s been well over a year since a landmark proposal brought the issue of patent waiver for the mRNA Covid vaccine to the spotlight. But many observers don’t see that waiving the intellectual property (IP) rights on Covid vaccines is an effective way to put a stop to the pandemic. Supporters of patent waivers like Harsha Thirumurthy, associate professor of medical ethics and health policy at the University of Pennsylvania, argue the issue lies at the heart of the reason why vaccines are less accessible in lower-income countries. “It limits how much manufacturing there can be of that product or…

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The Wall Street Journal: People Want to Start Spending Again and Inflation Is Ruining It

By In the News

From The Wall Street Journal: The unending pandemic has millions of people feeling like their lives are on hold. Many of them feel their financial growth is on hold, too. Americans began hoarding money in the early days of Covid-19. They were worried about their health, their jobs and the prospect of a deep recession that never really came. As the pandemic dragged on, some kept their accounts in a protective crouch and amassed record savings levels, while others started spending. People tend to think that money is the primary barrier to getting the perfect house or car, said George…

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The Atlantic: America’s COVID-19 Rules are a Dumpster Fire

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From The Atlantic: On Tuesday, the CDC officially dropped the detailed, 1,800-word version of its new isolation guidance for people who have been infected by the coronavirus. If you’re overwhelmed, you’re not the only one. In the week and a half since the CDC said that it was planning to update its isolation guidance, I’ve heard almost exclusively harsh reactions from experts, who have criticized the recommendations as convoluted, wishy-washy, and even unscientific. But several experts told me they suspected that certain logistical hurdles might have factored in. A vaccination clause, for example, would have added yet more complexity. Not all vaccinated people will…

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Well and Good: Refusing to Get Vaccinated Can Cost You (and Your Family) Thousands of Dollars

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From Well and Good: Over the summer of 2021, Philadelphia ran the Philly Vax Sweepstakes—a lottery designed to incentivize Philly residents to get the COVID-19 vaccine. The lottery targeted Philadelphia’s most unvaccinated populations, giving people who lived in zip codes with low vaccination rates greater odds of winning up to $50,000. As of July 2021, at least 14 other states, including Ohio, Colorado, Kentucky, and Louisiana, ran vaccine lotteries, giving people huge incentives to get vaccinated. By law, health insurance companies cannot add charges to your premium because you’re unvaccinated, says Kosali Simon, PhD, a health economics and policy professor at Indiana University….

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Insider: An ER doc says separate COVID-19 clinics should be set up to allow overstretched ERs to focus only on emergency cases

By In the News

From Insider: An ER doctor has suggested that US healthcare systems need to be smarter with adapting to the Omicron wave of COVID-19 infections, with one solution being to re-direct milder cases of COVID-19 out of the emergency rooms so doctors can focus on those who need urgent care. Mucio Kit Delgado, an ER doctor and assistant professor of emergency medicine at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, posted several ideas on how the country’s stressed healthcare systems can deal with COVID-19. In a Twitter thread posted on January 3, Delgado said that the Omicron variant is “crazy contagious,” observing that health…

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Philly Voice: In a time of uncertainty, a healthy lifestyle is a dependable benefit

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From The Philly Voice:  When it comes to your health, it’s hard to focus on anything outside of the most dominant health event in our lifetime. COVID-19 is responsible for more than 800,000 deaths, suffering and an enormous disruption to our lives. Even the vaccines have been a trigger for debate. And, with the entry of the omicron variant, it is difficult to know where we’ll be this time next year. With all this uncertainty, what remains constant is the value proposition of a healthy lifestyle. It can go a long way to stemming the impact of COVID-19 and, more generally, the…

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The Philadelphia Inquirer: Steps to take to stop smoking or vaping this year

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From The Philadelphia Inquirer: If you added “quit smoking” to your New Year’s resolution list, the first step in achieving this goal is to see the change as a process, or series of steps, rather than as a switch that gets flipped. First, it’s important to recognize that in order to change the smoking/vaping behavior for the long term, the underlying compulsion to inhale nicotine needs to be controlled. This impulse originates in the survival instinct parts of the brain, where nicotine acts like an imposter safety signal. It’s why using nicotine products can help to “relax” us, and why…

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Philly Voice: Encouraging use of buprenorphine in emergency departments improves opioid use disorder care, study finds

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From Philly Voice: A program designed by researchers from the University of Pennsylvania to encourage the use of buprenorphine significantly increased its use in emergency departments, a new study finds. Buprenorphine – a drug that can help people overcome opioid addiction – stabilizes withdrawal and reduces cravings. Research has shown that not only does it help people with opioid use disorder stay in treatment, but it also reduces overdose deaths and other associated complications. However, the researchers found that not all doctors authorized to administer the drug did so. Some gave it to 61% of their patients with opioid use disorders, while others…

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mmHealth Intelligence: Penn Gets $20M to Study Role of Remote Patient Monitoring for Alzheimer’s

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From mmHealth Intelligence: Researchers from Philadelphia-based University of Pennsylvania have received a grant from the National Institute on Aging (NIA) that will help further their research about the use of remote patient monitoring to improve at-home care for individuals living with Alzheimer’s disease and older adults. “Penn is uniquely poised to serve as a research and innovation accelerator based on our expertise in geriatric medicine, aging, Alzheimer’s disease, and biomedical informatics,” Karlawish stated in the press release. “We aim to advance the development of effective solutions that will be used in the real world and ultimately improve the lives of older adults…

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Penn Today: In Peru and the U.S., considering the factors that drive public health

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From Penn Today: Peru has the highest per capita COVID-19 death rate in the world, twice that of the United States. In the U.S., despite abundant availability of vaccines that could have driven that rate even lower, vaccine hesitancy, fueled in part by misinformation spread on social media, has kept millions from receiving the shots. Rather than learning about these issues at an academic level of remove, the course format put experts and students from each country into conversation. Their on-the-ground experiences lent the course discussions both authority and up-to-the-minute relevance for the students, many of whom are or soon…

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