CHIBE in the News

KUOW: Start Fresh: 6 Tips For Mental Health In 2020

By | In the News

“Milkman, now a professor at the Wharton School of Business who specializes in human decision-making, says that when it comes to making a behavioral change, the trick is to pair the thing you dread with something you love. Looking for more tips like these to make your New Year’s resolution stick? Whatever your goals, we have insights that can make it a little easier for you to achieve them. Here are six “life recipes” for good mental health from research that NPR reporters covered this year” Read more at KUOW

Read More

New York Times: Opioid Deaths Rise When Auto Plants Close, Study Shows

By | In the News

“The last two decades have brought both a sharp decline in automaking jobs in the United States and the rise of a deadly epidemic of opioid abuse. According to a new study, the two trends may well be related. The study, published Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine, found that opioid deaths were about 85 percent higher among people of prime working age in counties where automotive assembly plants had closed five years earlier, compared with counties where such factories remained open.” Read more at The New York Times, The Atlantic, AJMC, Pain News Network, Reuters, Redmond Register Health, Crain’s Cleveland Business,…

Read More

The Ladders: The Ecological Benefit Of Giving Advice

By | In the News

“When a friend or colleague asks you for advice, you might find yourself as anxious about your response as you are humbled by the gesture. It is no surprise then, that when the recipient appears to respond positively to your words of wisdom you’re jolted with a current of self-assurance. As you should be! That colleague or friend deemed you knowledgeable enough to provide material counsel and you were knowledgeable enough to oblige. New research published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences illustrates this effect by using academic outcomes as a model. The paper was co-authored by Wharton post-doc Lauren Eskreis-Winkler, Wharton professors Katherine Milkman…

Read More

WSJ: Want to Reach Your Savings Goal in 2020? Here’s What the Research Says Will Help

By | In the News

From WSJ: Whether it’s retirement or a down payment, New Year’s is one of the best times to make a financial plan, behavioral economists say. Here are some of their tips and strategies. New Year’s is when many people feel motivated to make a savings or financial plan, and research shows that it’s a good time to do so. A recent survey from Fidelity Investments found that 67% of Americans are considering a New Year’s resolution that relates to their finances. More than half of the 3,012 respondents said they want to save more for goals including retirement. But success…

Read More

Penn Medicine: Keeping ‘Nudges’ On Track

By | In the News

From Penn Medicine News: Mitesh Patel, MD, MBA, MS, an assistant professor of Medicine, is the founding director of Penn Medicine’s Nudge Unit. He’s been implementing nudges for years, starting with the one that increased the rate of generic prescriptions. And while he’s had eye-opening success, he’s just as careful with every new nudge as he was with the first. “We’re nudging clinicians and patients in a healthier direction by making relatively small changes to their environment,” Patel said. “What we’re doing is subtle and often much more effective than a ‘shove,’ but, because of how effective they are, we…

Read More

Philly Mag: Here’s Everything You Need to Know About Cancer Screening

By | In the News

“According to the American Cancer Society, screening rates for colorectal, breast, and cervical cancer are lower in Philadelphia than in other areas of Pennsylvania, while 25 percent of the city’s residents live below the poverty line with decreased access to care and higher rates of illness and death. “Philly does have several areas where we could definitely increase cancer screening rates and thereby avoid many cancers. And not only avoid them, but if we do diagnose them, we’d be able to diagnose them at an earlier stage,” said Carmen Guerra, the American Cancer Society’s board scientific officer.” Read more at Philadelphia Magazine

Read More

Money on the Mind: Interview with George Loewenstein

By | In the News

“Behavioural Economics is a rapidly expanding field and everyday new research is being developed in academia, tested and implemented by practitioners in financial organisation, development agencies, government ‘nudge’ units and more. This interview is part of a series interviewing prominent people in the field. And in today’s interview the answers are provided by George Loewenstein.” Read more at Money on the Mind

Read More

ABC News: ‘Tis the season to shop for health insurance. Here’s your checklist

By | In the News

“It’s open enrollment — time to pick next year’s insurance — for folks who buy it on their own and for many of us in our jobs. Lots of us aren’t sure we know how to pick, and research shows: We’re not wrong. A group of economists found that most people will not make the best choice among the plans in front of them. And it’s not just average people who have trouble. One of the economists who did that research — George Loewenstein of Carnegie-Mellon University — told me he was personally dreading the process of helping his adult…

Read More

Health Data Management: EHR Nudges Boost Cancer Screening Orders, Streamline Workflow

By | In the News

“The University of Pennsylvania Health System programmed a best-practice alert into its electronic health record to automatically prompt medical assistants to either accept or decline a cancer screening order. The EHR “nudge” implemented at three different Penn primary care practices resulted in a 22 percent increase in screening order rates for breast cancer, compared with practices without the alert. In addition, the colorectal cancer order rate rose by almost 14 percent vs. the other practices.” Read more at HealthDataManagement, EHR Intelligence, Radiology Business

Read More

Knowledge@Wharton: Want Better Forecasting? Silence the Noise

By | In the News

“Noise is a very different type of creature. It is not systematic. In fact, it is an error that randomly increases or decreases my predictions. For instance, one of my predictions may become randomly too high. For another event, it might suddenly become too low. The idea here is that no matter how much we know about the forecaster, it is impossible for us to predict the exact direction and magnitude of noise. This also introduces variability in the predictions. This variability is not based on any actual relevant information about the outcome. Therefore, it is not useful and does…

Read More