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LA Times: Medical bias can be deadly. Our research found a way to curb it.

By In the News

From The LA Times: Ask most any woman about her experience with the American healthcare system and you will likely hear stories of medical maltreatment in the form of dismissal, undertreatment or incorrect diagnosis. Add racial bias to the mix and a woman’s likelihood of being victimized in medicine is even worse In a study published this month in the journal Nature Communications, my colleagues and I discovered a surprisingly effective answer: an online group reasoning technique known as networked collective intelligence, which basically means getting doctors to exchange treatment options with one another. Think of it as a group chat for specialists. We asked more than…

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WebMD Health News: Leaked Documents Show Facebook Put Profit Before Public Good

By In the News

From WebMD Health News: A leaked trove of papers from inside Facebook shows that the social media giant’s internal research uncovered a host of problems on the platform related to public health and other issues, but did virtually nothing about it. The files were leaked by a whistleblower, former Facebook employee Frances Haugen, who shared tens of thousands of documents with the Securities and Exchange Commission, Congress, and a consortium of news organizations. She has since testified before the Senate Commerce Subcommittee on Consumer Protection and European lawmakers. “Large organizations that have influence and access to lots of people need…

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Health Leaders: Yelp Ratings of Healthcare Facilities May Reveal Death Rate Disparities

By In the News

From Health Leaders: U.S. counties with healthcare facilities with the greatest share of 1-star Yelp reviews had the highest death rates, and a difference of just one point—roughly one star—between counties’ average scores could indicate a mortality rate that is better or worse by dozens of lives, according to researchers at the Penn Medicine Center for Digital Health. Yelp is a review website that uses a five-star rating system to evaluate businesses, with one start rating the lowest and five stars rating the highest. “Many of the facilities that provide essential care may not otherwise have standardized measures or approaches…

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Penn Researchers Awarded Nearly $10 Million to Study Health Effects of Investment in Black Neighborhoods to Address Structural Racism

By CHIBEblog

A research team led by CHIBE-affiliated faculty members and PIs Eugenia South, MD, MS, and Atheendar Venkataramani, MD, PhD, MPhil, has been awarded nearly $10 million from the NIH to conduct a randomized controlled trial of concentrated investment in Black neighborhoods in Philadelphia to address structural racism as a fundamental cause of poor health. Previous research in Philadelphia has shown that life expectancy for people living in poor, predominantly Black neighborhoods, such as around Strawberry Mansion, is 20 years lower than for people living in the nearby affluent, predominantly White neighborhoods of Old City and Society Hill in the City….

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The Medical Progress: Study to assess the impact of a multi-component intervention in reducing racial health disparities

By In the News

From the Medical Progress: In an unprecedented effort to address the harmful effects of structural racism on health, 60 predominantly Black neighborhoods in Philadelphia will be part of an ambitious study to assess the impact of a multi-component intervention addressing both environmental and economic injustice on health and well-being, led by Penn Medicine researchers Eugenia C. South, MD, MHSP, and Atheendar Venkataramani, MD, PhD. At the community level, the study includes tree planting, vacant lot greening, trash cleanup, and rehabilitation of dilapidated, abandoned houses. For households, the study will help connect participants to local, state, and federal social and economic…

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Penn Medicine-Led Research Team Awarded $2.9 Million to Study Heart Disease and Cancer in Black and Hispanic Communities

By In the News

From Philly Voice: Scientists from the University of Pennsylvania will lead a nationwide effort to learn more about why cancer patients and survivors from Black and Hispanic communities are more susceptible to developing heart disease — and how to address that disparity. Penn Medicine on Monday announced that its Cardio-Oncology Translational Center of Excellence was awarded $2.9 million from the American Heart Association to fund the project, which will be carried out over the next four years by 30 researchers around the country. With a scarcity of evidence in cardio-oncology, the team hopes to “define how the sociologic construct of…

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