CHIBEblog

Payment, Lying, and Research Eligibility

By | CHIBEblog

Payment for research participation can raise ethical concerns and legal issues. But it can also raise scientific problems if it causes participants to lie about their eligibility or other things, like adverse events. In our new study in JAMA Network Open, my colleagues and I wanted to see whether payment causes deception about study eligibility, and if so, whether more payment results in more deception. We found the answer to the first question was yes – but contrary to what one might expect, payment amount didn’t matter. It’s hard to study if people are lying, for obvious reasons. To get…

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Strengthening Medicaid Waiver Evaluations

By | CHIBEblog

States are considered “laboratories of democracy,” allowing experimentation with innovative reforms that could potentially be adopted at the national level. To test new approaches in their Medicaid programs, states have embraced Section 1115 waivers, which permit innovations that do not meet federal program rules, but still promote the program’s objectives. Recent proposals have included controversial, previously untested policies, foremost among them community engagement requirements, which mandate that nondisabled, nonpregnant adults participate in one or more of a wide range of activities – such as work, job search, volunteer activities, or school – to maintain Medicaid coverage. In a New England…

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Penn DC Forum Envisions The Future Of Bundled Payments

By | CHIBEblog

Just as Medicare launched its new voluntary bundled payment program, LDI Senior Fellows Amol Navathe, MD, PhD, and Ezekiel Emanuel, MD, PhD, hosted a forum in Washington, DC to discuss current evidence and best practices around payment transformation. The forum, Moving Forward with Bundled Payments, brought policymakers, policy advocates, researchers, health insurers, and health system leaders together to learn from each other’s experiences in implementing new payment models. (l) Amol Navathe, MD, PhD, is Co-Director of the Health Care Transformation Institute and Associate Director of Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics at Penn.(r) Ezekiel Emanuel, MD, PhD is Vice Provost for Global Initiatives,…

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CHOP Research Network: Novel Measures Of Cell Phone Use While Driving

By | CHIBEblog

  Cell phone use while driving is a serious problem for adolescent drivers, placing them at risk for injury and death. We know from previous research that adolescents are heavily reliant on their cell phones for communication and connectivity, and admit to using their cell phone while driving in self-report surveys. In addition, we know from studies that use video cameras in cars that adolescents use their phones while driving. My colleague and CIRP Senior Fellow Kit Delgado, MD, MS and I are particularly interested in how to measure behaviors related to cell phone use while driving, while staying on top of…

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The Evidence on Health Behavior Incentives in State Medicaid Programs

By | CHIBEblog

AcademyHealth Panel Rounds Up the Research As a number of states experiment with health incentives as an element of their Medicaid programs, researchers are analyzing the results with an eye towards informing future evidence-based policies. At this week’s AcademyHealth Annual Research Meeting, CHIBE affiliated faculty member Charlene Wong, MD led a panel in which investigators discussed the latest evidence on the impact of these incentives on healthy behaviors among Medicaid beneficiaries. The panel began with a presentation by Rob Saunders, PhD of the Duke Margolis Center for Health Policy. Saunders and his colleagues, including Dr. Wong, recently authored an issue…

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NEJM Catalyst: Moving from a Sickness Model of Health Care to One of Well-Being — Part 2

By | CHIBEblog

Kevin Volpp, MD, PhD, interviews Karen DeSalvo, MD, MPH, Professor in the Departments of Internal Medicine and Population Health at Dell Medical School, and former Acting Assistant Secretary for Health in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Part 2 of a 2-part interview. Missed part 1? Catch up here. Kevin Volpp:  One other area I want to ask you about is related to tools, specifically technology and digital health. You’ve done a lot of work in that space, and I’m curious what you see as particularly promising ways to leverage technology and digital health, and traditional public health programs and…

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NEJM Catalyst: Moving from a Sickness Model of Health Care to One of Well-Being — Part 1

By | CHIBEblog

Kevin Volpp, MD, PhD, interviews Karen DeSalvo, MD, MPH, Professor in the Departments of Internal Medicine and Population Health at Dell Medical School, and former Acting Assistant Secretary for Health in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Part 1 of a 2-part interview. Part 2 continues here. Kevin Volpp:  Hi, this is Kevin Volpp. I am a professor at the University of Pennsylvania, and I’m joined today by Karen DeSalvo. Karen is a professor at the Dell Medical School at UT Austin and has had a very distinguished public health career. I’m pleased to have Karen join me today,…

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Adapting Way to Health for Research on Depression

By | CHIBEblog

Way to Health was purpose-built to help researchers address critical and complex problems facing healthcare and patient health by providing the tools needed to rigorously test solutions on one comprehensive digital platform. Mental illness qualifies as one of those challenges in need of fixing. It is estimated that 9.6 million American adults suffer from a serious mental illness (SMI), experiencing a diminished ability to function in daily life and a shorter life-expectancy. In addition to the patient burden, mental illness drains healthcare budgets as the third most expensive medical condition after heart conditions and traumatic injury. Way to Health will…

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