CHIBEblog

ideas42 Seminar Series: A Talk with Mitesh Patel

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ideas42’s network of academic affiliates represent some of the world’s foremost experts in behavioral science. With the ideas42 Affiliate Series, we invite leading scholars to share their insights and what inspires their exploration into human behavior. Our New York office was pleased to host Mitesh Patel of the University of Pennsylvania. Mitesh studies innovative ways to change health behaviors and improve outcomes by combining digital health approaches with engagement strategies that leverage insights from behavioral economics. He is also Director of the Penn Medicine Nudge Unit, where he leads an initiative within the health care system to systematically test ways to apply insights from…

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Change Behaviors For Good With Katherine Milkman

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Jean Chatsky, interviewer of HerMoney, speaks with Katherine Milkman, PhD,  to explain why changing our behaviors can be so difficult, and — best of all — how to finally make the changes we want for good. In Mailbag, we answer your questions on how to prioritize savings with credit card debt, what to do with old 403(b) accounts and how to handle those sometimes-pricey hobbies for kids. You can listen to the podcast here at PRX.

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When Push Comes to Nudge

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Imagine if health care costs could be dramatically reduced, and outcomes improved without any heavy lifting – no bills would need to be passed, no policies approved, and no major restructuring required. What if we could simply will people to make decisions that resulted in better care and a healthier population? “Decisions are affected by emotions, bias, social context. The solution is design,” David Asch, MD, MBA, executive director of Penn’s Center for Health Care Innovation, recently said at the Healthcare Financial Management Association’s annual conference. The idea that better decisions can be made simply by guiding people to them…

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Financial incentives improve adolescent glucose self-monitoring

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  Daily glucose monitoring is critical to achieving glycemic control, but many adolescents “fall off the cliff” as they transition from childhood to young adulthood and parents become less involved in diabetes care. In a new study presented at AcademyHealth’s 2017 Annual Research Meeting in New Orleans, Dr. Charlene Wong found that  daily loss-framed financial incentives improve adherence to daily glucose monitoring among adolescents and young adults with Type 1 Diabetes.  Dr. Wong describes the implications of her study in a video interview [above] at the Annual Research Meeting. This is one of the first studies to demonstrate that financial…

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Removing Legal Barriers to Advance Care Planning

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In a Perspective in the New England Journal of Medicine, Joshua Rolnick, a Penn National Clinician/VA Scholar, and LDI Senior Fellows David Asch and Scott Halpern suggest that an advance directive (AD) should be understood primarily as a clinical document, rather than a legal one. The authors argue that the existing legal framework around ADs – a document containing a designated health care decision maker, a living will, or both – creates several impediments to successful advance care planning and does little to prevent disputes over the care provided. The authors identify three major legal limitations to creating, updating, and…

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Meet the Behavioral Evidence Hub: Powerful Solutions for Problem-Solvers

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ideas42 is excited to join with Innovations for Poverty Action (IPA) and the Center for Health Incentives & Behavioral Economics at the University of Pennsylvania (CHIBE) in launching the Behavioral Evidence Hub, a comprehensive resource that brings together some of the world’s most promising innovative solutions into a single tool, putting them within easy reach of all those working to solve a wide range of intractable problems affecting the wellbeing and livelihood of people around the world. The website, BHub.org, includes evidence-based initiatives that offer deep insight into tough problems negatively impacting people in the U.S. and globally – from staying…

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Hardwiring Patient Engagement to Deliver Better Health

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Providers often throw up their hands in frustration when they see the same patients repeatedly readmitted to the hospital for behaviors such as failing to take their medications at home or eating a high salt diet when they have heart failure. Many acute exacerbations of chronic disease are from patients having trouble following through with provider recommendations — whether to eat healthy foods, watch fluid balance, take medications, lose weight, quit smoking, or avoid alcohol or other drugs. Generally, the standard approaches clinicians take to address these issues, such as cajoling or providing information in a brief face-to-face encounter, don’t…

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A/B Testing Health Behavior

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Medicine has been accused of implementing new interventions without a strong underlying evidence base, and that impulse for quick implementation is understandable, says Scott Halpern, Deputy Director for the University of Pennsylvania’s Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics. “We have sick people. We need to do something. We can’t sit idly by,” he says. “But I wonder if that instinct to not just stand there — to do something — might have some unintended consequences, crowding out the potential for greater innovation that has better evidence to support it.” What can we learn from other industries that have grappled…

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RWJF: How Behavioral Economics Can (and Can’t) Boost Health

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What the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation learned from a six-year exploration As the bestsellers started piling up, from 2008’s Predictably Irrational and Nudge to 2011’s Thinking Fast, Thinking Slow, the buzz around behavioral economics — the science and practice of nudging people toward a particular decision — could be heard from the classroom to the board room. Many dismissed it as a passing fad. Some balked at its paternalism. Others considered it “kinda creepy.” We at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation were cautiously optimistic. Could behavioral economics, a tool that has helped people save money, also help save people’s lives? Could its power be…

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