CHIBEblog

Wharton-Sirius Radio Previews Issues From Upcoming LDI 50th Anniversary Symposium

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The Department of Health and Human Services’ proposal to eliminate or scale back the Affordable Care Act’s “bundled payment” programs seems counter to early research findings that document the cost savings and improved outcomes achieved by those new payment models, according to University of Pennsylvania health services researcher Amol Navathe. Navathe, MD, PhD, was one of three Penn faculty members appearing on the Wharton/Sirius “Business of Health Care” radio show to discuss their own areas of research as a prelude to the upcoming two-day Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics 50th Anniversary “Shaping the Future of Health Care” Symposium. That event…

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Celebrating LDI’s 50th Anniversary

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Origins of the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics With a gift from Leonard and Sophie Davis, the University of Pennsylvania established the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics (LDI) in 1967, two years after Congress enacted Medicare. It was created to fill fundamental gaps in the evidence base that could inform policies critical to the financing and management of the nation’s increasingly costly and complex health care system. Today, LDI is considered one of the world’s leading university-based programs of its kind. LDI and its senior fellows are among the pioneers in interdisciplinary health services research and have helped guide…

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The 50-state Laboratory: How Can Behavioral Science Bolster Vaccination Policy?

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Vaccinating kids saves a lot of lives and a lot of dollars. High rates of vaccine coverage assure community protection (“herd immunity”), and in the United States we achieve this by requiring children to be fully vaccinated by the time they start school. Taken together, these requirements are often called the “immunization schedule.” We’ve mandated school-entry immunization for so long that it at times seems like a given, but many other countries don’t have similar mandates. They suffer from lower vaccine coverage and more disease. But what happens when parents in the U.S. don’t want their children to be vaccinated? All 50 states have…

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Closing the Scholarship-Policy Gap with Strategic Science

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This summer the Trump administration announced further delays in (1) implementing calorie labels on restaurant menus across the nation and (2) rolling out a new nutrition facts label. Both policies are designed to increase nutrition transparency and arm consumers with important health information when making decisions. This signals little interest from the current administration in promoting sound, common-sense nutrition policies. It also highlights a need, more than ever, for scientists to communicate with policymakers at the federal, state, and local levels, to encourage evidence-based policymaking. Most of the time, scientists generate their research questions based on what they think is interesting and important. This approach…

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The Complicated Issue of “See Something, Say Something” in Science

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Mobile phones and other connected devices are an increasingly common tools for researchers examining a range of medical and public health issues. Some, such as Bluetooth connected blood pressure cuffs or blood glucose monitors record and analyze information about medical conditions in the hopes of tracking patient outcomes over time and developing new interventions. Others, like such as personal breathalyzers and apps that use GPS and accelerometer sensors to track driving behavior, are working to cut down on the increasing number of fatalities and injuries caused by unsafe and often illegal driving behaviors. Mobile technology provides researchers with new cost-effective…

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TMSIDK: Behavior Change

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Tell Me Something I Don’t Know (TMSIDK) is live journalism wrapped in a game-show package and hosted by Stephen J. Dubner, co-author of the Freakonomics books and host of Freakonomics Radio. In this episode, CHIBE’s Kevin Volpp, Katherine Milkman, and Angela Duckworth are all featured discussing how to make behavior change stick. The episode can also be listened to at Tell Me Something I Don’t Know.

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ideas42 Seminar Series: A Talk with Mitesh Patel

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ideas42’s network of academic affiliates represent some of the world’s foremost experts in behavioral science. With the ideas42 Affiliate Series, we invite leading scholars to share their insights and what inspires their exploration into human behavior. Our New York office was pleased to host Mitesh Patel of the University of Pennsylvania. Mitesh studies innovative ways to change health behaviors and improve outcomes by combining digital health approaches with engagement strategies that leverage insights from behavioral economics. He is also Director of the Penn Medicine Nudge Unit, where he leads an initiative within the health care system to systematically test ways to apply insights from…

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Change Behaviors For Good With Katherine Milkman

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Jean Chatsky, interviewer of HerMoney, speaks with Katherine Milkman, PhD,  to explain why changing our behaviors can be so difficult, and — best of all — how to finally make the changes we want for good. In Mailbag, we answer your questions on how to prioritize savings with credit card debt, what to do with old 403(b) accounts and how to handle those sometimes-pricey hobbies for kids. You can listen to the podcast here at PRX.

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When Push Comes to Nudge

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Imagine if health care costs could be dramatically reduced, and outcomes improved without any heavy lifting – no bills would need to be passed, no policies approved, and no major restructuring required. What if we could simply will people to make decisions that resulted in better care and a healthier population? “Decisions are affected by emotions, bias, social context. The solution is design,” David Asch, MD, MBA, executive director of Penn’s Center for Health Care Innovation, recently said at the Healthcare Financial Management Association’s annual conference. The idea that better decisions can be made simply by guiding people to them…

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