In the News

LA Times: Medical bias can be deadly. Our research found a way to curb it.

By November 29, 2021December 13th, 2021No Comments

From The LA Times:

Ask most any woman about her experience with the American healthcare system and you will likely hear stories of medical maltreatment in the form of dismissal, undertreatment or incorrect diagnosis. Add racial bias to the mix and a woman’s likelihood of being victimized in medicine is even worse

In a study published this month in the journal Nature Communications, my colleagues and I discovered a surprisingly effective answer: an online group reasoning technique known as networked collective intelligence, which basically means getting doctors to exchange treatment options with one another. Think of it as a group chat for specialists.

We asked more than 800 practicing clinicians to provide treatment recommendations for either a white male or a Black female patient — portrayed by an actor in a video presentation — showing identical risk factors for cardiac disease. Initially, the Black female patient was over 200% more likely than the white male patient to be sent home rather than receive the guideline recommended care, which is referral to the emergency department.

Read the full story in the LA Times. 

News Mention

  • Damon Centola headshot

    Damon Centola, PhD

    Professor in the Annenberg School for Communication, the School of Arts and Sciences, and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Topics