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Mitesh Patel Archives - Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics

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Dr. Mitesh Patel to Join Ascension Health

By CHIBEblog

The Center for Health Incentives & Behavioral Economics (CHIBE) bittersweetly announces that Penn Medicine Nudge Unit Director and CHIBE Associate Director Mitesh Patel, MD, MBA, MS, will be moving on to a new position with Ascension Health in June. CHIBE has been lucky to call Dr. Patel a member of our community since 2012 when he first joined as a fellow in the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars Program. Since then, Dr. Patel has earned countless accolades, contributed incredible research with major real-world impact, and in 2016, he was named the inaugural Director of the Penn Medicine Nudge Unit,…

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Newsmax: Computer ‘Nudge’ Caused Doctors to Prescribe Statins for Heart Patients

By In the News

Prescriptions of cholesterol-lowering statins for heart disease patients rose significantly when doctors were prompted to choose whether or not to order them, according to a new study. Doctors received either a “passive choice” or “active choice” notification. “Active choices” notified doctors to either accept or dismiss prescribing a certain dose of statins. Among doctors who received active nudges, there was a 4-percentage-point increase in optimal statin prescribing in patients with heart disease, according to the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine study. According to Dr. Mitesh Patel, director of the Penn Medicine Nudge Unit. “By systematically testing these interventions we…

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Health Day: Computer ‘Nudge’ Spurs Doctors to Prescribe Statins to Heart Patients

By In the News

According to a University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine study, the use of “nudges” or notification in electronic health records by doctors increased prescriptions of cholesterol-lowering statins for heart disease patients. One was a “passive choice” notification to which doctors would navigate. The other was an “active choice” notification to prescribe a certain dose of statins that doctors needed to accept or dismiss. There was a 4 percentage point increase in optimal statin prescribing among doctors who received active nudges. “Active choice prompts are used commonly in electronic health records, but they often are not rigorously tested head-to-head against other…

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Yes or No: Forcing a Choice Increased Statin Prescribing for Heart Disease Patients

By In the News

“Active choice prompts are used commonly in electronic health records, but they often are not rigorously tested head-to-head against other approaches,” said the study’s senior author, Mitesh Patel, MD, the director of Penn Medicine’s Nudge Unit. “By systematically testing these interventions we can build upon the approaches that do work and turn off the ones that don’t.” In a clinical trial testing two different forms of “nudging,” statin prescriptions at the right dosages increased significantly among patients with heart disease when doctors had to actively choose whether or not to prescribe the medications, which are used to lower cholesterol. However, for patients…

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MedPage Today: EHR Nudges for Statin Prescribing: Not There Yet

By In the News

Based on recent findings, electronic health record-based clinical decision support (EHR CDS) alerts didn’t increase statin prescribing in a three-arm cluster-randomized trial. While statin prescribing at guideline-recommended doses increased from 41.2% to 44.5% among cardiologists randomized to 6 months of pop-up alerts requiring action, it was no better than controls receiving no intervention (from 41.8% to 42.6%). However, the active choice intervention did lead to significantly improved statin prescribing at the optimal dose for the subgroup of patients with clinical atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD), reported Mitesh Patel, MD, MBA, of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, and colleagues. The active…

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Team Wins 2 Grants from NIA to Look at Tailoring Nudges to Improve Vaccination and Cancer Screening

By CHIBEblog

A team involving several CHIBE members has won two grants from the National Institute on Aging to study nudges in cancer care and vaccination. Congratulations to the four investigators: Mitesh Patel, MD, MBA, a member of CHIBE’s leadership team and Director of the Penn Medicine Nudge Unit; Amol Navathe, MD, PhD, CHIBE Associate Director and Assistant Professor of Health Policy and Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine; Kristin Linn, PhD, CHIBE-affiliated faculty member and Assistant Professor of Biostatistics at Penn; and Joshua Liao, MD, MSc, Associate Professor of Medicine at University of Washington School of Medicine and an Adjunct Senior Fellow…

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Mitesh Patel Wins SGIM’s Quality and Practice Innovation Award

By CHIBEblog

Congratulations to Director of the Penn Medicine Nudge Unit Mitesh Patel, MD, MBA, MS, who has received the Society of General Internal Medicine (SGIM) Quality and Practice Innovation Award. This award recognizes “general internists and their organization that have successfully developed and implemented innovative role model systems of practice improvement in ambulatory and/or inpatient clinical practice,” according to a SGIM press release. Watch Dr. Patel’s acceptance video here. Dr. Patel, who is a member of CHIBE’s leadership team, was honored for improving care within the quality domains of the 2000 IOM Crossing the Quality Chasm report: “safety, effectiveness, patient-centeredness, timeliness,…

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NPR: Good Medical Care Can Suffer Late In The Day

By In the News

From NPR It could also be that more medically complex patients tend to schedule appointments in the afternoon, the researchers say. Or maybe doctors and patients both experience “decision fatigue” late in the day, which means it’s hard to make difficult decisions — like one about your health — when you’ve already been overloaded with a day’s worth of questions and problems at work or at home. “They’ve been making decisions the whole day,” says Dr. Mitesh Patel, a physician and health economist at the University of Pennsylvania, and the senior author of the cancer screening study. Patients “might say,…

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US News & World Report: Penn Med Finds Patients More Likely To Track Steps with Smartphones than Wearable Devices

By In the News

“Smartphones appear to be more effective than wearable fitness devices in helping doctors track patients’ physical activity, researchers say.” The study was conducted by Dr. Mitesh Patel, who discovered that the habit of carrying a smartphone makes tracking activity level more effective. His research was published in the JAMA Network Open Journal. Read more on U.S. News and World Report    

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Penn Today: Patients Stick with Smartphone Activity Trackers Longer than Wearable Devices

By In the News

“Six months after discharge, smartphone users were 32 percent more likely to continue sending health data to the research team than those using wearables.” “Most people with smartphones take them everywhere they go. Since carrying the phone is already a built-in habit, it makes it much easier to use the device to track activity levels,” says the study’s lead author, Mitesh Patel. Dr. Patel’s study was published in the JAMA Network Open journal. Read more at PennToday

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