KUOW: Start Fresh: 6 Tips For Mental Health In 2020

By | In the News

“Milkman, now a professor at the Wharton School of Business who specializes in human decision-making, says that when it comes to making a behavioral change, the trick is to pair the thing you dread with something you love. Looking for more tips like these to make your New Year’s resolution stick? Whatever your goals, we have insights that can make it a little easier for you to achieve them. Here are six “life recipes” for good mental health from research that NPR reporters covered this year” Read more at KUOW

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Medscape: California Tightens Scrutiny of Medical Vaccine Exemptions

By | In the News

In a paper in Health Affairs last year, Alison Buttenheim, PhD, MBA, from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing in Philadelphia, and coauthors concluded that California’s mandatory counseling approach worked. Increasing “the opportunity cost of vaccine exemptions” by requiring the signature of a healthcare provider did reduce these opt-outs, they wrote. Buttenheim told Medscape Medical News that clinicians face challenges in working with parents who have concerns about vaccines. This is only one topic that may be covered in short visit. Parents may notice physicians getting impatient due to time constraints and misinterpret it as a dismissive attitude about…

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Livestrong: Do Apps That Pay You to Lose Weight Really Work?

By | In the News

They say there’s no such thing as a free lunch. But what about a healthy lunch you get paid to eat? That’s more or less the premise of weight-loss apps like DietBet and HealthyWage. Users place bets on losing X pounds in Y months, and those who achieve their goal win money or at least, don’t lose money. Can Money Motivate People to Lose Weight? Do the financial incentives these apps offer actually motivate people? Research says yes — as long as you keep using them. An August 2019 study published in JAMA found that Achievement users increased their physical…

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The New York Times: How Anti-Vaccine Sentiment Took Hold in the United States

By | In the News

Faced with risking autism or measles, some parents thought the answer was obvious. Most had never seen measles, mumps or rubella because vaccines had nearly eliminated them. But they believed they knew autism. And most people are notoriously poor at assessing risk, say experts in medical decision-making. Many stumble on omission bias: “We would rather not do something and have something bad happen, than do something and have something bad happen,” explained Alison M. Buttenheim, an associate professor of nursing and health policy at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing. People are flummoxed by numerical risk. “We pay more…

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CNN: Tracking your exercise more effective with competition, study says

By | In the News

“Want to increase your daily steps? Get competitive. A new study followed 602 overweight or obese adults using fitness trackers and found those who entered a competition game to boost their daily steps had the highest increase in physical activity when compared to groups with no, or different, rewards. “We compared whether competition, collaboration or support worked the best. People exposed to competition added 920 steps a day to their activity levels compared to the control group, while the collaboration and support groups only added 600 steps,” said Dr. Mitesh Patel, who directs the Penn Medicine Nudge Unit, the world’s…

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Forbes: Can texting patients who are scheduled for colonoscopy reduce ‘no-shows’?

By | In the News

“Colorectal cancer screening is a vital part of providing care in any medical practice. The American Cancer Society (ACS) recommends that screening for colorectal cancer begin at age 45 in asymptomatic men and women, and every 10 years thereafter. Individuals at higher risk—those with a family history of colorectal cancer or polyps, history of ulcerative colitis or Crohns disease- should undergo screening earlier and more frequently. The May 2018 revision by the ACS—changing screening guidelines to age 45 as opposed to 50 in those at average risk—recommend continuing screening through age 75. They then recommend that those ages 76-85 engage…

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Inverse: Fitness Tracker Study Shows Why Paying People to Exercise Doesn’t Work

By | In the News

“Each day, millions of office workers are paid to sit at their desks all day. Now that we know sedentary life is linked to harmful health consequences, some scientists are coming up with creative incentives to improve people’s health. For instance, What if we actually paid people to be active? It turns out you can pay people to take slightly more steps each day, going by the results of a study published Friday in JAMA Open Network. Overall, people who received a constant payout of $.00020 per step (which works out to 50 cents for every 10,000 steps) walked an…

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