The Washington Post: Why is having too much free time as bad for you as having too little?

By In the News

From The Washington Post: Have you ever had one of those days — that turned into weeks — when you had approximately 645 things to do and not a single minute for leisure time? According to study results published earlier this month in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, an individual’s well-being increases in correlation with their free time — but only to a certain point. While having too little free time isn’t healthy, having too much also diminishes well-being. “What we found is that a moderate amount of free time or discretionary time is kind of the sweet spot that…

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KSL TV: Gephardt: Prices Out The Cost Of Convenience

By In the News

From KSL: Is trading time to save money always the right trade-off? “It’s going to be a person-by-person decision,” said Eric VanEpps, an assistant professor at the University of Utah’s David Eccles School of Business, who teaches behavioral economics. Paying more for convenience to save time is not necessarily a bad thing, he told us. “We shouldn’t treat time as though it doesn’t have any value at all,” VanEpps said. “We should pay attention to the opportunity cost of our time.” Whether we buy pre-sliced veggies to shave time off meal prep, or swing by a coffee shop rather than…

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The New York Times: How to Get Things Done When You Don’t Want to Do Anything

By In the News

From The New York Times: Motivation is the energy that gets us to take action — and I’m not the only one finding it hard to come by. Some of us might have full-on burnout after a year-plus of loss, grief and pandemic challenges. Others could feel more like I do — nothing’s terribly wrong, but we can’t quite find our spark. Whatever situation we’re in, a closer look at motivation might give us more fuel to move forward, both day-to-day and into an uncertain future. People also motivate each other through competition. In a 2016 study, researchers grouped students in an 11-week exercise…

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The Wall Street Journal: How to Motivate Your Teen to Be a Safer Driver

By In the News

From The Wall Street Journal: New research is emerging that shows positive reinforcement works best with drivers, according to a study out of Australia and preliminary findings from University of Pennsylvania researchers, who are still analyzing data collected from more than 2,000 drivers. In their study, one group of drivers received weekly feedback from Progressive Auto Insurance’s Snapshot app on how their hand-held phone use while driving compared with that of others in their age group; another group received up to $50 at the end of a seven-week period if their phone use was among the lowest in their demographic group; and another received…

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COVID-19

Team to Examine Strategies to Increase COVID-19 Testing Rates

By CHIBEblog

A team involving two CHIBE members—CHIBE Associate Director Harsha Thirumurthy, PhD, and Message Effects Lab Director Jessica Fishman, PhD—has been awarded NIH funding to test strategies to increase COVID-19 testing rates. The other team members are Cedric Bien-Gund, MD; and Robert Gross, MD, MSCE, both from the Perelman School of Medicine’s Division of Infectious Diseases. To their knowledge, this group is the first to implement or test whether secondary distribution of COVID-19 self-tests by individuals to others in their social networks can promote SARS-CoV-2 testing. Their recent JAMA Network Open paper found high motivation to distribute COVID-19 self-test kits and to use self-test kits. In addition, this team will…

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