HBR: How Digital Design Drives User Behavior

By | In the News

By Shlomo Benartzi and Saurabh Bhargava: “Decisions of all kinds are increasingly made on screens — and with that shift comes an often-ignored consequence: the design of the digital world can profoundly, and often unnoticeably, influence the quality of our decisions. A review of recent research provides clear evidence that many organizations are currently undervaluing the power of digital design and should invest more in behaviorally informed designs to help people make better choices. In many cases, even minor fixes can have a major impact, offering a return on investment that’s several times larger than the conventional use of financial…

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The Ladders: The Ecological Benefit Of Giving Advice

By | In the News

“When a friend or colleague asks you for advice, you might find yourself as anxious about your response as you are humbled by the gesture. It is no surprise then, that when the recipient appears to respond positively to your words of wisdom you’re jolted with a current of self-assurance. As you should be! That colleague or friend deemed you knowledgeable enough to provide material counsel and you were knowledgeable enough to oblige. New research published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences illustrates this effect by using academic outcomes as a model. The paper was co-authored by Wharton post-doc Lauren Eskreis-Winkler, Wharton professors Katherine Milkman…

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WSJ: Want to Reach Your Savings Goal in 2020? Here’s What the Research Says Will Help

By | In the News

From WSJ: Whether it’s retirement or a down payment, New Year’s is one of the best times to make a financial plan, behavioral economists say. Here are some of their tips and strategies. New Year’s is when many people feel motivated to make a savings or financial plan, and research shows that it’s a good time to do so. A recent survey from Fidelity Investments found that 67% of Americans are considering a New Year’s resolution that relates to their finances. More than half of the 3,012 respondents said they want to save more for goals including retirement. But success…

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Freakonomics: How to Save $32 Million in One Hour

By | In the News

From Freakonomics: For nearly a decade, governments have been using behavioral nudges to solve problems — and the strategy is catching on in healthcare, firefighting, and policing. But is that thinking too small? Could nudging be used to fight income inequality and achieve world peace? Recorded live in London, with commentary from Andy Zaltzman (The Bugle). DUBNER: Our next guest is a physician as well as a professor of medicine and health care management at the University of Pennsylvania. He’s also the director of the Penn Medicine Nudge Unit. He’s done many studies and interventions around patient compliance, physician behavior,…

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Manhattan Times: OMG! Too Many Options?

By | In the News, Uncategorized

“Too many options leads to decreased confidence about making a choice, especially when we are feeling unsure about what the future will bring. University of Pennsylvania Professor Katherine Milkman has shown that as uncertainty rises, we are more prone to choose the options that represent what we want for immediate gratification even if we know that another choice would be better for us in the long run. In addition to her own research studies demonstrating this effect, she cites the real world economic crisis of 2008-2009. During this time of dramatic disruptions and increased uncertainty in the lives of many…

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Medscape: California Tightens Scrutiny of Medical Vaccine Exemptions

By | In the News

In a paper in Health Affairs last year, Alison Buttenheim, PhD, MBA, from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing in Philadelphia, and coauthors concluded that California’s mandatory counseling approach worked. Increasing “the opportunity cost of vaccine exemptions” by requiring the signature of a healthcare provider did reduce these opt-outs, they wrote. Buttenheim told Medscape Medical News that clinicians face challenges in working with parents who have concerns about vaccines. This is only one topic that may be covered in short visit. Parents may notice physicians getting impatient due to time constraints and misinterpret it as a dismissive attitude about…

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Outlook India: Life In The Time Of Choices

By | In the News

“Those of us, who are in our 40s and 50s, and even older, will tend to look at ourselves as ‘Satisficers’, i.e. we chose a ‘good’ option, rather than the best one. This was because either there was a lack of choice — the best wasn’t available in India then — or the best was too expensive to afford. The import liberalization of the 1980s, initiated by the late Rajiv Gandhi, changed many of us into ‘Maximizers’, who sought the best option available. This was because suddenly there were wide arrays of choices in the markets. The trend quickened after…

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Livestrong: Do Apps That Pay You to Lose Weight Really Work?

By | In the News

They say there’s no such thing as a free lunch. But what about a healthy lunch you get paid to eat? That’s more or less the premise of weight-loss apps like DietBet and HealthyWage. Users place bets on losing X pounds in Y months, and those who achieve their goal win money or at least, don’t lose money. Can Money Motivate People to Lose Weight? Do the financial incentives these apps offer actually motivate people? Research says yes — as long as you keep using them. An August 2019 study published in JAMA found that Achievement users increased their physical…

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