CHIBE Annual Report cover 2019-2020

Unveiling the CHIBE Annual Report 2019-2020

By | CHIBEblog

The Center for Health Incentives & Behavioral Economics (CHIBE) is pleased to share our 2019-2020 Annual Report. In this report, you’ll find some of our top publications and news articles from the year, information about our COVID-19 research and projects, impact stories, CHIBE signature programs, awards, funding portfolio, partners, and CHIBE leadership, and our external and internal advisory boards. Read CHIBE Director Kevin Volpp’s opening letter below. 2020 will be a year we never forget. In addition to the devastating impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, the United States is also facing a long-overdue reckoning of its current and historical treatment…

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Team Wins 2 Grants from NIA to Look at Tailoring Nudges to Improve Vaccination and Cancer Screening

By | CHIBEblog

A team involving several CHIBE members has won two grants from the National Institute on Aging to study nudges in cancer care and vaccination. Congratulations to the four investigators: Mitesh Patel, MD, MBA, a member of CHIBE’s leadership team and Director of the Penn Medicine Nudge Unit; Amol Navathe, MD, PhD, CHIBE Associate Director and Assistant Professor of Health Policy and Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine; Kristin Linn, PhD, CHIBE-affiliated faculty member and Assistant Professor of Biostatistics at Penn; and Joshua Liao, MD, MSc, Associate Professor of Medicine at University of Washington School of Medicine and an Adjunct Senior Fellow…

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Livemint: The One Thing You Can Control Right Now: Yourself

By | In the News

We feel powerless over so many things in the pandemic. But learning to practice better self-control can help. When we’re under extreme stress, our brain works overtime to regulate our emotions, attention and behavior. “You can think of self-control as bandwidth,” says Angela Duckworth, professor of psychology at the University of Pennsylvania, who studies self-control. “And right now, it’s divided.” One of the reasons it is so hard to choose a future goal over immediate gratification is because it’s hard to relate to our future self, says Dr. Duckworth. She suggests visualizing yourself in the future the way you want to…

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Freakonomics: Are Ambitious People Inherently Selfish?

By | In the News

Featuring Angela Duckworth This podcasts features the following two questions: Question #1: Is it possible to be both self-interested and altruistic at the same time?   Angela talks about her once-ongoing debate with psychologist and Wharton professor Adam Grant. You can learn more about Grant’s perspective on giving in his 2016 TED Talk. Grant was also featured in Freakonomics Radio Ep. 152 “Everybody Gossips (and That’s a Good Thing)” and Ep. 306 “How to Launch a Behavior-Change Revolution.”   Question #2: Why do we habituate to life’s greatest pleasures?   Angela and Stephen discuss Danny Kahneman’s famous study on colonoscopy-related…

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Freakonomics: Why Are Stories Stickier Than Statistics? (NSQ Ep. 10)

By | In the News

  Angela Duckworth mentions the identifiable victim effect — the idea that a single individual’s story (an identifiable victim) is more compelling than a group of people with the same need (a statistical victim). George Loewenstein, Deborah Small and Jeff Strnad all contributed to the 2005 paper that discusses this theory.   Listen to the full podcast episode at Freakonomics.

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