WHYY: How to Make Good Habits Stick

By Uncategorized

From WHYY: Most people have the best of intentions to exercise regularly, eat right, and finish work or that home project on time. But our gym membership or home exercise equipment often sits idle and we enjoy too many donuts, burgers and fries. A new study in the journal Nature, however, offers some hope to getting people motivated. Looking at over 60,000 participants, researchers found that paying people – just pennies — to workout turned out to be a powerful incentive. This hour, we talk with one of the lead authors, University of Pennsylvania Wharton School’s KATY MILKMAN, about the study’s findings and how the lessons…

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TIME: We Only Think We’re Making Our Own Choices. It Matters How Options are Framed.

By In the News

From TIME Magazine. Choice architecture refers to the many aspects of how a choice is posed that can be manipulated, intentionally or inadvertently, to influence the decisions we make. The options may be the same, but the presentation can change your choice. Before you make a decision, someone has molded many of the characteristics of that choice for you, and these design decisions will in some way affect what you choose. Many people, when first introduced to the concept, are uncomfortable with or even afraid of it. They are afraid their choices might be influenced by something outside their control,…

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UChicago News: The science behind forming better habits, with Katy Milkman

By In the News

From UChicago News: Why is it so hard for us to form good habits—and so easy to form bad ones? Most people turn to the self-help section to find answers, but this is really a question for behavior science. Katy Milkman: The lens is really grounded in some of the basic tenants of economic theory, which say people are rational decision makers and can weigh costs and benefits and come up with the right calculus to make their choices. What behavioral science adds to that mix is really a recognition that people sometimes make mistakes and that this can happen…

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The Guardian: Study Links Too Much Free Time to Lower Sense of Wellbeing

By In the News

From The Guardian:  Researchers have found that while levels of subjective wellbeing initially rise as free time increases, the trend does not necessarily hold for very high levels of leisure. “The sweet spot is a moderate amount of free time,” said Dr Marissa Sharif, a co-author of the study from the University of Pennsylvania. “We found that having too much time was associated with lower subjective wellbeing due to a lacking sense of productivity and purpose.” Writing in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Sharif and colleagues reported how they analysed results from two large-scale surveys, involving a combined…

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Knowledge@Wharton: Is Deflection a Good Business Tactic?

By In the News

From Knowledge@Wharton: Politicians are especially deft at deflection, which is the tactic of answering a question with a question that steers the conversation in a different direction. It’s not an easy skill, but former President Donald Trump mastered it, according to Wharton operations, information and decisions professor Maurice Schweitzer. Schweitzer, whose research focuses on negotiation and communication, pointed to Trump’s confrontational style with reporters during press conferences and frequent refusal to give direct answers. “In the 2016 presidential campaign he repeatedly was asked, ‘Are you going to release your taxes?’ And he would reply, ‘What about [Hillary Clinton’s] emails,’” Schweitzer said….

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