CNBC: The $600 Unemployment Boost has Ended. What’s Next?

By | In the News

Findings from paper of Atheendar Venkataramani  With negotiations between Democrats and Republicans at an impasse, millions relying on that aid are in the dark as to what comes next. … The $600 supplement reduced food insecurity by 30% and led to a 42% reduction in eating less due to financial constraints, according to a paper published Thursday by academics at Boston University and the University of Pennsylvania. Read more at CNBC.

Read More

STAT: Lower the Cost of Producing Doctors, Not Just the Price of Going to Medical School

By | In the News

By David Asch et al: Medicine has become a profession accessible mainly to the rich. Just look at the price tag for medical school. In the 1960s, the four years of medical education needed to earn an M.D. in the United States could be had for about $40,000 in today’s dollars. The price is now $300,000, a 750% increase. About 70% of students take out loans to pay for medical school, graduating with an average of $200,000 in debt. One in five graduates who finance their medical education with loans accumulate more than $300,000 of debt. That average debt is increasingly concentrated in…

Read More

MedPage Today: Healthcare Disruptors: Bringing $0 Copays to Self-Insured Plans

By | In the News

Developing an employer-supported insurance plan that’s affordable for both the company and its workers, and that does away with the red tape, surprise bills and other complaints that are now commonplace in U.S. healthcare, may seem like a pipe dream. Enter The Zero Card, a healthcare marketplace and supplemental employee benefit program already in operation that promises a cheaper, streamlined process for employers with self-insured plans for employees. Employers in almost every market “would stand to gain from working with The Zero Card as a complement to their self-insured plans managed by insurance companies,” commented Daniel Polsky, PhD, a health economist…

Read More