torrey shirk

CHIBE Q&A with Torrey Shirk, Senior Research Coordinator

By CHIBEblog

Get to know Torrey Shirk, a senior research coordinator affiliated with the Center for Health Incentives & Behavioral Economics (CHIBE) through our CHIBE Q&A! You recently joined our team as a senior research coordinator working with Dr. Amol Navathe and the Payment Insights Team. What kind of work were you involved in prior to coming here? Prior to joining the Payment Insights Team, I worked as a clinical research project manager for a medical device company focused on orthopedic, mostly spine, implants. In that role, I worked on preparing manuscripts for publication, and I am an author on a few…

Read More

Fierce Healthcare: MedPAC considers one-time funding boosts for Medicare in 2023 due to COVID-19 confusion

By In the News

From Fierce Healthcare: A key Medicare advisory panel is debating one-time funding boosts to providers for 2023 due to questions on how COVID-19 has permanently impacted the healthcare industry. The Medicare Payment Advisory Commission (MedPAC), which gives Congress advice on Medicare payment issues, discussed during its Thursday meeting how the pandemic will affect payment adequacy in 2023. But members of the panel were concerned about what the healthcare industry will look like that far out, especially for providers. MedPAC will look at healthcare use data from 2020 to help determine payment adequacy, but members were skeptical about what they can…

Read More

Bloomberg Businessweek: One Health-Care Company’s Audacious Plan to Lower Costs—and Still Turn a Profit

By In the News

From Bloomberg Businessweek: Oak Street’s [a 9-year-old company seeking to reinvent care for Medicare patients with low incomes and chronic health problems] business model is possible because of the way it gets paid. Doctors and hospitals traditionally have fee-for-service arrangements, where each test, procedure, or hospital trip generates a payment. The most intense specialty care is often the most lucrative. Critics say this system directs too much time and money to expensive, needless services, while other valuable care—such as preventive screening—is neglected. Oak Street and others flip this model through agreements with private plans that receive a monthly per-patient fee…

Read More