New York Times: Why a Hospital Might Shun a Black Patient

By In the News

By Amol S. Navathe and Harald Schmidt for The New York Times Opinion Doctors like to do good. They also like to make money. Technically, the ways in which physicians are paid are “colorblind.” Despite this, they contribute to inequality. It’s time to fix payment models that don’t address Covid-19’s disproportionate impact on racial and ethnic minorities and don’t align with broader efforts to make health care fair. Research shows that doctors are more likely to choose procedures and treatments that are more profitable for them, whether these are better for patients or not. For example, cancer doctors frequently recommend…

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Fierce Healthcare: MedPAC supports changes to the development of MA plan payment benchmarks

By In the News

The Medicare Payment Advisory Commission (MedPAC), which develops recommendations to Congress on Medicare policy, recently discussed the issue of how Medicare Advantage (MA) plans are paid and showed support to bring payments more in line with traditional Medicare fee-for-service. Amol Navathe is also part of the group, which largely favored creating a new payment approach that calculates MA payments based on a blend of local and national spending as opposed to the current methodology, which sets benchmarks on a county-by-county basis. The panel did not decide on how exactly to blend the Medicare benchmarks and has yet to formalize a…

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New York Times: Study Finds Mortality, Utilization Benefits CareMore ESRD Special Needs Plan

By In the News

Amol Navathe, M.D., Ph.D., says you can think about Medicare Advantage plans as a form of accountable care. “Medicare Advantage plans are capitated, meaning get a fixed budget for each Medicare beneficiary who elects to enroll them. They are at risk for both quality and cost outcomes,” explained Navathe, an assistant professor of health policy and medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. “It is version of accountable care, if you will, that is different than the alternative, which is the traditional fee-for-service system, which is great, in some senses. It [traditional fee-for-service Medicare] provides great coverage. Almost every physician and…

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The Atlantic: 5 Ways the Health-Care System Can Stop Amplifying Racism

By In the News

By Risa Lavizzo-Mourey and Ezekiel J. Emanuel for The Atlantic In recent months, the health disparities among Americans are more apparent than ever. But, it is not the coronavirus pandemic that created the disparaties. Rather, the pandemic has exposed the problem even more. Black and Latino patients are two to three times as likely as white patients to be diagnosed with COVID-19, and more than four times as likely to be hospitalized for it. Black patients are more than twice as likely to die from the virus. They also die from it at younger ages. COVID-19 has exacerbated long-standing trends:…

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CHIBE Annual Report cover 2019-2020

Unveiling the CHIBE Annual Report 2019-2020

By CHIBEblog

The Center for Health Incentives & Behavioral Economics (CHIBE) is pleased to share our 2019-2020 Annual Report. In this report, you’ll find some of our top publications and news articles from the year, information about our COVID-19 research and projects, impact stories, CHIBE signature programs, awards, funding portfolio, partners, and CHIBE leadership, and our external and internal advisory boards. Read CHIBE Director Kevin Volpp’s opening letter below. 2020 will be a year we never forget. In addition to the devastating impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, the United States is also facing a long-overdue reckoning of its current and historical treatment…

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Hidden Brain: Slaying The ‘Fee-for-Service Monster’ Of American Healthcare

By In the News

In the United States, healthcare providers are typically paid based on services provided. The more tests a patient undergoes, the bigger the bill. Vivian Lee, a radiologist and healthcare executive, says this fee-for-service business model needs to be reconsidered. “You’re rewarding people doing things to other people. And actually, in many cases, you’re rewarding that regardless of whether it actually improves a person’s health.” In this episode of Hidden Brain, Lee explores how American medicine has become so profit-driven. What are other possible ways to reach best health outcomes at the lowest price? Listen more from Hidden Brain on NPR.org.

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