The Philadelphia Inquirer: Vaccination rates keep rising in some Philly suburbs, as others plateau, facing access and hesitancy challenges

By In the News

Overall, there’s promising news about Pennsylvania’s vaccine efforts, and progress has been swift since the state opened eligibility to everyone 16 and older earlier this month. As of Thursday, more than half of Pennsylvania’s eligible population had gotten at least one shot, according to Inquirer data analysis. That question of access becomes key as demand slows, said Harald Schmidt, a medical ethics and health policy professor at the University of Pennsylvania who has been studying vaccine allocation. While stakeholders statewide are working to methodically reach people who are experiencing homelessness, have a disability, or are homebound, broader issues of access…

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NC Policy Watch: NC is making progress, but vaccinating homebound seniors remains a big challenge

By In the News

It’s become easier and easier for most people to find available COVID-19 vaccine appointments but getting vaccinated poses a particular challenge for homebound seniors. Getting homebound residents vaccinated involves coordination – connecting organizations that know where they are with vaccine providers, said Charlene Wong, chief health policy officer for COVID-19 at the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services. More than 100 vaccine providers are making home visits, Wong said, and people who need them are being identified by area programs on aging, faith groups, and others. Read more at NC Policy Watch.

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Law 360: States Must Factor Race In COVID-19 Vaccine Prioritization

By In the News

Since the early months of the pandemic, health care organizations such as the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, or NASEM, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and the World Health Organization Strategic Advisory Group of Experts, or WHO SAGE, worked to avoid vaccine inequities by studying ways that vaccines could be allocated to prioritize the people who are more likely to be severely affected by COVID-19. Based on Harald Schmidt’s research, the NASEM recommended phases of vaccine prioritization based on age, occupation, and comorbidities and that vaccine access within each phase be “prioritized for geographic areas identified as…

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The Daily Pennsylvanian: Penn researchers find evidence of racial bias in models used to allocate limited resources

By In the News

A study by Penn researchers found evidence of racial bias in models used to allocate limited health care resources during the COVID-19 pandemic. The most common mortality prediction model, however, overestimates mortality among Black patients and underestimates mortality among white patients, putting Black patients behind white patients in the line to receive scarce resources, Penn Leonard Davis Institute of Health reported. The study was conducted by Perelman School of Medicine instructor George Anesi, Perelman School of Medicine second-year fellow Christopher Chesley, Perelman School of Medicine assistant professor Nwamaka Eneanya, Perelman School of Medicine assistant professor Gary Weissman, Perelman School of Medicine assistant professor…

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Raina Merchant

CHIBE Q&A with Raina Merchant, MD, MSHP, FAHA

By CHIBEblog

Raina Merchant, MD, MSHP, FAHA, is Director of the Penn Medicine Center for Digital Health. She is also an Associate Vice President at Penn Medicine and Professor of Emergency Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine. She has secondary appointments in the Department of Internal Medicine, the Department of Anesthesia and Critical Care, Division of Health Policy, and she serves as Co-Director of the Penn National Clinician Scholars Program. Dr. Merchant recently became a CHIBE-affiliated faculty member as well. Read our CHIBE Q&A to learn more about her. What projects are you working on right now? Much…

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Penn Today: An approach to COVID-19 vaccination equity for Black neighborhoods

By In the News

Nationwide, the rollout for the COVID-19 vaccine has been inequitable, with white individuals being vaccinated at higher rates compared to Black individuals. Leaders from Penn Medicine, Mercy Catholic Medical Center, and the community partnered on designing and running a series of community-based clinics that vaccinated almost 3,000 people, 85% of whom were Black. A retrospective of their efforts on the three initial clinics was published in NEJM Catalyst. While the paper describes the efforts in detail, Lee, senior author Eugenia South, an assistant professor of emergency medicine, and other members of the team describe some of the main takeaways for cities, health systems,…

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