Philadelphia Inquirer: More Black patients are participating in clinical trials for cancer treatment at Penn thanks to this effort

By In the News

From The Philadelphia Inquirer:  Health-care professionals have been wrestling with various inequities in their field, with varying results. One success story is a five-year effort by the Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania to enroll more Black patients with cancer in clinical trials. The trials give more Black patients access to the latest cancer treatments — and promise wider benefits, too. In 2014, Black residents comprised 19% of the 12-county area around and including Philadelphia. And 16.5% of cancer patients were Black. Yet at Abramson, only 12.2% of patients in cancer treatment trials were Black. After the five-year…

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American Medical Association: Machine learning 101: Promise, pitfalls and medicine’s future

By In the News

From the American Medical Association: You’ve heard the term “machine learning” as it’s becoming recognized as a valuable tool to help physicians in diagnosing and managing patients, as well as other aspects of medicine. Two experts recently explained the fundamentals of machine learning, what it means in the clinical setting and the possible risks of using the technology during an education session—“Machine Learning: An Introduction and Discussion of Medical Applications”—that took place during the June 2021 AMA Sections Meetings and was hosted by AMA Medical Student Section While machine learning can help medicine in tremendous ways, physicians must also be mindful that bias in…

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Health Day: One Reason COVID Is More Lethal for Black Americans

By In the News

Black COVID-19 patients in the United States are more likely to die than white patients, but there would be 10% fewer deaths among Black patients if they could get the same level of hospital care as white people, according to new research. “Our study reveals that Black patients have worse outcomes largely because they tend to go to worse-performing hospitals,” said study co-author Dr. David Asch. He is executive director of Penn Medicine’s Center for Health Care Innovation. “Because patients tend to go to hospitals near where they live, these new findings tell a story of racial residential segregation and…

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Penn Medicine: Penn’s Abramson Cancer Center Doubles the Percentage of Black Participants in Clinical Trials

By In the News

A five-year community outreach and engagement effort by the Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania (ACC) to increase enrollment of Black patients into cancer clinical trials more than doubled the percentage of participants, improving access and treatment for a group with historically low representation in cancer research. The percentage of patients enrolled into a treatment clinical trial, for example, increased from 12 to 24 percent. A significant increase was also observed in non-therapeutic interventional and non-interventional trials. “We’ve shown here that a multifaceted, community-based engagement initiative works to improve access to cancer clinical trials by Black patients with cancer,” said…

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USA Today: Vaccine equity remains elusive as vaccination rates for people of color still lag

By In the News

Five months into America’s unprecedented vaccination effort, the trend is holding across much of the nation, as white people continue to be vaccinated at faster rates than Black and Hispanic people in most states. Hispanics make up only 12% of COVID-19 vaccinations, but 17% of the U.S. population, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as of Wednesday. Similarly, 8.8% of those who have received at least one dose are Black, but Black people make up more than 12% of the population. “If we mean equity, and if we mean vaccine for all and justice for all, then there’s still…

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