NPR: Study links abortion denial and poverty; Omission bias and vaccines

By In the News

From NPR: Chabeli Carrazana, a reporter for The 19th, talks about a study that found 72% of women who were denied access to abortion ended up living in poverty. And, human beings are not always good at assessing risk and making rational decisions. Professor Gretchen Chapman about omission bias and how we make decisions and weigh risks on NPR’s podcast: Here & Now. Listen to the full podcast in NPR.

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The Guardian: Omicron brings fresh concerns for US mental health after ‘grim two years’

By In the News

From The Guardian: A Gallup poll conducted in November found that, like last year, only 34% of Americans describe their mental health as “excellent”. Those are the lowest levels in two decades. Even though many people in the United States are now vaccinated against the virus and able to engage in something like a pre-pandemic lifestyle, the country’s population continues to suffer from anxiety and depression. And now there are fresh worries about the Omicron variant and the impact it could have on public life this winter. The new variant – which, early reports suggest, could be more contagious than previous…

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Medical Press: College students in declining mental, physical health one year into COVID-19, study shows

By In the News

From The Medical Press  Following research about college students from before COVID-19 with a survey at the pandemic’s Year I mark, an international team of scientists detected no improvement in the students’ mental well-being even after the introduction of vaccines and the easing of social distancing methods, let alone a return to campuses in many instances. In fact, the researchers in spring 2021 found marked declines in both physical and emotional health—students sustained a 35% decline in their number of daily steps and a 36% increase in the number at risk of clinical depression, or roughly half of the total students surveyed. “We…

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The Washington Post: Before the pandemic, we’d dismiss a scratchy throat. Now, the sniffles can derail plans.

By In the News

From The Washington Post: Anxiety and worry about keeping yourself and others safe can be a weighty burden, says Carolyn Cannuscio, a social epidemiologist and director of research at the University of Pennsylvania’s Center for Public Health Initiatives. Many people may be erring on the side of caution because they want to avoid feeling what Cannuscio calls “anticipatory regret,” or the idea that if you were to cause harm to another person (such as infect them with the coronavirus), you would feel terrible. So, she says, the question becomes, “What can I do to diffuse that anticipatory regret? And one…

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The Hill: Amid Challenges to Biden’s vaccine mandate, study shows they work

By In the News

From The Hill: In early November, the Biden administration announced that large companies with 100 or more employees would have until Jan. 4, 2022, to ensure their workers are fully vaccinated against COVID-19 or to require unvaccinated workers to undergo weekly testing. Companies that fail to comply with this ruling may be fined by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). Twenty-four states and several governors have threatened to challenge the ruling in court, and a federal appeals court has temporarily blocked the mandate. Some business owners also have expressed fear that mandating the vaccine could intensify existing staffing shortages. Many politicians have shied away from mandates,…

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The Daily Pennsylvanian: Penn Medicine COVID-19 symptom reporting program saved lives, according to the new study

By In the News

From The Daily Pennsylvanian: A study found that Penn Medicine’s COVID Watch technology saved two lives per week during the pandemic’s early days through an automated health check-in system powered by text message. On Mar. 23, 2020, two weeks after Penn Medicine admitted its first COVID-19 patient, COVID Watch launched, allowing participants to track symptoms from home, Penn Medicine News reported. A team of registered nurses staffed the program and escalated patients with concerning conditions to a designated group of health care providers. As of today, nearly 20,000 individuals have enrolled in the program. In August 2020, Penn Medicine received a $2.5 million grant by the…

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ABC Action News: COVID-19 vaccine incentives offered for children

By In the News

From ABC Action News: Districts are offering incentives like gift cards, tickets to sporting events and amusement parks, and raffle entries for things like scholarships and bigger prizes. Regardless of how convincing children can be, economics professor Iwan Barankay says the evidence is stacking up that these sorts of incentives don’t really improve vaccine rates much. He says it’s more likely schools have COVID-19 money to spend and will argue if it helps even a few, it’s worth it. Barankay believes two other factors will play more of a role in swaying families to vaccinate children. He says the motivation…

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