WHYY: What will the end of the COVID pandemic look like?

By In the News

More than 50% of adults in the United States have received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine. For many, it feels like the light at the end of the tunnel. But after more than a year of physical distancing and lifestyle changes, people want to know when — and how — life will resume post-pandemic. There’s been a lot of discussion about how society will react to the end of the pandemic. Many predict life will reflect the Roaring ’20s, because people are desperate to socialize after a year of physical distancing. Others predict that won’t be so easy because life has been…

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New York Times: What Do Women Want? For Men to Get Covid Vaccines.

By In the News

As the Biden administration seeks to get 80 percent of adult Americans immunized by summer, the continuing reluctance of men to get a shot could impede that goal. Women are getting vaccinated at a far higher rate — about 10 percentage points — than men, even though the male-female divide is roughly even in the nation’s overall population. The trend is worrisome to many, especially as vaccination rates have dipped a bit recently. The gap exists even as Covid-19 deaths worldwide have been about 2.4 times higher for men than among women. And the division elucidates the reality of women’s disproportionate role in caring for others in American…

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Live Mint: A sensory strategy to help us avert a third wave of covid

By In the News

We must convey a realistic sense of pandemic uncertainty for people to adopt appropriate behavior. News about patients flooding hospitals and crematoriums overfilled with the dead have once again raised the danger signals on covid. But the big question is: How long will this heightened level of caution last? To answer that question, we should first understand why our population became so complacent vis-a-vis the pandemic in the few months preceding the second wave’s rise. In a much-cited article ‘Risk As Feelings’ by George Loewenstein, Elke U. Weber and Christopher K. Hsee, published in Psychological Bulletin, the authors remind us that…

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Law 360: States Must Factor Race In COVID-19 Vaccine Prioritization

By In the News

Since the early months of the pandemic, health care organizations such as the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, or NASEM, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and the World Health Organization Strategic Advisory Group of Experts, or WHO SAGE, worked to avoid vaccine inequities by studying ways that vaccines could be allocated to prioritize the people who are more likely to be severely affected by COVID-19. Based on Harald Schmidt’s research, the NASEM recommended phases of vaccine prioritization based on age, occupation, and comorbidities and that vaccine access within each phase be “prioritized for geographic areas identified as…

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Penn Today: An approach to COVID-19 vaccination equity for Black neighborhoods

By In the News

Nationwide, the rollout for the COVID-19 vaccine has been inequitable, with white individuals being vaccinated at higher rates compared to Black individuals. Leaders from Penn Medicine, Mercy Catholic Medical Center, and the community partnered on designing and running a series of community-based clinics that vaccinated almost 3,000 people, 85% of whom were Black. A retrospective of their efforts on the three initial clinics was published in NEJM Catalyst. While the paper describes the efforts in detail, Lee, senior author Eugenia South, an assistant professor of emergency medicine, and other members of the team describe some of the main takeaways for cities, health systems,…

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CHIBE Q&A with Silvia Saccardo on “Lifestyle and Mental Health Disruptions During COVID-19”

By CHIBEblog

Silvia Saccardo, PhD, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Social and Decision Sciences at Carnegie Mellon University and a CHIBE affiliated-faculty member. She recently published a paper on “Lifestyle and mental health disruptions during COVID-19.” (Authors: Osea Giuntella, PhD; Kelly Hyde, MA; Silvia Saccardo, PhD; and Sally Sadoff, PhD, MA.) Read our Q&A with Dr. Saccardo to learn more about this work. Your study revealed major lifestyle and mental health disruptions among University of Pittsburgh students during the COVID-19 pandemic. For example, you found that 61% of the participants were at risk for depression, which was a 90%…

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