Forbes: Perks And Incentives For Covid-19 Vaccination May Backfire

By In the News

As Covid-19 vaccination rates in the US slow down, more state governments and private organizations are offering perks and incentives to induce those who are still hesitant to change their minds. Multiple states including Colorado, Oregon, Ohio, and California, are awarding lottery prizes of $1 million ($1.5 million in California) to a selected few who get vaccinated. Numerous states and private groups are also offering smaller cash prizes (or gift card equivalents) of $50 to $200 to those receiving the vaccine. Some businesses are offering employees cash rewards or time off to get vaccinated. Others are offering customers free beer, free donuts, or free marijuana. Still other…

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ABC11: Will $25 convince you to get a COVID vaccine? New NCDHHS program aims to increase vaccination rate

By In the News

NCDHHS announced a new financial incentive pilot program to try and increase COVID-19 vaccinations. Beginning Wednesday, the state will offer a $25 summer cash card at select vaccine sites in Mecklenburg, Guilford, Rowan and Rockingham counties. “The more quickly we can get as many people vaccinated in North Carolina, the more quickly we’ll be able to bring summer back,” said Dr. Charlene Wong, the NCDHHS Chief Health Policy Officer for COVID-19. Through Sunday, 52.5% of adults in North Carolina are at least partially vaccinated, well below the national rate of 61.5% of adults. This is the first time the state is offering a financial…

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KUNC: Will Paying People To Get Vaccinated Against COVID-19 Work? What You Need To Know About Colorado’s Million Dollar Vaccine Sweepstakes

By In the News

Colorado has launched its own version of the TV show “Who Wants To Be A Millionaire?” and all residents who are vaccinated against COVID-19 are eligible to win. The state announced it will give away $1 million weekly between June 4 and July 7, using federal CARES Act money that would have gone to vaccine advertising. But how well vaccine incentives actually work remains a bit of an open question. “Colorado, every vaccine works incredibly well,” Gov. Jared Polis said during the Tuesday press conference where he announced the sweepstakes. He pointed to the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine’s 95% effectiveness in keeping people from…

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Greater Good Magazine: Five Ways to Respond to People Who Don’t Want the COVID-19 Vaccine

By In the News

People are lining up to be vaccinated against COVID-19—and they’re looking forward to resuming a normal life. However, not everyone is on board with vaccination. It may help to provide information addressing someone’s concerns from an unbiased resource, such as the Centers for Disease Control or the World Health Organization. Though not everyone will be open to that, those who are may appreciate the straightforward information. Alternatively, if you feel your friend or family member trusts you to give them the straight story, you may want to summarize findings rather than provide detailed studies. However, overwhelming them with too much information could backfire. When presented…

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NPR: Children’s Risk Of Serious Illness From COVID-19 Is As Low As It Is For The Flu

By In the News

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention made a strong statement about the effectiveness of vaccines when it decided that fully vaccinated people don’t need to wear masks in most circumstances. But it left some parents concerned about how the change might affect children too young to be vaccinated. For children in particular, the risk of serious consequences from COVID-19 is the same magnitude as the risk they face from the flu, she says. But many parents seem more worried about the new and less familiar disease. That anxiety is heightened by the new guidelines on mask-wearing. But experts urge parents to…

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Knowledge@Wharton: Will COVID-19 Vaccination Incentives Work

By In the News

Iwan Barankay, Wharton management professor of business economics and public policy, has spent years studying what works to encourage patients to take their medications. His latest paper on statin adherence was published earlier this month. Like many previous studies, this one also finds that financial incentives aren’t persuasive for patients who have complicated lives. Low income, inadequate housing, lack of transportation, caregiving to others in the household, and the sheer burden of chronic illness are all factors that can contribute to laxity. Incentives work best when they are designed to help people overcome behavioral problems of inattention or inconsistency — a bribe…

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K@W: Why Incentives Won’t Raise COVID-19 Vaccination Rates

By In the News

Wharton’s Iwan Barankay and Penn Medicine Center for Health Care Innovation’s executive director Dr. David Asch talks with Wharton Business Daily on SiruisXM about why offering incentives won’t increase COVID-19 vaccination rates. In West Virginia, Gov. Jim Justice is offering $100 savings bonds to young people who get the shot. Not to be outdone, Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine is offering fully vaccinated residents a chance at a $1 million lottery and full college scholarships. The gimmicks certainly get attention, but will they work to get more shots in arms? The short answer is no, according to Wharton management professor Iwan Barankay. Dr. David Asch said while…

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NPR: In Kids, The Risk Of COVID-19 And The Flu Are Similar — But The Risk Perception Isn’t

By In the News

The risk of serious COVID-19 illness in children is comparable to their risk from the flu, but many parents seem more concerned about coronavirus. The issue of risk perception has a lot do with it. Gretchen Chapman states, “Preventive measures that reduce a small risk even substantially but not completely can be underweighted because if your risk goes from one in a thousand to one in a million, it doesn’t really seem that much different to the person.” Listen more at NPR.

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