The Hill: Amid Challenges to Biden’s vaccine mandate, study shows they work

By In the News

From The Hill: In early November, the Biden administration announced that large companies with 100 or more employees would have until Jan. 4, 2022, to ensure their workers are fully vaccinated against COVID-19 or to require unvaccinated workers to undergo weekly testing. Companies that fail to comply with this ruling may be fined by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). Twenty-four states and several governors have threatened to challenge the ruling in court, and a federal appeals court has temporarily blocked the mandate. Some business owners also have expressed fear that mandating the vaccine could intensify existing staffing shortages. Many politicians have shied away from mandates,…

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The Daily Pennsylvanian: Penn Medicine COVID-19 symptom reporting program saved lives, according to the new study

By In the News

From The Daily Pennsylvanian: A study found that Penn Medicine’s COVID Watch technology saved two lives per week during the pandemic’s early days through an automated health check-in system powered by text message. On Mar. 23, 2020, two weeks after Penn Medicine admitted its first COVID-19 patient, COVID Watch launched, allowing participants to track symptoms from home, Penn Medicine News reported. A team of registered nurses staffed the program and escalated patients with concerning conditions to a designated group of health care providers. As of today, nearly 20,000 individuals have enrolled in the program. In August 2020, Penn Medicine received a $2.5 million grant by the…

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ABC Action News: COVID-19 vaccine incentives offered for children

By In the News

From ABC Action News: Districts are offering incentives like gift cards, tickets to sporting events and amusement parks, and raffle entries for things like scholarships and bigger prizes. Regardless of how convincing children can be, economics professor Iwan Barankay says the evidence is stacking up that these sorts of incentives don’t really improve vaccine rates much. He says it’s more likely schools have COVID-19 money to spend and will argue if it helps even a few, it’s worth it. Barankay believes two other factors will play more of a role in swaying families to vaccinate children. He says the motivation…

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Mirage News: Automated Texting System Saved Lives Weekly During First COVID Surge

By In the News

From Mirage News: A life was saved twice a week by an automated text messaging system during the fraught early days of the COVID-19 pandemic and, overall, the patients who enrolled in that system were 68 percent less likely to die than those not using it. These insights about Penn Medicine’s COVID Watch – a system designed to monitor COVID-19 outpatients using automated texts and then escalate those with concerning conditions to a small team of health care providers – were published today in the Annals of Internal Medicine. The COVID Watch team plans to see if the approach, which had originally…

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TIME Magazine: Why Schools Are Paying Kids to Get Vaccinated

By In the News

From TIME Magazine: Emily Largent, an assistant professor of medical ethics and health policy at the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine, says “small, guaranteed incentives” tend to work better than big prizes that aren’t guaranteed, like lotteries. She notes that $100 is unlikely to sway someone who is opposed to vaccines, but it could help ease logistical barriers to vaccination, including transportation costs or time off from work. “To the extent that offering that small cash incentive helps overcome those barriers, it can be really helpful for getting people who are open to being vaccinated across the line and removing…

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Yahoo Finance: Why cash incentives and lotteries for COVID-19 vaccinations failed?

By In the News

From Yahoo! Money: When covid-19 vaccines were first rolled out in the US, government officials and corporations spent months using various tactics to convince the hesitant, from paying them to get their shot to giving them free donuts. The number of unvaccinated adults in the US, which stands at around 80.2 million despite wide vaccine availability, was already evidence of the limited success of these kinds of measures. Now research confirms it. A couple of papers published in recent days found that neither cash payments nor lottery tickets moved vaccine-reticent Americans to get the jab. One lesson for policymakers, who spent months trying…

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UNC University Communications: COVID-19 vaccine incentive program pays off

By In the News

From UNC University Communications: The incentive study guaranteed a $25 card to adults who either received their first dose of COVID-19 vaccine or drove someone to providers participating in the pilot program. The program distributed 2,890 cards to vaccine recipients and 1,374 to drivers. The $25 Summer Card program switched to providing $100 cards after this evaluation was conducted, and data on the $100 Summer Card program are not included in the authors’ review. “Providing guaranteed small financial incentives is a promising strategy to increase COVID-19 vaccination uptake,” said Charlene Wong, the chief health policy officer for COVID-19 at the…

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