PBS News Hour: Seriously Ill Children Often Resist Treatment. Can Offering Simple Rewards Change That?

By In the News

Few scenarios are harder to witness than the suffering of a seriously ill child. For kids with life-threatening diseases, survival often requires procedures that are painful and scary. But a Washington nonprofit is encouraging kids to be active in their own care by rewarding them for enduring their treatment. Paul Solman reports on Hope for Henry’s “Super Path to Super Duper Better” program. We all know that money is a motivator, right? This expression is chlorophyll is not the only green catalyst. Money does matter, says David Asch. Read more at PBS. 

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Cision Press Wire: Florida And Blue Carnegie Mellon Partner To Help Members Make Better Health Decisions

By In the News

Florida Blue, the state’s leading health insurer, announced a partnership with Professor George Loewenstein of Carnegie Mellon University to develop consumer behavior analytics and testing strategies to help the company better engage with consumers so they can make more informed decisions that will lead to improved health outcomes. Loewenstein, considered one of the pioneers of behavioral economics, is the Herbert A. Simon University Professor of Economics and Psychology in the Department of Social and Decision Sciences, as well as co-director of the Center for Behavioral Decision Research at CMU. Additionally, he is director of behavioral economics at the Center for…

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Could the U.S. Mail Deliver Better Colon Cancer Screening Rates?

By In the News

“Some people are so reluctant to get screened for colon cancer that you can’t even pay them to do it — or, at least, you’d need to pay them more than $10. That was the conclusion of a new study by University of Pennsylvania researchers. The study, published in the peer-reviewed Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), aimed to find out whether mailing at-home stool tests to patients who had yet to complete recommended colorectal cancer screening, and offering a financial incentive, was an effective strategy for increasing participation rates.” Read more at Philly, Health Day, EurekAlert, Healio, ScienceDaily,…

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UNDARK: On the Spread of Behavior: Five Questions for Damon Centola

By In the News

Suppose you have an idea that you hope will influence a large group of people. It might be something to improve their health or encourage them to vote for a political party. How do you spread that idea widely and quickly? You might think social media would be far more effective than word of mouth. But it’s generally not that straightforward, according to Damon Centola, the author of ‘How Behavior Spreads: The Science of Complex Contagions.’ He argues that so-called strong ties, which tend to be with family members, close friends, and coworkers are generally more powerful in changing behavior…

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CNBC: How To Get Your New Year’s Resolutions Back On Track

By In the News

Whether it was an unexpected expense or an impulse purchase, chances are you’ve slacked off on your resolution to save more and spend less. That’s OK. Most people typically give up on their financial resolutions six weeks into the new year, according to a survey from LearnVest. “The beginning of the week is a great time to start again,” said Wharton professor and behavioral psychologist Katherine Milkman. “The Monday effect is really robust.” So if you’ve fallen off the wagon, “look for another new date that’s meaningful and use that as the jumping off point,” she said. “That motivates us to achieve more.”…

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