Incentive Product Reviews: Are You Positive For Disability?

By In the News

It’s no wonder that the more rewards you get for performing a task, the greater the incentive to do a good job and the better you feel about doing it. But what if the task is to write an objective review of the company or service? Does compensation obscure the line of objectivity? Samuel Curtis of Cornell SC Johnson Graduate School of Management Kaitlin Woolley, an assistant professor of marketing at Johnson Graduate School of Management, wondered the same. Woolley is the lead author of “Incentives Increase the Relative Aggression of Review Content and the Fun of Writing Reviews” published…

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Penn Today: Hepatitis C screening doubles when tests ordered ahead of time

By In the News

Twice as many eligible patients got screened for hepatitis C when it was already ordered for them compared to those who had to request it, according to a new study by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine. Additionally, the patients in the study—whose average age was 63—completed their screenings much more often when they were contacted via mail as opposed to electronic messaging. The study was published in BMJ. “We think that sending the lab order with outreach was so successful because it framed screening as the default,” says the study’s lead author, Shivan Mehta, the associate chief innovation…

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MedPage Today: Getting Competitive Boosted Physical Activity in Diabetes

By In the News

Turning a lifestyle intervention for type 2 diabetes into a game significantly increased participants’ physical activity, especially if an element of competition was introduced, the randomized iDiabetes trial found. In this 1-year trial of an intervention that included a wrist device to track steps and game elements such as points and levels, participants randomized to small teams in which they competed for leaderboard status significantly increased their mean daily step count relative to a control group (606 more steps, 95% CI 201 to 1,011, P=0.003), noted Mitesh Patel, MD, MBA, of the Crescenz Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Philadelphia, and colleagues…

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Cornell Chronicle: Incentivized product reviews: Positive to a fault?

By In the News

It stands to reason that the more one is compensated for performing a task, the greater the incentive to do a good job and the better one feels about doing it. But what if the task is writing an objective review of a company or service? Does the compensation blur the lines of objectivity? Kaitlin Woolley ’12, assistant professor of marketing in the Samuel Curtis Johnson Graduate School of Management, Cornell SC Johnson College of Business, wondered the same thing. Woolley found that offering direct compensation for posting written reviews results in a greater proportion of positive versus negative emotion across…

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CNN: How to build lasting habits for a better life

By In the News

Many of us know the kinds of habits that could make us healthier, more successful and likely happier. Katy Milkman, professor at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Business, has fought through many of these same roadblocks. As co-founder and co-director of Wharton’s Behavior Change for Good Initiative, she now spends her career studying habit development. “We know from lots of research that people are very resistant in general to making a change. We’re comfortable in our ways. Any deviation from what we’re used to doing feels like a loss, and losses tend to loom larger than gains. We…

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McKinsey: Adam Grant on leadership, emotional intelligence, and the value of thinking like a scientist

By In the News

Adam Grant, the organizational psychologist and Wharton professor who has lauded the virtues of procrastination and diagnosed what may be 2021’s dominant emotion (“languishing”), joined our North America Managing Partner Liz Hilton Segel and other McKinsey leaders for a conversation on building resilient teams and thriving in uncertain times. This conversation was part of a new discussion series for McKinsey partners and clients called “Modern Leadership,” which is designed to explore new dimensions of leadership with experts and leading thinkers who can help strengthen, challenge, and stretch our ability to build resilient teams and thrive in uncertain times. Read on for edited…

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Washington Post: These are the text messages that get people to take vaccines

By In the News

By Katy Milkman, Angela Duckworth, and Mitesh Patel At least 160 million Americans have received one or both doses of a coronavirus vaccine, but demand is falling off rapidly. Doses administered peaked at an average of 3.3 million per day in mid-April but are now down to about 2 million per day. The Biden administration has enlisted celebrities and community leaders to promote vaccination and is spending millions of dollars on television ads. Some states, notably West Virginia, Maryland and Ohio, are using cash incentives. Our research demonstrates that a less flashy effort might also have a significant effect in boosting vaccination rates. In a…

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