New York Times: Inflation Anger

By In the News

From The New York Times: Americans are unhappy about the economy. They report less confidence in it than they did at the start of the Covid pandemic, when the unemployment rate was four times as high as it is now. Their feelings toward the economy are almost as low as they were during the depths of the Great Recession in 2008. How is this possible, given that the unemployment rate is low and the economy has rapidly grown over the past two years? The culprit is what Americans describe as one of the most important problems today: high inflation. Inflation stands out from other problems because it…

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Freakonomics: Is Having Children Worth It?

By In the News

From Freakonomics: DUCKWORTH: I’m Angela Duckworth. DUBNER: I’m Stephen Dubner. DUCKWORTH + DUBNER: And you’re listening to No Stupid Questions. Today on the show: How do you decide whether or not to have children? DUBNER: How many kids — one, two, three, 15, 25. How about zero? DUCKWORTH: Stephen, I’m going to read you an email from a listener whose first name is Iain. Are you ready for it? DUBNER: I am. And hello, Iain. DUCKWORTH: Iain writes: “Before we married, my wife and I easily decided we want to have kids — whether by birth or adoption. The much more difficult…

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NPR: Why Are Masks Such A Big Deal For So Many? Psychologists Have Thoughts

By In the News

From NPR: If you’ve been on a flight or taken public transit recently, you might’ve a lot fewer masks. A Florida judge struck down the federal travel mask mandate last Monday, and while companies aren’t being forced to drop their mandates, many have. Meanwhile, the Omicron subvariant BA.2 now accounts for 75 percent of new COVID cases in the U.S. To mask or not to mask continues to be a divisive question. We get into the psychology of why. Dr. Anthony Fauci, Gretchen Chapman, and Steven Taylor join us for the conversation. Listen to the episode at NPR.

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The Hill: Shaken and Stirred: Back to Work in the ‘Snow Globe Economy’

By In the News

From The Hill: Two years into the COVID era, the economic data show us creeping back to something like the before-times. We’re saving less, spending more, and getting back to work. While some Americans remain on the sidelines, the number of U.S. jobs is near its pre-pandemic peak. March was the month many employers finally welcomed (or dragged) many of us back to the office. Back to normal? Hardly. Even if we are taking the same elevator up from the parking garage, we are not the same people walking back to our desks or stepping behind the counter. The lauded “V-shaped recovery” — the fastest rebound from a modern U.S….

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Apply to Penn’s Online Master of Health Care Innovation Program

By CHIBEblog

Apply to the University of Pennsylvania’s online Master of Health Care Innovation (MHCI) degree, the program that forges a diverse network of innovative thinkers and leaders passionate about improving health care. Students in the 20-month program build a foundation of behavioral economics, policy, operations, and innovation. They apply lessons and methods to their workplace and develop innovation and leadership skills to face urgent needs and long-term challenges. LEARN from expert faculty NETWORK with professionals from across health care INNOVATE in your workplace and career The MHCI is based in the Perelman School of Medicine’s Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy….

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Arnold Ventures: What’s Next for Payment Reform

By In the News

From Arnold Ventures: The United States’ health care system is inefficient and often fails to deliver high-quality, patient-centered care. A key driver of this problem is the predominant way we pay providers. The fee-for-service (FFS) payment system reimburses health care providers based on the volume and type of services they perform, rather than on whether they improve care for patients. Alternatives to FFS—so-called “alternative payment models” (APMs)—can help solve this problem by giving providers stronger incentives and greater flexibility to efficiently deliver patient-centered care that improves population health. These models include accountable care organizations (ACOs), which hold providers accountable for…

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ASPPA: How ‘Fresh Start’ Framing Can Boost Retirement Savings

By In the News

From ASPPA: With past behavioral economics research demonstrating that nudges can be a potent tool for increasing savings rates, the results of a recent study suggest that fresh start framing can be an effective nudge. In “Using Fresh Starts to Nudge Increased Retirement Savings,” John Beshears of Harvard University and NBER; Katherine Milkman of the University of Pennsylvania; and Hengchen Dai and Shlomo Benartzi of the UCLA Anderson School of Management conducted a field experiment among more than 6,000 university employees to study the effect of framing future moments in time as new beginnings, or fresh starts. The idea behind…

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