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Choiceology: Not by a Long Shot: With Guests Katia Jordan & Craig Fox

By In the News

From Choiceology: Humans can easily distinguish between a zero-chance event (e.g., the Washington Nationals winning the World Series in 2022) and a sure thing (e.g., the sun coming up tomorrow). But in between those two clear outcomes, it turns out that we’re not great at estimating odds. In this episode of Choiceology with Katy Milkman, a bias that affects the way we predict the likelihood of rare events. Katia Jordan had all the makings of a tennis star: a preternatural talent, an intense drive to succeed, top-tier coaches, and parents who supported her dream completely. She was certain that she would be the…

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heather schofield

Team to Study Income Volatility and Uncertainty on Mental Health and Wellbeing

By CHIBEblog

Could income instability increase the rate of aging and be detrimental to physical and psychological health among the poor? This is a question that a research team led by Assistant Professor of Health Policy Heather Schofield, PhD, will be examining, thanks to an R01 from the National Institute on Aging. The team was awarded $2.5 million for a four-year randomized controlled trial to study the consequences of income volatility and uncertainty on mental health, wellbeing, and biomarkers of stress. One of the difficulties people experiencing poverty have is not just a low income, but how unpredictable and unstable their earnings…

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CNN: You’re Not the Only One Who’s Confused About the Economy. The Experts Are Baffled, Too

By In the News

From CNN: The recovery wasn’t supposed to go like this. Wall Street and Main Street alike are suffering from whiplash when it comes to the current state of the US economy. In their roles as consumers, investors and members of the workforce, ordinary Americans have the sense that the country is at an economic inflection point, but without a clear picture of what happens next, nor how to prepare. Conventional wisdom is that a recession is characterized by two metrics moving in the opposite direction for a sustained period: Economic output falls, and unemployment rises. That’s not what’s happening now — not…

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Penn Medicine News: Both Gun Owners and Non-Gun Owners Trust Kids’ Doctors in Gun Safety Talks

By In the News

From Penn Medicine News: New research shows that both gun-owning and non-gun-owning parents are open to discussions about gun locks and other firearm safety measures, especially when the conversation is with their child’s pediatrician. The study, led by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, shows a possible avenue for reducing the number of firearm injuries and deaths suffered by children in the United States. The study was published in the Journal of Applied Research on Children. “Parents appreciated a collaborative approach to decision-making and the emphasis on child safety,” said the study’s lead author, Katelin Hoskins, PhD,…

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UCONN Today: Demolishing Schools After a Mass Shooting Reflects Our Deep-Rooted Desire for Purification Rituals

By In the News

From UCONN Today: After the recent shooting in Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, which claimed the lives of 19 children and two teachers, some local residents want the school demolished. Texas state Sen. Roland Gutierrez said that President Joe Biden has offered to help the school district secure a federal grant for the building’s demolition. This is not uncommon. In numerous similar cases, buildings were knocked down, abandoned or repurposed in the aftermath of a tragedy. After the Sandy Hook massacre of 2012 in Newtown, Connecticut, that school was destroyed and rebuilt on a different spot on the same property, at a cost of…

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