Philly Voice: Encouraging use of buprenorphine in emergency departments improves opioid use disorder care, study finds

By In the News

From Philly Voice: A program designed by researchers from the University of Pennsylvania to encourage the use of buprenorphine significantly increased its use in emergency departments, a new study finds. Buprenorphine – a drug that can help people overcome opioid addiction – stabilizes withdrawal and reduces cravings. Research has shown that not only does it help people with opioid use disorder stay in treatment, but it also reduces overdose deaths and other associated complications. However, the researchers found that not all doctors authorized to administer the drug did so. Some gave it to 61% of their patients with opioid use disorders, while others…

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The Philadelphia Inquirer: A Penn professor’s heart stopped at restaurant that had no defibrillator. Few are equipped with the lifesaving devices

By In the News

From The Philadelphia Inquirer: Kevin Volpp’s heart stopped beating while he was eating at a Seasons 52 restaurant, yet he survived after a dinner companion performed CPR and an ambulance crew arrived with an automated external defibrillator — an AED. But after he recovered, Volpp was dismayed to learn that the restaurant itself was not equipped with such a device. A Penn Medicine researcher who studies heart disease — the very condition that sent him to the hospital — Volpp came to suspect most other restaurants were without the lifesaving technology. He was right. The Inquirer asked the top 12…

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Penn Today: Improving diversity in cancer clinical trials

By In the News

From Penn Today: Despite making up 13.4% of the U.S. population, only 5% of Black patients with cancer are enrolled in clinical trials. Of 8,700 patients who participated in trials nationwide related to the 28 oncology drugs approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2018 and 2019, only 4% were Black, according to FDA Drug Trial Snapshot reports. Last year, Washington and Carmen Guerra, an internal medicine physician and vice chair of diversity and inclusion for the Department of Medicine, established a program called Flu-FIT, which used local connections and community events to create opportunities for people to get screened for colorectal…

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Medical Press: College students in declining mental, physical health one year into COVID-19, study shows

By In the News

From The Medical Press  Following research about college students from before COVID-19 with a survey at the pandemic’s Year I mark, an international team of scientists detected no improvement in the students’ mental well-being even after the introduction of vaccines and the easing of social distancing methods, let alone a return to campuses in many instances. In fact, the researchers in spring 2021 found marked declines in both physical and emotional health—students sustained a 35% decline in their number of daily steps and a 36% increase in the number at risk of clinical depression, or roughly half of the total students surveyed. “We…

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