CHIBE in the News

Yahoo Finance: Why cash incentives and lotteries for COVID-19 vaccinations failed?

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From Yahoo! Money: When covid-19 vaccines were first rolled out in the US, government officials and corporations spent months using various tactics to convince the hesitant, from paying them to get their shot to giving them free donuts. The number of unvaccinated adults in the US, which stands at around 80.2 million despite wide vaccine availability, was already evidence of the limited success of these kinds of measures. Now research confirms it. A couple of papers published in recent days found that neither cash payments nor lottery tickets moved vaccine-reticent Americans to get the jab. One lesson for policymakers, who spent months trying…

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AAMC: The cost of being unvaccinated is rising — will people be willing to pay the price?

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From AAMC: Despite the quick approval of safe, highly effective COVID-19 vaccines, vaccination rates in the United States have stagnated over the past few months — with just 69% of adults fully vaccinated as of mid-October. Now, a growing number of employers, governments, and private businesses are requiring vaccination as a condition of employment, imposing financial penalties for those who remain unvaccinated, and excluding unvaccinated individuals from being able to go to restaurants, gyms, concerts, and other large gatherings. A very small number of people have resisted vaccine mandates. ESPN reporter Allison Williams recently made headlines for giving up her job because she refused to get vaccinated….

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UNC University Communications: COVID-19 vaccine incentive program pays off

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From UNC University Communications: The incentive study guaranteed a $25 card to adults who either received their first dose of COVID-19 vaccine or drove someone to providers participating in the pilot program. The program distributed 2,890 cards to vaccine recipients and 1,374 to drivers. The $25 Summer Card program switched to providing $100 cards after this evaluation was conducted, and data on the $100 Summer Card program are not included in the authors’ review. “Providing guaranteed small financial incentives is a promising strategy to increase COVID-19 vaccination uptake,” said Charlene Wong, the chief health policy officer for COVID-19 at the…

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WebMD: Cash Incentives May Help Nudge People to Get COVID Vaccines

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From WebMD: Researchers in this study found that the slide was cut in half at sites offering the cash cards when compared with elsewhere in the same counties and the rest of the state. Among a 401 vaccine recipients who were surveyed, 41% reported the cash card was an important reason for vaccination. People with lower income and people at least 50 were more likely to have been brought by a driver who received a cash card. “We know that these one-on-one conversations between people who have remained unvaccinated and those that they trust and know are really important,” Wong says….

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The DePaulia: Fight or Fright: Controlled fear allows students to experience adrenaline rush

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From The DePaulia: Benign masochism is a term first coined by Paul Rozin, a psychology professor at the University of Pennsylvania, to explain humans perceive no real threat during sensations of fear, instead they actually enjoy these negative feelings. When someone “plays” with fear while fully reassured that no harm will come to them, it is easier to identify the ways they may react if a similar situation, with “real” threat, were to occur. DePaul alumnus Jacob Reno said he seeks out scary movies, haunted houses and rollercoasters any time he can. He said he even wants to try skydiving…

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Health Leaders: Yelp Ratings of Healthcare Facilities May Reveal Death Rate Disparities

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From Health Leaders: U.S. counties with healthcare facilities with the greatest share of 1-star Yelp reviews had the highest death rates, and a difference of just one point—roughly one star—between counties’ average scores could indicate a mortality rate that is better or worse by dozens of lives, according to researchers at the Penn Medicine Center for Digital Health. Yelp is a review website that uses a five-star rating system to evaluate businesses, with one start rating the lowest and five stars rating the highest. “Many of the facilities that provide essential care may not otherwise have standardized measures or approaches…

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WITF: Just 1 in 10 Philly cops reported their vaccination status, but city still says no to stricter vaccine mandate

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From the WITF. Philadelphia officials have again declined to impose a stricter vaccine mandate on municipal workers –– even as the city revealed that barely one in 10 police officers and less than a quarter of all firefighters have submitted proof of vaccination. While other large cities, such as Chicago and New York, are toughening enforcement of vaccine mandates for municipal employees –– and dealing with blowback from vaccine-hesitant workers –– officials in Philadelphia doubled down on their current policy of voluntary compliance. “We don’t have that type of vaccine mandate that New York has,” Dr. Cheryl Bettigole, interim head of the…

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The Medical Progress: Study to assess the impact of a multi-component intervention in reducing racial health disparities

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From the Medical Progress: In an unprecedented effort to address the harmful effects of structural racism on health, 60 predominantly Black neighborhoods in Philadelphia will be part of an ambitious study to assess the impact of a multi-component intervention addressing both environmental and economic injustice on health and well-being, led by Penn Medicine researchers Eugenia C. South, MD, MHSP, and Atheendar Venkataramani, MD, PhD. At the community level, the study includes tree planting, vacant lot greening, trash cleanup, and rehabilitation of dilapidated, abandoned houses. For households, the study will help connect participants to local, state, and federal social and economic…

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WFMZ: Researchers from CHOP, Penn receive $5.3 million grant to reduce unnecessary hospital monitoring practices

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From WFMZ: Researchers from Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the University of Pennsylvania have received a $5.3 million grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) to conduct the Eliminating Monitor Overuse (EMO) clinical trial, seeking to discover how best to reduce the overuse of unnecessary monitoring strategies for infants who have a common lung infection called bronchiolitis. The goal is to reduce these commonplace practices that are currently unsupported by evidence, save patients and hospitals from the burden of unnecessary expenses, and focus on more effective methods of monitoring pediatric health. Deimplementation studies seek to reduce practices that are overused by clinicians, especially…

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VAntage Point: VA doctors seek to harness artificial intelligence to target care for sicker Veterans

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From VAntage Point: A few groups of VA researchers are using artificial intelligence (AI) to identify Veterans at high risk of hospitalization or death. That can help ensure these Veterans get the best care possible. One potential approach was described in a recent article in the journal PLOS ONE. The research pinpointed subgroups of high-risk Veterans. The idea was to match patients with the right types of care, explains the study’s lead author, VA cancer physician and investigator Dr. Ravi Parikh. His colleague, lead investigator Dr. Amol Navathe, a VA internal medicine physician and health economist, said, “Not only can this understanding of…

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