CHIBE in the News

Law 360: States Must Factor Race In COVID-19 Vaccine Prioritization

By In the News

Since the early months of the pandemic, health care organizations such as the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, or NASEM, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and the World Health Organization Strategic Advisory Group of Experts, or WHO SAGE, worked to avoid vaccine inequities by studying ways that vaccines could be allocated to prioritize the people who are more likely to be severely affected by COVID-19. Based on Harald Schmidt’s research, the NASEM recommended phases of vaccine prioritization based on age, occupation, and comorbidities and that vaccine access within each phase be “prioritized for geographic areas identified as…

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MSNBC: The importance of keeping an open mind in a changing world

By In the News

If the fight against COVID-19 has taught us anything, it’s that changing minds means saving lives, especially as it relates to the misinformation that has surrounded the pandemic. NBC’s Joshua Johnson discussed this theory with Adam Grant, Professor of Psychology at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School, and author of the book “Think Again: The Power of Knowing What You Don’t Know.” Watch the talk at MSNBC.

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The Daily Pennsylvanian: Penn researchers find evidence of racial bias in models used to allocate limited resources

By In the News

A study by Penn researchers found evidence of racial bias in models used to allocate limited health care resources during the COVID-19 pandemic. The most common mortality prediction model, however, overestimates mortality among Black patients and underestimates mortality among white patients, putting Black patients behind white patients in the line to receive scarce resources, Penn Leonard Davis Institute of Health reported. The study was conducted by Perelman School of Medicine instructor George Anesi, Perelman School of Medicine second-year fellow Christopher Chesley, Perelman School of Medicine assistant professor Nwamaka Eneanya, Perelman School of Medicine assistant professor Gary Weissman, Perelman School of Medicine assistant professor…

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My Fox 8: Health expert weighs in on what is safe, still high-risk after being vaccinated

By In the News

33 percent of adults in North Carolina are already vaccinated against COVID-19; however, state leaders say no one can let their guard down. Natalie Wilson spoke with North Carolina Department of Health and Services Chief Health Policy Officer for COVID-19 Dr. Charlene Wong about what activities are safe and others that are still high-risk even after being fully vaccinated.   Watch the talk at My Fox 8.

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Washington Post: Vaccine etiquette – A guide to politely navigating this new phase of the pandemic

By In the News

For the past year, the coronavirus pandemic has defined our daily life, determining how we learn, work, eat, travel and socialize. But those parameters are changing, as millions of vaccinated Americans mingle with the millions waiting for their turn and the millions who remain reluctant to get the shots. That means the rules of etiquette are changing, as well. If you see something that disturbs you on social media, it could be that someone shared an article without knowing it was misleading, or did not realize their behavior was unsafe. If it is the latter, try to understand their motivations and privately offer some safer…

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Penn Today: An approach to COVID-19 vaccination equity for Black neighborhoods

By In the News

Nationwide, the rollout for the COVID-19 vaccine has been inequitable, with white individuals being vaccinated at higher rates compared to Black individuals. Leaders from Penn Medicine, Mercy Catholic Medical Center, and the community partnered on designing and running a series of community-based clinics that vaccinated almost 3,000 people, 85% of whom were Black. A retrospective of their efforts on the three initial clinics was published in NEJM Catalyst. While the paper describes the efforts in detail, Lee, senior author Eugenia South, an assistant professor of emergency medicine, and other members of the team describe some of the main takeaways for cities, health systems,…

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LAist: Many Firefighters Are Still Declining The Vaccine As A Brutal Fire Season Looms

By In the News

Last fall, L.A. County Fire and the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health surveyed the organization’s 4,900 employees and found that roughly 45% of them didn’t want to get the vaccine. That was similar to nationwide numbers from around that time. L.A. County’s Kazan and his colleagues knew that if they wanted to convince their people to get protected they had to break through the misinformation. If a firefighter wanted to refuse the vaccine, L.A. County Fire made it so they couldn’t just not show up, or casually check off a box online. The firefighters instead would have to leave the bubble of…

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MarketWatch: My cautionary tale — after an $11 mistake on my 2020 tax return my $11,000 refund and stimulus is now in limbo

By In the News

One of the most challenging aspects of the coronavirus pandemic is the waiting game. You think your stimulus check is on the way, but then you realize you filled out a form incorrectly. Or you believe that restaurants will open up again and they do, until they don’t. Behavioral economist George Loewenstein wrote about this phenomenon in an essay for MarketWatch. “One of the things that makes waiting most unpleasant is uncertainty,” he said. “This is even true of good things. Waiting for a date or a vacation or a wedding that one is confident will happen can be mildly pleasurable, but…

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DocWire News: Opioids Go Unused after Orthopedic Procedures, According to Automated Texting Program

By In the News

In a recent study, patients who underwent common orthopedic and urologic procedures used an automated text messaging system to report pain levels and opioid use. It turns out that many patients may have been overprescribed opioids, as they had unused medication after achieving pain management, the researchers discovered. Senior study author M. Kit Delgado, MD, added, “This study has national implications, as it shows that patients only take a fraction of the amounts that we know are prescribed on average across the country. Previously we showed the median amount of opioid pills prescribed to be 40 tablets for knee arthroscopy and 20…

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Greater Good: Why Thinking Like a Scientist Is Good for You

By In the News

In a rapidly changing world, it’s important to be able to adapt and change rather than stubbornly adhering to old ideas and opinions. This was one of the lessons of 2020, a year that forced us to question many of our assumptions about what behaviors are safe, how work and school can be conducted, and how we connect with others. “In a changing world, you have to be willing and able to change your mind. Otherwise, your expertise can fail, your opinions get out of date, and your ideas fall flat,” says organizational psychologist Adam Grant, author of the new book Think…

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