CHIBE in the News

MedPage Today: New Audio-Only Telemedicine Bill; Chronic Illness, Mental Health Fuel Boom

By In the News

A new telemedicine bill introduced in Congress this month would expand Medicare coverage for audio-only telehealth visits, mHealth Intelligence reported. Virtual visits that use telephone only, not video, have been a challenge for clinicians, as telehealth services exploded after the COVID-19 public health emergency. Regarding emerging trends in telemedicine and telehealth, remote monitoring also significantly dropped hospital readmission rates after total hip or knee replacement, a randomized trial in JAMA Network Open found. Text messages included content about hip or knee exercises, physical activity, and medication management. While the surgery team delivered the same instructions, “the text messaging may have provided reinforcement in real-time to…

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Clinical Oncology News: A New Text Message Initiative to Support Colon Ca Patients

By In the News

Brian Dooreck, MD, of Gastrointestinal Diagnostic Centers in Pembroke Pines, Fla., has diagnosed colorectal cancer hundreds of times during his 15 years in practice. Last spring, he realized something important is often left out of conversations with patients: guidance on where patients can find reliable information and moral support. He began formulating a plan to fill this gap. In early September, Dooreck pitched his idea: the Colorectal Cancer Provider Outreach Program, a text message system to connect patients to these organizations and the free services they provide patients. Now, when gastroenterologists diagnose CRC, they can instruct their patient to text…

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PhillyVoice: Fitness Trackers Get Users to Walk an Extra Mile Every Day, Study Shows

By In the News

A recent study discovered that people walk an extra mile every day if they have an activity tracker on their phones or watches. The study compared studies that tracked exercise activity among those with and without fitness tracking apps. Of the 7,454 people in the study, researchers found that people who were keeping track of their steps were more likely to walk 1,850 more steps each day. Authors of the study suggested that doctors prescribe apps or trackers for patients who want to become more fit. Penn doctors recommend people to use smartphones because everyone is so connected to them,…

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Everyday Health: Can Fitness Trackers and Apps Give Your Exercise Routine a Boost?

By In the News

Recent studies have demonstrated that a wearable fitness tracker or smartphone app can motivate you to exercise more and be committed. Healthcare practitioners should trust in recommending fitness trackers and apps to their patients who want to become more physically active. Since applications and trackers provide feedback and accountability, it tends to boost results. “These findings are important and show promise for using these technologies to improve physical activity,” says Mitesh S. Patel, MD, an associate professor of medicine and healthcare management at the Perelman School of Medicine and the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, and director…

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Rural Health Voice: Payment Inequities

By In the News

How does the way hospitals get paid reinforce healthcare disparities?  Dr. Amol Navathe joined RHV to discuss the need for payment reform and how the current system enables problems. He discusses how even the most well-intentioned of our healthcare providers and hospitals are stuck in a conundrum that is a structural problem with the way we pay for care. Listen more at Rural Health Voice.

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Modern Healthcare: Global budgeting brings financial stability, care redesign to hospitals

By In the News

Global budgets face other headwinds. Policymakers often tie global hospital budgets to other healthcare goals, like increasing access to primary care. According to Medicare Payment Advisory Commission member Dr. Amol Navathe, the marriage of global budgets and primary care can create tension between hospitals and other providers, which could help explain why they haven’t led to the cost savings experts predicted. “Hospitals are not usually in the business of primary care,” he said. In addition, hospital executives might be resistant to aggressively cutting costs since it could lower their budgets and reduce their staff over time, which might shrink their…

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HealthDay: 329 Americans Are Injured by Guns Every Day: Study

By In the News

Firearm injury is a major health crisis in the United States and new research sheds more light on how many of those who are injured survive and the circumstances of their shootings. Intent had a dramatic impact on the likelihood of survival, researchers found. The findings were published Dec. 7 in JAMA Internal Medicine. Roughly 9 out of 10 self-harm injuries ended in death — more than 21,100 per year. About 25% of those injured in assaults or in legal intervention, such as police-involved shootings, died. About 1% of those injured in accidents died, the study revealed. Overall, assaults accounted…

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WHYY: Judge’s ruling on Einstein-Jefferson merger hinges on insurers, not patients

By In the News

Earlier this year, Einstein Healthcare Network could be forced to cut services or close locations unless it merged with Thomas Jefferson University. Einstein Medical Center Philadelphia serves many low-income patients and has been unprofitable for years, and thus was at risk. In opposing the merger, the Federal Trade Commission and Pennsylvania’s attorney general argued that a combined Einstein and Jefferson would control too much of the local health care market, leading to more expensive care. The government’s case is harder to make in Philadelphia, which has a lot of hospitals, said Mark Pauly, professor of health care management at the…

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Penn Today: How Health Systems Can Build a Culture of Anti-Racism

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Given recent events, health systems spoke out against racism and released unprecedented statements of solidary with the African-American community. “Statements are great but if they’re not backed up with actual action, then they’re meaningless,” says Eugenia C. South, an assistant professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine and faculty director of the Penn Urban Health Lab. South says there is a “segregated way of providing care, across all health systems,” borne from the insurance-driven nature of the health care industry. In primary care, resident clinics often serve people with Medicaid or those who are uninsured or under-insured, while faculty clinics…

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KSTP: Local students help launch pilot program to keep seniors safe during flu season

By In the News

More secure and viable health care is presently accessible from your home thanks to the work of a group of high school students. UnitedHealth Group joined forces with four Breck School robotic team individuals to assist in developing the Well At Home kit. Offered to UnitedHealth Group’s most vulnerable clients, this pilot program helps them stay as healthy or get better from an illness without leaving their home — especially important right now during flu season in the midst of a pandemic. So far 883 kits have been sent in Minnesota, and most of those involved are older than 65 — that demographic is at a much high-risk because of the…

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