CHIBE in the News

Incentives Can Help Teens Lose Weight

By In the News

Source: Philadelphia Inquirer, December 20, 2010 Work by LDI CHI researchers Kevin Volpp and others was cited in a news article regarding a study led by a group of researchers at Temple University that found that among teens enrolled in a weight-loss program administered by medical students, 52.6 percent who received financial incentives were able to meet a 16-pound weight loss goal while only 10.5 percent of teens in the group that did not receive incentives were able to lose the 16 pounds

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Imagined Eating Reduces Actual Food Consumption

By In the News

Source: Wall Street Journal Health Blog, December 9, 2010, NPR Radio Interview, December 10, 2010, New York Times, December 13, 2010 Carey Morewedge, Co-investigator at the Penn-CMU Roybal Center on Behavioral Economics at CHIBE, recently published an article in Science demonstrating that research participants who imagined eating large quantities of particular foods (cheese and M&Ms) ate less of the food than other research participants who did not engage in the imaginary consumption exercise. Morewedge attributes the effect to habituation — the human capacity to adjust to particular stimuli, be it bright lights, smells or the food we are eating — though more research is needed…

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Pay Some Now or Pay More Later

By In the News

Source: Washington Post, November 30, 2010 Invited to comment in a summary article on the use of financial incentives to change health behaviors, Kevin Volpp noted that it is less expensive to pay someone to quit smoking now than to pay for emphysema treatment for a long-term smoker. He also noted that more research is needed to determine the optimal use of financial incentives to change health behaviors.

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High-Deductible Health Plans (HDHPs) Reduce Consumer Health Care Use, but Decisions Based On Cost Alone May Not Be Healthy

By In the News

Source: New York Times, November 22, 2010; National Public Radio, November 23, 2010;Philadelphia Inquirer, November 29, 2010  Jeff Kullgren’s recent article in the Archives of Internal Medicine showed that among HDHP enrollees in New England, lower-income families were more likely than higher-income families to report delaying or forgoing health care, although both groups engaged in the behavior. Based on Kullgren’s findings the New York Times opened a discussion about whether consumers who share medical costs have enough knowledge to make health care decisions, while National Public Radio reported that Kullgren’s work echoed results from an older study showing that HDHPs will have a disproportionate impact on the poor. In…

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Ice Cream Now, Broccoli Later

By In the News

Source: Knowledge@Wharton, October 13, 2010  Katherine Milkman’s research exploring online consumer grocery purchasing habits reveals that generally, the sooner people took delivery of their groceries, the less healthy and more expensive the order and that orders placed for delivery farther in the future contained more healthy items and cost less. “Spending decreases as we order food further in the future, but the more immediate the gratification, the more freely we spend,” says Milkman.

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Behavioral Economics in Action: Physicians Easily Persuaded to Rationalize Industry Gifts

By In the News

Source: MedPage Today, September 14, 2010, Science Daily, September 15, 2010 In research by Sunita Sah and and CHIBE Associate Director George Loewenstein published in the September 15, 2010 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, three groups of medical residents received different online surveys. Among the physicians who were reminded of the sacrifices made in obtaining their medical education, twice as many deemed industry gifts acceptable in comparison to the control group. Among the medical residents who were exposed to a suggested rationalization for accepting industry gifts, the number who perceived gifts to be acceptable rose to 60.3%, despite the majority reporting…

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American College of Physicians (ACP) Issues Guidelines on the Use of Incentives to Promote Healthy Behavior

By In the News

Source: ACP Position Paper, September 2010 ACP’s position paper examines potential ethical pitfalls of, and suggests strategies to ensure fairness in, the application of behavioral economics approaches to improve health. ACP developed the guidelines in anticipation of increased use of incentive programs as a consequence of the passage of the March 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, otherwise known as the health care reform bill.

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Massachusetts Pilot Program to Test Rebates for Buying Fresh Vegetables Among Food Stamp Recipients

By In the News

Source: Boston Globe, August 19, 2010 In a Boston Globe article describing a pilot project designed to test the effectiveness of incentives in boosting fresh fruit and vegetable purchases, CHIBE Director Kevin Volpp commented on the laudable goals of the program. He also noted that the rebate mechanism, which directs funds to the recipients’ cards with no visible evidence of a rebate, may not be tangible enough to influence behavior.

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