CHIBE in the News

Peer Mentoring Particularly Effective in Minority Communities

By In the News

Source: NBC News – The Grio, March 27, 2012 Judith Long comments on her study that showed improved glucose control among African-American males through peer mentoring. She noted that “peer mentoring may be particularly effective in minority communities where there is a history of distrust in the system” and that “compared to whites, African-Americans are more likely to trust information from community contacts then they are from health care providers.”

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Future Outlook of Workplace Wellness Programs

By In the News

Source: Chattanooga Times Free Press, March 25, 2012, The Tennessean, January 12, 2012 In an interview regarding workplace wellness programs, Harald Schmidt offered that in order for a program to be truly effective, it needs to look at several factors including better health, cost savings and participation. He also commented that since programs are becoming more common, we ideally should expect to see health improvement and not just cost savings and improved productivity.  

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Peer Mentoring Improves Glucose Control for African American Veterans

By In the News

Source: Penn Medicine News, March 19, 2012; LDI Health Economist, March 20, 2012; New York Times, March 22, 2012 A study recently published in Annals of Internal Medicine found that peer mentoring improved diabetes control among African American Vets. Judith Long, Principal Investigator of the study, commented in a New York Times article that “peer mentoring is an inexpensive, easy and patient-centered way we doctors can support healthy behaviors outside of our offices.” Kevin Volpp adds that that their study “raises the possibility that a more informal, flexible means of providing one-on-one peer support through peer coaches or mentors could…

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Easier SNAP Payments Increase Fresh Produce Sales at Local Farmers’ Market

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Source: Science in Action, March 16, 2012 A study conducted at Clark Park Farmers’ Market by Alison Buttenheim collected SNAP (Food Stamp) payments through an easy electronic point-of-sale system. This easier method of payment increased fresh produce sales to SNAP recipients by 38 percent during the study; however, farmers’ markets would not be able to break even on sales if they paid the costs associated with this system. Buttenheim hopes this study will “inform policymakers about the specific mechanisms driving SNAP redemptions and about the need for subsidies for wireless POS technology at farmers’ markets.”

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Scarcity of Intensive Care Unit Beds and Patient Outcomes

By In the News

Source:  Reuters, March 15, 2012 Scott Halpern and colleague Jason Wagner commented in the Archives of Internal Medicine on a research study done in Canada that showed no difference in patient mortality rates among patients referred to a medical emergency team at three hospitals when intensive care units (ICUs) were full and had to turn some patients away than when they were not.  Overcrowding of ICUs with patients who do not need critical care is common, and, says Halpern, “it’s much easier to transfer a patient to an intensive care unit whether or not they will benefit from it than…

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Mark Pauly Wins $50,000 Health Services Research Prize

By In the News

Source: Association of University Programs in Health Administration LDI Senior Fellow Mark Pauly has been named the 2012 winner of the William B Graham Prize for Health Services Research. The award program is funded by the Baxter International Foundation and administered by the Association of University Programs in Health Administration (AUPHA). The prize includes $50,000 which will be split between Pauly and an institution of his choice to continue and expand his research. The prize will be awarded at the AUPHA Annual Meeting on May 31st in Minneapolis. Pauly is the Bendheim Professor of Health Care Management at Penn’s Wharton School.

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