CHIBE in the News

The Atlantic: A Very Simple Way to Get America Boosted

By In the News

From The Atlantic: Theoretically, incentives should work. Offering people cash to change health behaviors—whether to quit smoking or keep up with exercise—made a difference in previous studies. Cash might provide a fence-sitter justification to get vaccinated, or it might offer cover for someone whose desire for a vaccine goes against local social norms. And even though the COVID vaccines are free, they come with indirect costs, such as lost wages when taking time off from work to get a shot. But theory is different from practice. “It was completely unprecedented for 24 states, more or less at the same time, to…

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CNBC: Experts seriously doubt whether patent waivers on Covid-19 vaccines will ever come to be

By In the News

From CNBC: It’s been well over a year since a landmark proposal brought the issue of patent waiver for the mRNA Covid vaccine to the spotlight. But many observers don’t see that waiving the intellectual property (IP) rights on Covid vaccines is an effective way to put a stop to the pandemic. Supporters of patent waivers like Harsha Thirumurthy, associate professor of medical ethics and health policy at the University of Pennsylvania, argue the issue lies at the heart of the reason why vaccines are less accessible in lower-income countries. “It limits how much manufacturing there can be of that product or…

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Insider: An ER doc says separate COVID-19 clinics should be set up to allow overstretched ERs to focus only on emergency cases

By In the News

From Insider: An ER doctor has suggested that US healthcare systems need to be smarter with adapting to the Omicron wave of COVID-19 infections, with one solution being to re-direct milder cases of COVID-19 out of the emergency rooms so doctors can focus on those who need urgent care. Mucio Kit Delgado, an ER doctor and assistant professor of emergency medicine at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, posted several ideas on how the country’s stressed healthcare systems can deal with COVID-19. In a Twitter thread posted on January 3, Delgado said that the Omicron variant is “crazy contagious,” observing that health…

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Philly Voice: In a time of uncertainty, a healthy lifestyle is a dependable benefit

By In the News

From The Philly Voice:  When it comes to your health, it’s hard to focus on anything outside of the most dominant health event in our lifetime. COVID-19 is responsible for more than 800,000 deaths, suffering and an enormous disruption to our lives. Even the vaccines have been a trigger for debate. And, with the entry of the omicron variant, it is difficult to know where we’ll be this time next year. With all this uncertainty, what remains constant is the value proposition of a healthy lifestyle. It can go a long way to stemming the impact of COVID-19 and, more generally, the…

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Philly Voice: Encouraging use of buprenorphine in emergency departments improves opioid use disorder care, study finds

By In the News

From Philly Voice: A program designed by researchers from the University of Pennsylvania to encourage the use of buprenorphine significantly increased its use in emergency departments, a new study finds. Buprenorphine – a drug that can help people overcome opioid addiction – stabilizes withdrawal and reduces cravings. Research has shown that not only does it help people with opioid use disorder stay in treatment, but it also reduces overdose deaths and other associated complications. However, the researchers found that not all doctors authorized to administer the drug did so. Some gave it to 61% of their patients with opioid use disorders, while others…

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mmHealth Intelligence: Penn Gets $20M to Study Role of Remote Patient Monitoring for Alzheimer’s

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From mmHealth Intelligence: Researchers from Philadelphia-based University of Pennsylvania have received a grant from the National Institute on Aging (NIA) that will help further their research about the use of remote patient monitoring to improve at-home care for individuals living with Alzheimer’s disease and older adults. “Penn is uniquely poised to serve as a research and innovation accelerator based on our expertise in geriatric medicine, aging, Alzheimer’s disease, and biomedical informatics,” Karlawish stated in the press release. “We aim to advance the development of effective solutions that will be used in the real world and ultimately improve the lives of older adults…

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Penn Today: In Peru and the U.S., considering the factors that drive public health

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From Penn Today: Peru has the highest per capita COVID-19 death rate in the world, twice that of the United States. In the U.S., despite abundant availability of vaccines that could have driven that rate even lower, vaccine hesitancy, fueled in part by misinformation spread on social media, has kept millions from receiving the shots. Rather than learning about these issues at an academic level of remove, the course format put experts and students from each country into conversation. Their on-the-ground experiences lent the course discussions both authority and up-to-the-minute relevance for the students, many of whom are or soon…

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The Seattle Times: About 30% of fully vaccinated Americans have gotten boosted; omicron could speed things up

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From The Seattle Times: In public remarks in recent days, federal and state officials have implored people to get boosted as soon as they can. But public health experts and behavioral scientists say uncertainty about who needs boosters and how they help may explain why uptake isn’t higher. Still, they say booster numbers can rise, especially as messaging strengthens around the those doses amid concern about the omicron variant. “Uncertainty and confusion is always going to translate into lower uptake,” said Alison Buttenheim, a behavioral scientist who studies vaccine acceptance at the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Nursing. “It’s pretty…

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Insider: A reward as tiny as 9¢ could help people return to the gym after missing a session, new study finds

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From Insider: Getting back into the gym after missing one workout may be a crucial part of sticking to a routine — and it could take as little as a nine-cent reward to get you there, according to a massive study published December 8 in Nature. Led by researchers from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, scientists from 15 universities studied 61,293 members of 24 Hour Fitness over a four-week period. Together, the team used an experimental format called a mega study to compare 54 different strategies for getting people to the gym more often. They found it was surprisingly…

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Medical Xpress: How observation units and texting shortened hospital stays during COVID-19

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From Medical Xpress: Amid nationwide concerns about increasing strains on hospital capacity, this was a program designed to streamline care for patients who were sick enough to require hospitalization for COVID-19 but could be safely discharged to recover at home after being initially stabilized at the hospital. The origins of the CACP could be traced to a call leaders had in November 2020, when fall was waning and case counts were waxing. David A. Asch, MD, the executive director of the Center for Health Care Innovation, recalls a discussion of a growing number of patients being admitted and discharged in…

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