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CHIBE in the News

Medical Xpress: Expert Discusses Promising Efforts To Mitigate the Opioid Crisis

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From Medical Xpress: For the last 20 years or so, the U.S. has seen a significant increase in opioid and drug overdoses overall. And while there was a slight leveling before the pandemic, “we’ve seen huge increases since COVID-19,” says Margaret Lowenstein, an LDI senior fellow, addiction medicine physician, and assistant professor of medicine at the Perelman School of Medicine. Overdose deaths topped 100,000 annually, setting painful records. “Much of this is due to the rising prevalence of illicitly manufactured fentanyl, which is potent and deadly,” Lowenstein said. “We’re also seeing more stimulant-related overdoses involving drugs such as methamphetamines and cocaine.”…

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Yahoo News 360: Does the Lottery Do More Harm Than Good?

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From Yahoo News 360: What’s happening A winning Powerball ticket worth a record-setting $2.04 billion was purchased in Altadena, Calif., lottery officials announced last week. The jackpot grew to such a staggering amount — more than $400 million higher than the previous record — over the course of several months after 40 straight drawings were held without a winning ticket. The winner, who has yet to be named, will have the option of choosing to receive the full $2 billion in the form of annuity paid annually over 29 years or as a lump sum valued at just under $1 billion. Either way,…

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Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: Allegheny Health Network Serves Notice to Its Rivals With Coraopolis Athletic, Outpatient Center

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From Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: Highmark Health is opening a 78-acre athletic and outpatient medical center to the public in Coraopolis on Monday, three years after rival UPMC and Robert Morris University opened a similar sports complex 5 miles away. It’s a familiar pattern: In Pittsburgh’s highly competitive health care arena, siting hospitals, labs, doctors’ offices — and now athletic facilities — near competitors has become a way to attract patients in a market where the population has been virtually flat or declining. Health care executives from the two rivals have said torrid competition between Highmark and UPMC holds down prices for consumers,…

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Managed Healthcare Executive: Bundled Payment Program Cost CMS $279 Million: JAMA Study

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From Managed Healthcare Executive: One of CMS’s signature value-based care programs wound up costing rather saving CMS money, according to results of a study published this week in JAMA. Although the results can be interpreted in different ways, the study may put a dent in the reputation of value-based care and its promise as a way to rein in U.S. healthcare spending while also keeping the quality of care high. The study by Sukruth A. Shashikumar of the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and his colleagues showed that Bundled Payments for Care Improvement Advanced (BPCI-A) was associated with a $279 million increase…

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Nieman Lab: What Makes an Election Rumor Go Viral? Look at These 10 Factors

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From Nieman Lab: “Rumors are the oldest form of mass media,” Jean-Noël Kapferer wrote in the 1990 book Rumors: Uses, Interpretations, and Images. Reporters and fact-checkers are familiar with the challenges posed by rumors: They tend to be persistent. They are often entertaining. And they sometimes turn out to be true. Today, information often flies faster than facts can be known, as audiences on social networks share the claims, links, and memes that intrigue or outrage them. This is not limited to political content, of course, but it can be particularly impactful in certain domains — such as elections, where confidence in…

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Northwestern Now: Safe Gun Storage Programs Are Successful — If Implemented

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From Northwestern Now: A secure firearm storage program in which pediatricians engage with parents on the importance of secure storage has been proven to help keep firearms out of the hands of young people. But a new study from scientists at Northwestern Medicine, the University of Pennsylvania, Henry Ford Health and Kaiser Permanente Colorado has found preliminary evidence that this program may not be reaching all parents equitably. In the new study, scientists examined a well-established firearm violence-prevention program offered to parents of children ages 5 to 17 during routine pediatric checkups as a way to universally prevent suicide. They discovered…

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Bloomberg Law: Growth of Private Medicare Plans Clouded by Payment Questions

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From Bloomberg Law: A fast-approaching enrollment tipping point for Medicare managed care plans is increasing the urgency for Congress and the HHS to resolve payment issues that threaten the viability and cost-effectiveness of the popular coverage option. Medicare Advantage plans were paid $350 billion in taxpayer funding in 2021, and now cover nearly 46%, or more than 29.7 million, of Medicare’s 64.6 million beneficiaries. MA plan enrollment is expected to hit 31.8 million next year. In the near future, a majority of Medicare beneficiaries are expected to receive their benefits through MA plans, rather than through traditional fee-for-service Medicare. That coverage milestone…

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Fast Company: If We Want Better Innovations in Health Tech, We Need More Competition

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From Fast Company: Google’s chief health officer Karen DeSalvo has repeatedly called access to accurate information “a determinant of health” as she aims to leverage Google’s reach as a tech platform for the benefit of public health. We have ample evidence to support the idea of information as a health determinant, as the pandemic revealed the dangers of rampant misinformation, and we know basic internet access impacts health outcomes. But to achieve what DeSalvo called “a doctor in your pocket”—meaning convenient access to our electronic health records (EHR), real-time chat, or personalized care plans—incumbents in healthcare technology need to feel a sense of competition-driven fear…

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Market Watch: What Happens if You’re Incapacitated? How To Get Your Advance Directives in Order.

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From Market Watch: There are some thorny tasks that everyone knows they should tackle. Every so often, they think, “I should do this.” Then they don’t. Take advance directives. You’ve surely heard that you should think ahead and consider the type of healthcare and medical treatment you’d want if you become incapacitated. If you don’t make these decisions now—and complete the necessary forms to state your wishes—someone else will make the decisions for you later. You know that, right? For some of us, procrastination isn’t the only barrier to checking this off our to-do list. Confusion plays a role as well….

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NPR: Chess, Fishing, Irish Dancing: Cheating Scandals Reveal Why We Care About Cheating

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From NPR: Cheating allegations have rocked many worlds over the last few weeks. Chess, fishing, poker, and even Irish dancing. These ‘sports’ cheating scandals have attracted a lot of attention lately. The reaction from the public makes it clear that society looks down on cheaters. Maurice Schweitzer is a professor at the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania. He studies emotions, trust and ethical decision making and says that our reaction to cheating might tell us something deeper about human nature and why we care about people cheating to get ahead. Listen to the podcast episode at NPR.

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