CHIBE in the News

Arnold Ventures: What’s Next for Payment Reform

By In the News

From Arnold Ventures: The United States’ health care system is inefficient and often fails to deliver high-quality, patient-centered care. A key driver of this problem is the predominant way we pay providers. The fee-for-service (FFS) payment system reimburses health care providers based on the volume and type of services they perform, rather than on whether they improve care for patients. Alternatives to FFS—so-called “alternative payment models” (APMs)—can help solve this problem by giving providers stronger incentives and greater flexibility to efficiently deliver patient-centered care that improves population health. These models include accountable care organizations (ACOs), which hold providers accountable for…

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The Atlantic: America Created Its Own Booster Problems

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From The Atlantic: When the first shots debuted more than a year ago, the message felt mostly uniform. “Everyone was in agreement: These vaccines are fantastic; everyone who’s eligible should get them,” says Gretchen Chapman, a behavioral scientist at Carnegie Mellon University who studies vaccine uptake. And so hundreds of millions of people did. For boosters, experts presented nothing like that unified front. … The erratic narrative on vaccines writ large also hasn’t done the U.S. booster campaign any favors. When the shots were fresh out of the gate, Americans were set up to believe that they could take an…

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ASPPA: How ‘Fresh Start’ Framing Can Boost Retirement Savings

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From ASPPA: With past behavioral economics research demonstrating that nudges can be a potent tool for increasing savings rates, the results of a recent study suggest that fresh start framing can be an effective nudge. In “Using Fresh Starts to Nudge Increased Retirement Savings,” John Beshears of Harvard University and NBER; Katherine Milkman of the University of Pennsylvania; and Hengchen Dai and Shlomo Benartzi of the UCLA Anderson School of Management conducted a field experiment among more than 6,000 university employees to study the effect of framing future moments in time as new beginnings, or fresh starts. The idea behind…

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STAT: How To Fix the Two-Tier U.S. Health Payment System

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By Amol Navathe, Risa Lavizzo-Mourey and Joshua Liao for STAT How the U.S. pays for health care is neither efficient nor fair. Despite spending an astounding 20% of its economic output on health care, the U.S. ranks poorly among high-income countries in national health system performance. To make matters worse, the payment system for this care has ingrained systematic health inequities for historically marginalized groups like people of color and low-income Americans. Many individuals in these groups and their families are covered by public health insurance programs like Medicaid or the Children’s Health Insurance Program. These often pay doctors and hospitals only a fraction of what private insurers…

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NBC News: How Does Inflation Affect Your Spending Decisions?

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From NBC News: Prices have been rising for months on just about everything. Inflation is at the highest level in decades. And because of the way we’re wired, we may be making things worse. “People tend to have a rational response to gains but an emotional response to loss,” said Michael Finke, a professor of wealth management at The American College of Financial Services, a nonprofit institution in Pennsylvania that trains professionals. That’s because loss is processed in the limbic, or emotional part of the brain, and gains register in the prefrontal cortex, where cognitive behavior is processed, Finke said….

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Philadelphia Magazine: This New Collaboration Aims to Improve Philly’s Health Inequities

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From Philadelphia Magazine: Erica Dixon, director of Accelerate Health Equity and project director at Penn Medicine, says that in the summer of 2020, healthcare systems and health-focused organizations across the region came together in conversations about the COVID-19 pandemic, the murder of George Floyd, the Black Lives Matter demonstrations, and the impact all were having on Philadelphians. “The idea of collaborating, breaking down silos, working together — that was a concurrent evolution between many forces, including 13 Southeastern PA health systems declaring that racism is a public health crisis, plus the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association’s pledge to make meaningful…

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EHR Intelligence: EHR Optimization Doubles HCV Screening, Cuts Clinician Burden

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From EHR Intelligence: An EHR optimization doubled completion rates of hepatitis C virus (HCV) screening while cutting down on clinician burden, according to a study published in JAMA Network Open. HCV attacks the liver and is a leading cause of cirrhosis, cancer, and the need for liver transplants. While national guidelines recommend HCV screening for all adults, screening rates remain low. A University of Pennsylvania research team made HCV screening a default order for patients who met guidelines at two different hospitals. They then compared screening rates to a pre-existing alert system that required doctors to respond to a pop-up to make a…

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Philadelphia Inquirer: Philly Hospitals and Key Insurers Plan Novel Effort With the City To Improve Health Equity

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From the Philadelphia Inquirer: For the first time, the region’s largest health systems and its largest insurer are banding together to improve racial equity in health care in Philadelphia. The collaboration, called Accelerate Health Equity, will use pilot programs to try out different approaches and share what is learned. The project will focus on 16 areas, ranging from substance abuse, maternal and infant mortality, obesity/diabetes, and racism in medical settings to food access, housing and community violence. A steering committee with representatives from the 11 participating organizations is expected to meet every six weeks to coordinate and share lessons learned….

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The Atlantic: America’s Flu-Shot Problem Is Also Its Next COVID-Shot Problem

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The Atlantic: About 18 years ago, while delivering a talk at a CDC conference, Gregory Poland punked 2,000 of his fellow scientists. Ten minutes into his lecture, a member of the audience, under Poland’s instruction, raced up to the podium with a slip of paper. Poland skimmed the note and looked up, stony-faced. “Colleagues, I am unsure of what to say,” he said. “We have just been notified of a virus that’s been detected in the U.S. that will take somewhere between 10,000 and 15,000 lives this year.” The room erupted in a horrified, cinematic gasp. Poland paused, then leaned…

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Freakonomics MD: How to Save a Stranger’s Heart

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From Freakonomics MD: There are a lot of stories about cardiac arrest, and each one can help us learn something. Sometimes because the patient also happens to be a researcher. Dr. Kevin Volpp is a doctor and economist at the University of Pennsylvania. You heard him recently on an episode of Freakonomics, M.D., on whether we can pay people to be healthier. Kevin VOLPP: It happened on July 9th of 2021. I had been training for a half Ironman triathlon with one of my daughters. I was probably in the best shape I’d been in since I was 25 years…

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