CHIBE in the News

The ASCO Post: Socially Distant Drive-by FluFIT Clinics May Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening Rates Among Black Patients During the COVID-19 Pandemic

By In the News

According to results presented by Washington et al at the AACR Virtual Meeting: COVID-19 and Cancer, administering colorectal cancer screening kits through a socially distant drive-by flu vaccination clinic increased access to colorectal cancer screening among Black Americans. “Black Americans are about 40% more likely to die from colorectal cancer,” said study author Carmen Guerra, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. While routine screening for colorectal cancer can improve survival, the COVID-19 pandemic—which has disproportionately impacted Black Americans—has led to a dramatic reduction in colorectal cancer screening due to economic hardships and…

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The Philadelphia Inquirer: Cancer treatment tackles a new frontier: Chemo at home, even on the go

By In the News

Penn’s shift of some chemotherapy treatments to home started on a small scale before the pandemic, but then took off, according to Justin Bekelman, the radiation oncologist who directs the Penn Center for Cancer Care Innovation. Bekelman said that Penn had good reasons to launch the effort. “It’s obviously patient-centric and will enhance patients’ experience of cancer treatment,” he said, “but also our infusion suites were all full up.” Most experts see the move as positive for employers and taxpayers, who pay much of the cost of health care. Insurers pay less for patients who choose an at-home option as…

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Annenberg School for Communication: Damon Centola Publishes New Book on Behavior Change

By In the News

Damon Centola’s newest book, Change: How to Make Big Things Happen, addresses how to create change by drawing on his research rooted in the fields of sociology and communication. Centola’s book argues that lasting change in what we think or the way we live is not transmitted from person to person in the simple way that a virus is. The real story of social change is more complex. When we are exposed to a new idea, our social networks guide our responses in striking and surprising ways. “Behavior change, we now understand, is not like a virus, spreading through casual…

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Knowledge @ Wharton: Why You Shouldn’t Be Afraid to Ask Sensitive Questions

By In the News

New research illustrates people do not mind answering sensitive questions, and asking them doesn’t leave a bad impression. Questions about delicate topics can lead to more meaningful conversations and develop a greater understanding and deeper connection. When we’re making a decision or we’re deciding how to negotiate, we really need information from our counterparts. That information can be incredibly important in guiding what we do and what we say. Eric VanEpps and Maurice Schweitzer looked at how different kinds of questions might elicit more or less accurate information. Rather than using questions to elicit information, asking questions can achieve other…

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Annenberg School for Communication: Why Independent Cultures Think Alike When It Comes to Categories – It’s Not in the Brain Damon Centola

By In the News

When it comes to organizing unfamiliar objects, the dominant hypothesis is that people are born with categories already in their brains. However, a recent study from the Network Dynamics Group at the Annenberg School for Communication discovered otherwise. In the experiment, people were asked to categorize unfamiliar shapes. Individuals and small groups created many different unique categorization systems while large groups created systems that were nearly identical to one another. “If people are all born seeing the world the same way, we would not observe so many differences in how individuals organize things,” says senior author Damon Centola, Professor of…

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Penn Today: How medical schools can transform curriculums to undo racial biases

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According to an analysis led by Penn Medicine researchers, medical school curriculums play a role in perpetuating physician bias. The researchers identified key areas in which curriculum misrepresented race in class discussions, presentations, and assessments. “In medical school, 20 years ago, we often learned that higher rates of hypertension in certain racial and ethnic groups, was due to genetic predisposition, personal behaviors, or unfortunate circumstances. Now we know this is not true. There are no characteristics innate to racial and ethnic groups, biological or otherwise, that adequately explains these differences. They stem, instead, from differential experiences in our society—it’s structural…

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Patient Engagement Hit: Revamping Medical Education to Address Racial Bias, Disparities

By In the News

Medical schools must consider how they should approach race in their curricula. Institutional racism in medical industries is gradually being recognized as a critical influence in health disparities, inequities, and racial bias. In a recently published paper, researchers asserted that previous medical school curricula focused on biological differences between races that led to racial health disparities, which is incongruent with today’s understanding of health disparities. “In medical school, 20 years ago, we often learned that higher rates of hypertension in certain racial and ethnic groups, was due to genetic predisposition, personal behaviors, or unfortunate circumstances,” Jaya Aysola, MD, MPH, study…

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Fairfax County Times: How to Keep Your New Year’s resolution

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What are some ways you can keep your New Year’s resolution? Dr. Katherine Milkman suggests ditching the all-or-nothing mindset. For example, if your New Year’s Resolution is to exercise for an hour every day and you happened to miss a day, it is essential to be flexible with yourself in creating your new routine. It may be easy to give up and not return, but it’s just as easy to do a quick version of your routine or to start fresh the next day. “It’s critical to learn how to have a backup plan rather than just throw your hands…

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Docwire News: Remote Monitoring Significantly Decreases Rehospitalizations in Arthroplasty Patients

By In the News

Remote monitoring in patients who underwent joint arthroplasty led to a fourfold decrease in rehospitalizations, a randomized trial found. According to the researchers, this may have been due to goal setting and connection to the care team. The use of telemedicine surged amid the COVID-19 pandemic. It may seem more difficult to implement in some specialties compared to others, including orthopedics. While orthopedic surgeries have not yet moved to the patient’s home, it appears that postoperative patient monitoring has the potential to go remote. “There are great opportunities for health systems and clinicians to improve the quality and value of care…

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Chicago Booth Review: ‘Mental money laundering’ lifts constraints on Spending Morally Questionable Income

By In the News

Numerous experiments have demonstrated that people are more generous with money they’ve earned unethically. But research by Chicago Booth’s Alex Imas, Carnegie Mellon’s George Loewenstein, and Carey K. Morewedge of Boston University discovers there’s a way to avoid this self-imposed penalty: psychologically “launder” the money by obfuscating its source. Their findings suggest the complicated effects this informal bookkeeping can have, as it can cause people to be generous with dirty money but also to find ways to avoid such generosity. In further experiments, they also find evidence that mental money laundering also applied to situations in which ethically and unethically earned money was…

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