CHIBE in the News

Vox: America is in danger of losing its “measles-free” status

By | In the News

If New York’s outbreak continues into October, the loss of measles elimination status will be a gut punch to public health. Eliminating measles took decades of work to achieve. “It was a confirmation that our system of immunization was working really well,” said Hotez. “The fact that measles is back is a worrying sign there’s a problem nationally in our immunization system, that there’s been a breakdown.” “It’s a line in the sand,” said University of Pennsylvania researcher Alison Buttenheim, “to go back to having regularly circulating measles in the country.” If that happens, we’ll have to start worrying about…

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CNN: Tracking your exercise more effective with competition, study says

By | In the News

“Want to increase your daily steps? Get competitive. A new study followed 602 overweight or obese adults using fitness trackers and found those who entered a competition game to boost their daily steps had the highest increase in physical activity when compared to groups with no, or different, rewards. “We compared whether competition, collaboration or support worked the best. People exposed to competition added 920 steps a day to their activity levels compared to the control group, while the collaboration and support groups only added 600 steps,” said Dr. Mitesh Patel, who directs the Penn Medicine Nudge Unit, the world’s…

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Modern Healthcare: Value-Based Payments Are Coming To Post-Acute Care, Says Medpac

By | In the News

” The commission, which includes industry stakeholders, voiced support for adding function and patient experience measures to further encourage post-acute care providers only to accept patients that are appropriate for their setting. Several commission members expressed hope that the quality measures would cause post-acute providers to specialize in the types of patients they serve. That could improve quality overall if providers develop expertise in caring for patients with specific conditions. But some members raised concerns that the quality measures might create financial incentives to underdeliver on the intensity of care. “I don’t disagree with the intent . . . but…

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Modern Healthcare: Medicare Advantage has little impact on traditional Medicare spending

By | In the News

“The policy implications of so-called “spillover” effects aren’t clear yet because more research is needed. MedPAC’s study concluded that the size of the spillover effects are too small to change its prior conclusion that Advantage plans result in higher Medicare spending in some markets and lower Medicare spending in other markets. “This analysis should not be construed as an indictment of MA plan effects. What it’s really saying is that provider level effects are not driving the spillovers,” said Dr. Amol Navathe, a MedPAC member.” Read more at Modern Healthcare

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EurekAlert: Providing more testing choices does not increase colorectal cancer screening rates

By | In the News, Uncategorized

“Offering patients the choice between home screening or in-office colonoscopy does not increase participation in colorectal cancer screening, according to a new Penn Medicine study. However, the framing of choice did impact patient decision-making, as the proportion of colonoscopies — the gold standard for colorectal cancer screening — fell when the home screening option was presented as an available option. This study was published in JAMA Network Open. “As clinicians, we should think carefully about the choices that we offer to patients: While they’re well-meaning and seemingly more patient-centered, choices may actually be overwhelming and could impede decision-making,” said the study’s…

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The Philadelphia Inquirer: Medicare for All and the silly season for health reform

By | In the News

“Perhaps you caught the recent two-page spread in the New York Times (August 13) in which health policy experts weighed in on what they thought should be part of the Democrats’ Medicare for All. Ignoring the fact that this speculation will only become relevant if the Democrats capture the presidency and a filibuster-proof majority in the Senate, (we can dream, can’t we?), what might you learn from reading this? One thing you will not learn is what it will take for MFA to lower medical spending, which was not discussed at all. The primary driver of lower spending forecasts in…

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Forbes: Can texting patients who are scheduled for colonoscopy reduce ‘no-shows’?

By | In the News

“Colorectal cancer screening is a vital part of providing care in any medical practice. The American Cancer Society (ACS) recommends that screening for colorectal cancer begin at age 45 in asymptomatic men and women, and every 10 years thereafter. Individuals at higher risk—those with a family history of colorectal cancer or polyps, history of ulcerative colitis or Crohns disease- should undergo screening earlier and more frequently. The May 2018 revision by the ACS—changing screening guidelines to age 45 as opposed to 50 in those at average risk—recommend continuing screening through age 75. They then recommend that those ages 76-85 engage…

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Daily Mail: American dentists write a whopping 18 million opioid prescriptions every year

By | In the News

“The 2019 study from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, found that the chances of being prescribed opioids for a minor injury like an ankle sprain – or routine wisdom teeth extraction – varies widely depending on the state in which a person lives. Researchers say that patients seeking medical care were on average three times more likely to be given opioids in ‘high-prescribing states’ like Georgia and Nebraska than in ‘low-prescribing states’ like Michigan. The variation increased to 10 times more likely between Arkansas, where the most amount of patients were given opioids, and North Dakota, where the…

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Inverse: Fitness Tracker Study Shows Why Paying People to Exercise Doesn’t Work

By | In the News

“Each day, millions of office workers are paid to sit at their desks all day. Now that we know sedentary life is linked to harmful health consequences, some scientists are coming up with creative incentives to improve people’s health. For instance, What if we actually paid people to be active? It turns out you can pay people to take slightly more steps each day, going by the results of a study published Friday in JAMA Open Network. Overall, people who received a constant payout of $.00020 per step (which works out to 50 cents for every 10,000 steps) walked an…

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NPR: Fresh Starts, Guilty Pleasures And Other Pro Tips For Sticking To Good Habits

By | In the News

“Katy Milkman played tennis at Princeton, and when she finished college, she went to the gym every day. But when she started grad school, her fitness routine went south. ‘At the end of a long day of classes, I was exhausted,’ Milkman says. ‘Frankly, the last thing I wanted to do was drag myself to the gym. What I really wanted to do was watch TV or read Harry Potter.’ But Milkman, who went on to study human behavior and decision-making, found a way to have her exercise and her Harry Potter, too: She resolved to only indulge her love…

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