CHIBE in the News

Taos News: It’s Not Just You: Picking Health Insurance Is Hard

By | In the News

“George Loewenstein of Carnegie-Mellon University — told [Taos News that] he was personally dreading the process of helping his adult son pick a plan. “I have no confidence that I’m going to make the right decision,” [Loewenstein] said. So, it’s not just you. Most of us, Loewenstein and his colleagues found, have two main problems: We don’t understand all the terms, and we have a hard time doing the math.” Read more on Taos News.

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NPR: Good Medical Care Can Suffer Late In The Day

By | In the News

From NPR It could also be that more medically complex patients tend to schedule appointments in the afternoon, the researchers say. Or maybe doctors and patients both experience “decision fatigue” late in the day, which means it’s hard to make difficult decisions — like one about your health — when you’ve already been overloaded with a day’s worth of questions and problems at work or at home. “They’ve been making decisions the whole day,” says Dr. Mitesh Patel, a physician and health economist at the University of Pennsylvania, and the senior author of the cancer screening study. Patients “might say,…

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LiveMint: The Strategic Use Of Social Ties To Contain The Spread Of a Disease

By | In the News

“Why has HIV spread so rapidly through the world’s population but behaviours that can prevent HIV have not? As the world is in the grip of a potential pandemic, this question raised by Damon Centola in his book How Behavior Spreads: The Science Of Complex Contagions is of great significance. Damon relies on the “strong ties, weak ties” framework developed by Mark Granovetter, an American anthropologist, to explain the spread of information, diseases and behaviours.” Read more at LiveMint

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US News & World Report: Penn Med Finds Patients More Likely To Track Steps with Smartphones than Wearable Devices

By | In the News

“Smartphones appear to be more effective than wearable fitness devices in helping doctors track patients’ physical activity, researchers say.” The study was conducted by Dr. Mitesh Patel, who discovered that the habit of carrying a smartphone makes tracking activity level more effective. His research was published in the JAMA Network Open Journal. Read more on U.S. News and World Report    

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Health Affairs: Chronic Condition Self-Service: An Idea Whose Time Has Come?

By | In the News

Customers are more satisfied when they have a self-service option, and companies that offer these services have seen costs decrease. Could self-service also help us meet our chronic care needs? Self-service care is already taking hold in some health care segments. Hims, a men’s health startup focused on erectile dysfunction (ED), male pattern baldness, and performance anxiety offers some insights.” As described by David Asch in a recent New England Journal of Medicine editorial, Hims removed the “choke point” for these (predominantly young) men—the physician-patient gateway to care. Read more on HealthAffairs

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Penn Today: Patients Stick with Smartphone Activity Trackers Longer than Wearable Devices

By | In the News

“Six months after discharge, smartphone users were 32 percent more likely to continue sending health data to the research team than those using wearables.” “Most people with smartphones take them everywhere they go. Since carrying the phone is already a built-in habit, it makes it much easier to use the device to track activity levels,” says the study’s lead author, Mitesh Patel. Dr. Patel’s study was published in the JAMA Network Open journal. Read more at PennToday

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Scientific American: The Perils Of “Survivorship Bias”

By | In the News

An interview with Katy Milkman: Can you explain what survivorship bias is? Imagine you got a letter in the mail that says, “Hey Katy, I have a new stock-picking trick. And since I know you don’t trust me yet, I want to tell you look at Whatever Incorporated tomorrow, and it’s going to go up.” You say, “Well, I don’t know.” But you look at it, and it went up. But anyone can get lucky. So the next week, you get another letter saying, “Tomorrow, I want you to look at Johnson Incorporated, and it’s going to go down.” Now…

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Mirage News: Patients Stick with Smartphone Activity Trackers Longer Than Wearable Devices

By | In the News

“Doctors who want to track their patients’ physical activity might have more luck doing it with smartphones than wearable fitness devices, according to a new Penn Medicine study. The data showed that patients who used smartphones were 32 percent more likely to send in their daily step counts six months after being discharged from the hospital than those who used a wearable fitness tracker. Since smartphones have become near-ubiquitous, these findings — published in JAMA Network Open — signaled to researchers that it is possible to track physical activity on a wider level, which could improve efforts to remotely monitor…

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The Philadelphia Inquirer: To Increase Disposal Of Leftover Opioids, Give Parents A Bag Of … Coffee Grounds?

By | In the News

“The idea — validated by a University of Michigan study — is that parents will be nudged to trash, rather than stash, leftover opioid pills that could tempt misuse among teens or even tots. All the parents have to do is mix the pills with the coffee grounds, then throw the baggie in the garbage, as public health officials recommend. A third of parents who were given a baggie along with the prescription promptly disposed of leftover pills (and emailed a photo to prove it), compared with 19% of parents who went home without a baggie, the Michigan researchers found….

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