CHIBE in the News

CNN: What Apple Watch Can Teach You About Your Heart

By | In the News

From CNN: Enter the collaboration between Apple Watch and Stanford Medical Center. First announced in November, 2017. Initial results were presented at the American College of Cardiology Scientific Session in New Orleans in March. “This is one of the first large-scale studies to use wearables to screen patients for a serious medical condition,” said Dr. Mitesh Patel, who directs the Penn Medicine Nudge Unit, the world’s first behavioral design team embedded within a health system. “Future studies should test ways to combine these technologies with effective engagement strategies to change patient behavior to treat or reduce their risk from these…

Read More

Freakonomics: How to Save $32 Million in One Hour

By | In the News

From Freakonomics: For nearly a decade, governments have been using behavioral nudges to solve problems — and the strategy is catching on in healthcare, firefighting, and policing. But is that thinking too small? Could nudging be used to fight income inequality and achieve world peace? Recorded live in London, with commentary from Andy Zaltzman (The Bugle). DUBNER: Our next guest is a physician as well as a professor of medicine and health care management at the University of Pennsylvania. He’s also the director of the Penn Medicine Nudge Unit. He’s done many studies and interventions around patient compliance, physician behavior,…

Read More

The Atlantic: What Your Facebook Posts Say About Your Mental Health

By | In the News

Psychologists are discovering just how much information about our inner states can be gleaned from social media. For some people, posting to social media is as automatic as breathing. At lunchtime, you might pop off about the latest salad offering at your local lettucery. Or, late that night, you might tweet, “I can’t sleep, so I think I’m just going to have a glass of wine” without a second thought. Over time, all these Facebook posts, Instagram captions, and tweets have become a treasure trove of human thought and feeling. People might rarely look back on their dashed-off online thoughts,…

Read More

BBC: Constantly late with work? Blame the planning fallacy

By | In the News

” Why are we so bad at sticking to schedules? The explanation can’t just be laziness or procrastination, since in many of these cases the employees were working at full productivity. Instead, psychologists tend to blame a cognitive quirk called the planning fallacy, which leads us to consistently underestimate how long it will take us to complete a project. The result is that our original deadlines are flawed from the get-go. Whether you are managing a complex professional project, or simply trying to renovate your house, an understanding of the planning fallacy will help to ensure that you meet every…

Read More

WBUR: How Elizabeth Warren Plans To Pay For ‘Medicare For All’

By | In the News

“How do you think the math in this health care plan checks out? Mark Pauly: “Any projection by economists is all fuzzy math. As Yogi Berra might have said, ‘Fuzzy math projections are fuzzy math, especially about the future.’ And so is this one. There is a set of assumptions — cleverly — I have to give credit for the team that put together these set of numbers, to make the target hit the bullet, to have no explicit tax on the middle class. They did a wonderful job with a kind of tight squeeze. But, as the saying goes,…

Read More

Idiva: Here’s Why Our Brain Always Tends To Think Of The Negatives

By | In the News

“What is negative bias? The roots of the concept were laid down by psychologists Paul Rozin and Edward Royzman in 2001, but the process has been at play since the time of cavemen. The idea behind it is that there is a greater impact on the brain from negative situations than from positive ones. We are most likely to remember a comment made by a stranger which wasn’t entirely peachy for a longer time than the same stranger giving us a compliment. And it’s not just that–because we are so fixated on the bad news, we might not be able to…

Read More

NPR: Open Enrollment Is Here: 6 Tips For Choosing A Health Insurance Plan

By | In the News

“It’s the season to roll up your sleeves, gather your documents, and pick a health insurance plan for 2020. For those shopping for their own plans, HealthCare.gov and the other state exchanges are open for enrollment as of November 1. Despite the rhetoric about the implosion of the Affordable Care Act, the individual mandate going away, and other attempts to hobble the law, the marketplaces are still alive and well. And many people are eligible for subsidies to bring their costs down.” Read more at NPR

Read More

Becker’s Hospital Review: 8 quotes about hospital innovation at Intermountain, Geisinger, Mayo Clinic & more

By | In the News

“Roy Rosin, chief innovation officer, Penn Medicine (Philadelphia): “My goal as chief innovation officer … is to enable teams to rapidly experiment, testing new approaches quickly at low cost. Changing the way care is delivered remains challenging, but we’ve seen material improvements are well within our grasp. Helping reveal that new models have potential and are worth pursuing — often by enabling early evidence of what that different outcome looks like — means we can translate novel insights into actions, pilots and, ultimately, scaled practices.” Read more at Becker’s Hospital Review

Read More

Manhattan Times: OMG! Too Many Options?

By | In the News, Uncategorized

“Too many options leads to decreased confidence about making a choice, especially when we are feeling unsure about what the future will bring. University of Pennsylvania Professor Katherine Milkman has shown that as uncertainty rises, we are more prone to choose the options that represent what we want for immediate gratification even if we know that another choice would be better for us in the long run. In addition to her own research studies demonstrating this effect, she cites the real world economic crisis of 2008-2009. During this time of dramatic disruptions and increased uncertainty in the lives of many…

Read More

Medscape: California Tightens Scrutiny of Medical Vaccine Exemptions

By | In the News

In a paper in Health Affairs last year, Alison Buttenheim, PhD, MBA, from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing in Philadelphia, and coauthors concluded that California’s mandatory counseling approach worked. Increasing “the opportunity cost of vaccine exemptions” by requiring the signature of a healthcare provider did reduce these opt-outs, they wrote. Buttenheim told Medscape Medical News that clinicians face challenges in working with parents who have concerns about vaccines. This is only one topic that may be covered in short visit. Parents may notice physicians getting impatient due to time constraints and misinterpret it as a dismissive attitude about…

Read More