CHIBE in the News

Insider: An ER doc says separate COVID-19 clinics should be set up to allow overstretched ERs to focus only on emergency cases

By In the News

From Insider: An ER doctor has suggested that US healthcare systems need to be smarter with adapting to the Omicron wave of COVID-19 infections, with one solution being to re-direct milder cases of COVID-19 out of the emergency rooms so doctors can focus on those who need urgent care. Mucio Kit Delgado, an ER doctor and assistant professor of emergency medicine at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, posted several ideas on how the country’s stressed healthcare systems can deal with COVID-19. In a Twitter thread posted on January 3, Delgado said that the Omicron variant is “crazy contagious,” observing that health…

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The Seattle Times: About 30% of fully vaccinated Americans have gotten boosted; omicron could speed things up

By In the News

From The Seattle Times: In public remarks in recent days, federal and state officials have implored people to get boosted as soon as they can. But public health experts and behavioral scientists say uncertainty about who needs boosters and how they help may explain why uptake isn’t higher. Still, they say booster numbers can rise, especially as messaging strengthens around the those doses amid concern about the omicron variant. “Uncertainty and confusion is always going to translate into lower uptake,” said Alison Buttenheim, a behavioral scientist who studies vaccine acceptance at the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Nursing. “It’s pretty…

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Insider: A reward as tiny as 9¢ could help people return to the gym after missing a session, new study finds

By In the News

From Insider: Getting back into the gym after missing one workout may be a crucial part of sticking to a routine — and it could take as little as a nine-cent reward to get you there, according to a massive study published December 8 in Nature. Led by researchers from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, scientists from 15 universities studied 61,293 members of 24 Hour Fitness over a four-week period. Together, the team used an experimental format called a mega study to compare 54 different strategies for getting people to the gym more often. They found it was surprisingly…

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Medical Xpress: How observation units and texting shortened hospital stays during COVID-19

By In the News

From Medical Xpress: Amid nationwide concerns about increasing strains on hospital capacity, this was a program designed to streamline care for patients who were sick enough to require hospitalization for COVID-19 but could be safely discharged to recover at home after being initially stabilized at the hospital. The origins of the CACP could be traced to a call leaders had in November 2020, when fall was waning and case counts were waxing. David A. Asch, MD, the executive director of the Center for Health Care Innovation, recalls a discussion of a growing number of patients being admitted and discharged in…

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Medical Xpress: The Link Between Global Health Policy and Sleep

By In the News

From Medical Xpress: “This all started some years ago when I was working on another research project in Chennai,” said Schofield. “I was walking from my hotel to the research office one morning and I passed this family sleeping on the pavement on the side of a six-lane highway with trucks rumbling by in one direction and cows wandering through in the other. There were honking horns and it was really hot and mosquitoes were everywhere. I wondered, “How can they sleep in this?” That got me thinking about the difference in sleep environments and how that variation might play…

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The Philadelphia Inquirer: A Penn professor’s heart stopped at restaurant that had no defibrillator. Few are equipped with the lifesaving devices

By In the News

From The Philadelphia Inquirer: Kevin Volpp’s heart stopped beating while he was eating at a Seasons 52 restaurant, yet he survived after a dinner companion performed CPR and an ambulance crew arrived with an automated external defibrillator — an AED. But after he recovered, Volpp was dismayed to learn that the restaurant itself was not equipped with such a device. A Penn Medicine researcher who studies heart disease — the very condition that sent him to the hospital — Volpp came to suspect most other restaurants were without the lifesaving technology. He was right. The Inquirer asked the top 12…

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MedPage Today: Psychological Barriers May Lead to COVID Vaccine Refusal

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From MedPage Today: Two years into the COVID-19 pandemic — and 1 year after vaccines first became available — there are still those who are opting out of getting vaccinated. Deep distrust in government and science are among the reasons that some are continuing to hold out on the shots. But experts suggest that there are psychological barriers that may have nothing to do with mistrust. To understand all of the factors at play, we need to first recognize how the mind processes the act of making a decision — whether it is to opt in or out. On this…

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Yahoo News: 24 Hour Fitness and University of Pennsylvania’s Behavior Change for Good Initiative Release Findings in Nature From Major Behavioral Science Study on What Really Motivates People

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From Yahoo! News: The results of a years-long behavioral science study conducted through a partnership between the University of Pennsylvania’s Behavior Change for Good Initiative (BCFG) and well known fitness industry leader 24 Hour Fitness, is presented in the December 8 publication of the scientific journal Nature. Nature article summary here: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-021-04128-4 The StepUp Program launched in April 2018, was designed to explore what really motivates gym-goers with the goal of identifying tools to create lasting life-changing healthy habits. The science-based interactive digital program was developed to encourage more visits to the gym and ultimately, better health and fitness for life. BCFG…

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NPR: Study links abortion denial and poverty; Omission bias and vaccines

By In the News

From NPR: Chabeli Carrazana, a reporter for The 19th, talks about a study that found 72% of women who were denied access to abortion ended up living in poverty. And, human beings are not always good at assessing risk and making rational decisions. Professor Gretchen Chapman about omission bias and how we make decisions and weigh risks on NPR’s podcast: Here & Now. Listen to the full podcast in NPR.

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The Guardian: Omicron brings fresh concerns for US mental health after ‘grim two years’

By In the News

From The Guardian: A Gallup poll conducted in November found that, like last year, only 34% of Americans describe their mental health as “excellent”. Those are the lowest levels in two decades. Even though many people in the United States are now vaccinated against the virus and able to engage in something like a pre-pandemic lifestyle, the country’s population continues to suffer from anxiety and depression. And now there are fresh worries about the Omicron variant and the impact it could have on public life this winter. The new variant – which, early reports suggest, could be more contagious than previous…

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