CHIBE in the News

The Guardian: Facts v feelings: how to stop our emotions misleading us

By | In the News

The pandemic has shown how a lack of solid statistics can be dangerous. But even with the firmest of evidence, we often end up ignoring the facts we don’t like. The recent global pandemic has led politicians to make their most consequential decisions in decades, and fast. Many of those decisions depended on data detective work that epidemiologists, medical statisticians and economists were scrambling to conduct. Read more at the Guardian.

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Livemint: The One Thing You Can Control Right Now: Yourself

By | In the News

We feel powerless over so many things in the pandemic. But learning to practice better self-control can help. When we’re under extreme stress, our brain works overtime to regulate our emotions, attention and behavior. “You can think of self-control as bandwidth,” says Angela Duckworth, professor of psychology at the University of Pennsylvania, who studies self-control. “And right now, it’s divided.” One of the reasons it is so hard to choose a future goal over immediate gratification is because it’s hard to relate to our future self, says Dr. Duckworth. She suggests visualizing yourself in the future the way you want to…

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Philly Voice: Excessive, high-dose opioids commonly prescribed after knee surgery, Penn study finds

By | In the News

Opioids prescribed following outpatient knee surgery are often dispensed at strengths linked to an increased risk of overdose death, according to new research from the University of Pennsylvania. “We found massive levels of variation in the proportion of patients who are prescribed opioids between states, even after adjusting for nuances of the procedure and differences in patient characteristics,” said Dr. M. Kit Delgado, a Penn epidemiologist who served as lead author of the study. “We’ve also seen that the average number of pills prescribed was extremely high for outpatient procedures of this type, particularly for patients who had not been…

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Slate: Mistrust Your Memory

By | In the News

For the next week, Mike passes the mic to a few guest hosts. Today, Annie Duke, former professional poker player, cognitive scientist, and author of Thinking in Bets: Making Smarter Decisions When You Don’t Have All the Facts is in the seat again. On the Gist, remembering information. In the interview, Annie talks to Katherine Milkman, a researcher and professor at the University of Pennsylvania who studies behavior, about how the pandemic has thrown everybody out of their old habits and forced the creation of new ones. They discuss how sticky any of these new habits might be, and that we should be…

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K@W: Too Much of a Good Thing? The Perils of Overconfidence

By | In the News

Confidence is Don Moore’s self-professed “singular obsession.” To be more specific, Moore, a management professor at the Haas School of Business at the University of California, Berkeley, who specializes in the psychology of decision-making, is preoccupied with overconfidence. Why do people sometimes think they’re more talented, smarter or more successful than they actually are? Why do they think they’re better than other people? Why are they so adamantly sure they’re right? Moore explores all of these questions and more in his new book “Perfectly Confident.” Recently, he spoke with Wharton operations, information and decisions professor Katherine Milkman about the important distinction between confidence and overconfidence,…

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CNBC: The $600 Unemployment Boost has Ended. What’s Next?

By | In the News

Findings from paper of Atheendar Venkataramani  With negotiations between Democrats and Republicans at an impasse, millions relying on that aid are in the dark as to what comes next. … The $600 supplement reduced food insecurity by 30% and led to a 42% reduction in eating less due to financial constraints, according to a paper published Thursday by academics at Boston University and the University of Pennsylvania. Read more at CNBC.

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