CHIBE in the News

The Hill: Amid Challenges to Biden’s vaccine mandate, study shows they work

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From The Hill: In early November, the Biden administration announced that large companies with 100 or more employees would have until Jan. 4, 2022, to ensure their workers are fully vaccinated against COVID-19 or to require unvaccinated workers to undergo weekly testing. Companies that fail to comply with this ruling may be fined by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). Twenty-four states and several governors have threatened to challenge the ruling in court, and a federal appeals court has temporarily blocked the mandate. Some business owners also have expressed fear that mandating the vaccine could intensify existing staffing shortages. Many politicians have shied away from mandates,…

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The Philadelphia Inquirer: Rapid CPR saves life of Penn physician who studies heart disease

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From The Philadelphia Inquirer: A day after his heart stopped beating, causing him to black out and fall sideways into the arms of a dinner companion, Kevin Volpp was alive and alert, peppering his doctors with questions. He knew better than most that his odds had been grim. A prominent health-policy researcher at the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine, Volpp had coauthored 150 papers on the very topic that landed him in a Cincinnati hospital bed: heart disease. So when cardiologist David M. Harris told Volpp he must have received prompt, high-quality CPR before being taken to the…

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The Daily Pennsylvanian: Penn Medicine COVID-19 symptom reporting program saved lives, according to the new study

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From The Daily Pennsylvanian: A study found that Penn Medicine’s COVID Watch technology saved two lives per week during the pandemic’s early days through an automated health check-in system powered by text message. On Mar. 23, 2020, two weeks after Penn Medicine admitted its first COVID-19 patient, COVID Watch launched, allowing participants to track symptoms from home, Penn Medicine News reported. A team of registered nurses staffed the program and escalated patients with concerning conditions to a designated group of health care providers. As of today, nearly 20,000 individuals have enrolled in the program. In August 2020, Penn Medicine received a $2.5 million grant by the…

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The Mirage News: Clinician peer networks remove race and gender bias

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From Mirage News: A University of Pennsylvania study published today in Nature Communications offers striking evidence that network science can be used to remove race and gender bias in clinical settings. The study, led by Professor Damon Centola of the Annenberg School for Communication and the School of Engineering and Applied Science, offers an effective new way to ensure safer, more equitable health care for women and minorities through managing clinician peer networks. Using an experimental design, researchers showed that clinicians who initially exhibited significant race and gender bias in their treatment of a clinical case, could be influenced to change their clinical recommendations to exhibit no…

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TIME: We Only Think We’re Making Our Own Choices. It Matters How Options are Framed.

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From TIME Magazine. Choice architecture refers to the many aspects of how a choice is posed that can be manipulated, intentionally or inadvertently, to influence the decisions we make. The options may be the same, but the presentation can change your choice. Before you make a decision, someone has molded many of the characteristics of that choice for you, and these design decisions will in some way affect what you choose. Many people, when first introduced to the concept, are uncomfortable with or even afraid of it. They are afraid their choices might be influenced by something outside their control,…

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ABC Action News: COVID-19 vaccine incentives offered for children

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From ABC Action News: Districts are offering incentives like gift cards, tickets to sporting events and amusement parks, and raffle entries for things like scholarships and bigger prizes. Regardless of how convincing children can be, economics professor Iwan Barankay says the evidence is stacking up that these sorts of incentives don’t really improve vaccine rates much. He says it’s more likely schools have COVID-19 money to spend and will argue if it helps even a few, it’s worth it. Barankay believes two other factors will play more of a role in swaying families to vaccinate children. He says the motivation…

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Mirage News: Automated Texting System Saved Lives Weekly During First COVID Surge

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From Mirage News: A life was saved twice a week by an automated text messaging system during the fraught early days of the COVID-19 pandemic and, overall, the patients who enrolled in that system were 68 percent less likely to die than those not using it. These insights about Penn Medicine’s COVID Watch – a system designed to monitor COVID-19 outpatients using automated texts and then escalate those with concerning conditions to a small team of health care providers – were published today in the Annals of Internal Medicine. The COVID Watch team plans to see if the approach, which had originally…

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WebMD Health News: Leaked Documents Show Facebook Put Profit Before Public Good

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From WebMD Health News: A leaked trove of papers from inside Facebook shows that the social media giant’s internal research uncovered a host of problems on the platform related to public health and other issues, but did virtually nothing about it. The files were leaked by a whistleblower, former Facebook employee Frances Haugen, who shared tens of thousands of documents with the Securities and Exchange Commission, Congress, and a consortium of news organizations. She has since testified before the Senate Commerce Subcommittee on Consumer Protection and European lawmakers. “Large organizations that have influence and access to lots of people need…

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TIME Magazine: Why Schools Are Paying Kids to Get Vaccinated

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From TIME Magazine: Emily Largent, an assistant professor of medical ethics and health policy at the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine, says “small, guaranteed incentives” tend to work better than big prizes that aren’t guaranteed, like lotteries. She notes that $100 is unlikely to sway someone who is opposed to vaccines, but it could help ease logistical barriers to vaccination, including transportation costs or time off from work. “To the extent that offering that small cash incentive helps overcome those barriers, it can be really helpful for getting people who are open to being vaccinated across the line and removing…

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The Daily Pennsylvanian: Penn study finds older adults, loved ones have similar response to Alzheimer’s risk diagnosis

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From The Daily Pennsylvanian: A Penn Medicine study found that both older adults and their loved ones had similar responses to news of the risk of an Alzheimer’s diagnosis. The study, published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society and conducted by researchers from the Penn Memory Center, studied the implications of older adults and their loved ones receiving news of their potential risk of Alzheimer’s disease. The researchers tested cognitively unimpaired adults for the risk of Alzheimer’s disease, and found that many of the patients’ loved ones were negatively impacted when they learned about a loved one’s risk diagnosis, the…

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