CHIBE in the News

Yale Insights: No Matter What We Earn, We Believe Our Richer Neighbors Have More to Give

By In the News

By Gal Zauberman for Yale Insights We have a tendency to believe this moral argument— those who are richer should donate a higher proportion of their income. “Most of us cannot perceive how a person can have so much money without having tremendous abundance,” says Yale SOM professor of marketing Gal Zauberman. “We always think that if we only made a bit more, we’d have so much free money [to give].” We are likely to think higher earners should donate more since they have more money to spare. However, as people get wealthier, they also accumulate greater expenses. Hence, their…

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Harvard Business Review: Digital Health Tools Offer New Opportunities for Personalized Care

By In the News

By X. Shirley Chen and Mitesh S. Patel for Harvard Business Review How can health systems implement digital technology as part of their strategy and approach in creating effective behavior interventions? A look at other industries marks a distinguishable pattern: behavioral phenotypes. Companies such as Google or Amazon track individual attributes such as behavior or preferences in order to customize information and design a better, individualized experience. Mitesh Patel and X. Shirley Chen had members of their group conduct a series of studies to demonstrate how behavioral phenotyping could make digital health solutions more effective. The study utilized latent class…

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STAT News: A nudge helps doctors bring up end-of-life issues with their dying cancer patients

By In the News

By Ravi Parikh and Mitesh Patel for STAT News End-of-life conversations are quite important to have with patients that are at risk but yet bring some key challenges for doctors. Firstly, it is difficult for doctors to accurately estimate how long patients have left to live. Additionally, despite the rise in algorithms that can assist in improving the prediction, it is also hard to motivate clinicians to have these conversations with patients. When end-of-life conversations are held early, they can not only improve patients’ quality of life but also decrease their chances of dying on a ventilator or in an…

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Medscape: ‘Internal Competitiveness’ of Docs Spurs Improvement

By In the News

Documenting the stage in the correct box in the EHR could improve patient care – but oncologists don’t often do it. Could oncologists improve their performance of this sometimes neglected but important task? Researchers devised a study that involved 56 oncologists at MGH. Half of them received up to three emails over 6 months that displayed the individual’s rate of proper documentation of disease stage in comparison with that of the whole group. The other half did not receive these emails. The approach worked: receipt of emails (vs no email ― and thus no peer comparison) was associated with increased…

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Medpage Today: HHS Proposes Review of All Its Existing Regulations

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The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) recently proposed a rule which requires the review of regulations to maintain their relevancy and delivery of promised benefits. Regulations would be reviewed by the department every ten years. However, this regulation could be disruptive to certain parties. For instance, healthcare financing rules that are required to be reviewed could affect the associated finances for particular nursing programs. Gail Wilensky, PhD, senior fellow at Project HOPE, expressed that the idea of reviewing old regulations “is certainly a sensible idea, to see whether or not they remain relevant in their current form.” In…

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Harvard Business Review: How to Brace Yourself for Disappointment

By In the News

How do you prepare yourself for what might be a large, perhaps even life-changing, disappointment? First, ask yourself if worrying really helps. If your anxiety motivates you to take action that can affect the outcome, then it might be useful. Balance any agonizing with some sense of hope, as long as your confidence is under control. You won’t guard yourself against pain by trying to feel it ahead of time. Feeling your misery in advance of the news also isn’t helpful because we aren’t very good at predicting future emotions, as extensive research from Dan Gilbert, Tim Wilson, George Loewenstein, and Daniel…

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Forbes: 10 Behavioral Scientists You Should Know

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This recent Forbes article features ten behavioral scientists, including Katy Milkman and Alison Buttenheim. These behavioral scientists are leading examples of impact in health, their work spanning from experimentation to implementation. From Katy Milkman’s massive tests to increase vaccination rates to Neela Saldanha’s efforts to alleviate global poverty, these leading behavioral scientists are making the change they want to see in the world. Alison Buttenheim combines her interest in behavioral economics with a focus on improving child health on a global level. Dr. Buttenheim is a public health researcher and behavioral epidemiologist with a host of appointments at the University…

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The Daily Pennsylvanian: New initiative from Penn researchers aims to advance anti-racist healthcare models

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Eight Penn healthcare researchers created a new initiative, Bold Solutions: Dismantle Racism. Advance Health., aiming to combat racism within the U.S. health system by providing solutions to racism in healthcare and advance antiracist health care delivery models. Penn’s Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics is funding a program of pilot grants to start Bold Solution’s first research projects. Bold Solutions plans to partner with Black faculty, students, and businesses to investigate issues such as financial health, payment models, and economic opportunity. Bold Solutions researcher and director of the Penn Urban Health Lab, Eugenia South, said that the COVID–19 pandemic is…

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Penn Today: Workplace wellness programs could improve if more personalized

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In a program that used three different types of behavioral nudges, personal and psychological characteristics are strongly tied to people’s progress—or lack thereof. The programs were intended to nudge them toward increased physical activity. “A one-size-fits-all approach to nudging new behaviors within wellness programs can have limited success,” says senior author Mitesh Patel, director of the Penn Medicine Nudge Unit. “We’ve shown that different forms of nudging can be effective, and in this latest study on this program, we’ve now demonstrated that matching nudges to the right behavior profiles can unlock their full potential.” Read more at Penn Today.

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Wired: Your Brain Prefers Happy Endings. That’s Not Always Smart

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In a study published Monday in The Journal of Neuroscience, Vestergaard and coauthor Wolfram Schultz show that participants prefer experiences with happy endings to experiences that became slightly less enjoyable towards the end. Based on fMRI imaging, they were able to suggest some of the mechanical underpinnings of this preference by showing that different parts of the brain preserve and process different pieces of information from the same experience. “The specific idea that we were interested in in this work is the disconnect between what people enjoy and what they want,” says Vestergaard. Although people may enjoy sunny beach vacations, if they don’t…

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