News

Philadelphia Inquirer: How to stop teens from texting while driving? Try money

“How does one get teenage drivers to put down their phones while driving? Try making them an offer they can’t refuse: money. That’s one of the strategies suggested by a new survey of adolescent attitudes about phone use and driving that was conducted by researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. The study results, published online this month in the journal Traffic Injury Prevention, involved about 150 Philadelphia-area high school students ages 16 and 17 who own a smartphone, drive regularly, and admitted to texting while driving. A little more than half of the…

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Devdiscourse: Novice drivers could be pursued with financial incentives to stop texting while driving

“Novice drivers who admit to regularly texting at the wheel could be persuaded with financial incentives to reduce cell phone use in the car. Attractive would be car insurance apps, which monitor the driving behavior and reward a renunciation of the smartphone with discounts. Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania come to this conclusion in collaboration with experts from the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.” Read more here.

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Healthcare IT News: How to put behavioral economics to work for more effective patient engagement

“… In a recent interview with Healthcare IT News, Asch explained the value of behavioral economics. While patients might be irrational in their decision-making processes, they’re ‘irrational in highly predictable ways,’ he said. That means that health systems that focus on patient psychology can more successfully leverage that knowledge to help drive engagement and healthier behaviors. ‘The idea that we should educate people and help them make better decisions has only minimal effectiveness,’ said Asch. Behavioral economics shows that consumers are not always rational, even when equipped useful information and handy health gadgets. ‘Fitbits and pedometers don’t make you walk…

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The Inquirer: Rehab after heart attack: How hospitals can make sure it happens

“… For each patient who underwent treatment for a heart attack or received a stent, the nudge alert was sent automatically via secure text to case managers and a transitions coordinator. The team then identified a rehab facility in the patient’s zip code, faxed a referral to that facility, and informed the patient that a representative would be in touch, said cardiac nurse Elizabeth Jolly, one of the researchers. The hospital also followed up with rehab centers by phone. ‘You’ve got to have some type of standard way to make it happen,’ she said. ‘Patients don’t necessarily do a great job…

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India West: UPenn Study Provides Insight into How Consumers Use Wearable Devices in Relation to Health

“… With the popularity of activity trackers on the rise, researchers, led by Patel, are examining their usage patterns to determine how the devices are being utilized, their target market, and ways to encourage sustained use of the gadgets, it said. The Patel-led study was recently published in the Annals of Internal Medicine and provided insight regarding who is using this type of wearable device, how activity trackers are being employed and the length of time consumers will maintain their usage, according to the release. ‘Many people are excited by the potential of using activity trackers to monitor healthy behaviors, but…

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Penn Current: Taking steps to improve activity-tracking results

“… Patel, who has spearheaded several studies about activity trackers since their advent, partnered with Humana between 2014-15 for the largest study of its kind, totaling approximately 4.5 million people who had access to the HumanaVitality wellness program, which incentivized continued use with financial rewards of as much as 25 cents to 40 cents per day. Remarkably, during the two-year monitoring period, only 1.2 percent of the sample—or, 53,245 people—activated a tracking device. But the study also offers good news about trackers with its insights into the habits of those who did use them, even after six months had passed. Eighty percent…

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Dark Daily: Recent Study Looks at How Consumers Use Wearables That Generate Biometric data and Whether Such Data Might Be Valuable for Physicians and Medical Laboratories

“… With the popularity of activity trackers on the rise, researchers are examining their usage patterns to determine how the devices are being utilized, their target market, and ways to encourage sustained use of the gadgets. A recent article published in Annals of Internal Medicine provided insight regarding who is using this type of wearable device, how activity trackers are being employed, and the length of time consumers will maintain their usage. The research was spearheaded by Mitesh Patel, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine and Health Care Management, Perelman School of Medicine and the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania. He believes this is the largest study of…

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Philadelphia Business Journal: Employee Wellness: Montco company has an app for that

“Dr. David Asch, a professor at the Perelman School of Medicine and Penn’s Wharton School, is a member of Val Health’s scientific advisory board. Asch was involved in a 2016 study led by his colleague, associate professor Mitish Patel that looked at the influence of behavioral economics on wellness programs. They found businesses needed to rethink how they encourage workers to participate in such programs. Typically, Asch said, incentives are crafted to reward, or punish, rational behavior. A company, for example, will award a cash bonus for going to the gym a certain number of days each month or they…

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Healthcare IT News: Digital and Personal Connected Health Conference at HIMSS18: Leveraging tech tools for care coordination

“Adoption and its challenges will be the topic of a morning leadership presentation by Partners VP of Connected Health Joseph Kvedar, MD, and Reena Sangar, head of digital and connected health at Ipsos Healthcare. They will talk about how to implement and enable new technologies like patient-generated health data, artificial intelligence, and virtual reality. The morning keynote speaker, Executive Director of the Penn Medicine Center for Innovation David Asch, MD, will introduce another tool for driving adoption and culture change in healthcare: behavioral economics. He will apply lessons from other industries to predict and guide the future of healthcare.” Read…

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