News

BBC World Service: Health Check – World Immunization Week

“This week is World Immunization Week – designed to concentrate efforts to improve the take-up of vaccinations. Gretchen Chapman who’s Professor of Social and Decision Science at Carnegie Mellon University in the US says that simple things like reminders are the best way to boost the number of vaccinations” Listen here (starting at 17:50).

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Harvard Business Review: The best flu prevention might be behavioral economics

“One of the best examples of a successful nudge was reported last year by University of Pennsylvania researchers who, with a simple tweak in the electronic medical record, increased vaccination rates by almost 40% relative to clinics that did not receive the tech change. The intervention was devastatingly simple: When doctors first logged in to a patient chart, they were prompted to either “accept” or “cancel” an order for the flu shot.” Read more here.

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CU Anschutz Today: Shaping behavior effective in boosting vaccination rates

“… In publishing this study, he writes, the authors ‘are performing a service to society by integrating the disconnected literature on psychological theories and vaccination, which can inform practical interventions to address the challenges of vaccination.’ The first author of the study is Noel Brewer of the Gillings School of Public Health at the University of North Carolina and co-authors include Gretchen Chapman, Rutgers University; Alexander Rothman, University of Minnesota; Julie Leask, University of Sydney.” Read the rest of the article at CU Anschutz Today.

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The Washington Post: People can’t be educated into vaccinations, but behavioral nudges help, study finds

“Vaccines were one of the great inventions of modern history. They helped stop America’s polio epidemic in the 1950s, when it was paralyzing thousands and killing at least 3,000 a year. They have prevented the deaths of millions worldwide from diseases such as diphtheria, smallpox, measles and tetanus. And yet many people are reluctant to get their shots or vaccinate their children. A study published Wednesday concludes that using education campaigns, and simply trying to persuade people to get the shots, is far less effective than using indirect behavioral nudges. The reason most people don’t get vaccinations for themselves or their children, the study found, isn’t because…

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The Need For A New Patient-Centered Decision Tool For Value-Based Treatment Choices In Oncology

Over the past decade, breakthroughs in oncology have improved overall and progression-free survival for cancer patients. The rapid pace of drug development and approval has made available multiple therapeutic options for a wide range of cancers. In some cases, these options differ on attributes other than efficacy, such as route of administration (for example, oral versus infusion) or type of side effects. At the same time, the high costs of these novel anticancer medications have placed considerable financial pressure on both the US health care system and—with the continuing insurance trends toward high deductibles and coinsurance levels—on patients. Recognizing that…

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The Inquirer: Rehab after heart attack: How hospitals can make sure it happens

“… For each patient who underwent treatment for a heart attack or received a stent, the nudge alert was sent automatically via secure text to case managers and a transitions coordinator. The team then identified a rehab facility in the patient’s zip code, faxed a referral to that facility, and informed the patient that a representative would be in touch, said cardiac nurse Elizabeth Jolly, one of the researchers. The hospital also followed up with rehab centers by phone. ‘You’ve got to have some type of standard way to make it happen,’ she said. ‘Patients don’t necessarily do a great job…

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Changing Behaviors to Change Health

Five thousand hours. That’s how long the average person spends each year awake and not in front of a doctor. People tend to think of health care as the time you spend getting checkups or going to a doctor’s office or hospital when you’re sick. The truth is your health is substantially more dependent on the time you’re not around your doctor than when you are. It’s about the choices you make during those 5,000 waking hours.Influencing people’s lifestyles and behavior during those hours is the mission of David Asch, MD, MBA. Asch is the director of Penn’s Center for…

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Philadelphia Business Journal: Employee Wellness: Montco company has an app for that

“Dr. David Asch, a professor at the Perelman School of Medicine and Penn’s Wharton School, is a member of Val Health’s scientific advisory board. Asch was involved in a 2016 study led by his colleague, associate professor Mitish Patel that looked at the influence of behavioral economics on wellness programs. They found businesses needed to rethink how they encourage workers to participate in such programs. Typically, Asch said, incentives are crafted to reward, or punish, rational behavior. A company, for example, will award a cash bonus for going to the gym a certain number of days each month or they…

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