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In the News

Category Archives: In the News

MarketWatch: My cautionary tale — after an $11 mistake on my 2020 tax return my $11,000 refund and stimulus is now in limbo

By In the News

One of the most challenging aspects of the coronavirus pandemic is the waiting game. You think your stimulus check is on the way, but then you realize you filled out a form incorrectly. Or you believe that restaurants will open up again and they do, until they don’t. Behavioral economist George Loewenstein wrote about this phenomenon in an essay for MarketWatch. “One of the things that makes waiting most unpleasant is uncertainty,” he said. “This is even true of good things. Waiting for a date or a vacation or a wedding that one is confident will happen can be mildly pleasurable, but…

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DocWire News: Opioids Go Unused after Orthopedic Procedures, According to Automated Texting Program

By In the News

In a recent study, patients who underwent common orthopedic and urologic procedures used an automated text messaging system to report pain levels and opioid use. It turns out that many patients may have been overprescribed opioids, as they had unused medication after achieving pain management, the researchers discovered. Senior study author M. Kit Delgado, MD, added, “This study has national implications, as it shows that patients only take a fraction of the amounts that we know are prescribed on average across the country. Previously we showed the median amount of opioid pills prescribed to be 40 tablets for knee arthroscopy and 20…

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Greater Good: Why Thinking Like a Scientist Is Good for You

By In the News

In a rapidly changing world, it’s important to be able to adapt and change rather than stubbornly adhering to old ideas and opinions. This was one of the lessons of 2020, a year that forced us to question many of our assumptions about what behaviors are safe, how work and school can be conducted, and how we connect with others. “In a changing world, you have to be willing and able to change your mind. Otherwise, your expertise can fail, your opinions get out of date, and your ideas fall flat,” says organizational psychologist Adam Grant, author of the new book Think…

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Medscape: Community Oncologists Balk at Home Chemo’s Financial Effects

By In the News

Cancer care at home could be a boon for health systems that own home-infusion companies, but it would challenge most physician-owned practices. Oncologists are working with Penn Home Infusion Therapy to deliver several other cancer therapies at home. Justin Bekelman, MD, director of the Penn Center for Cancer Care Innovation, believes that up to 10%-20% of cancer patients may be eligible for home treatment in the future. For that to happen, however, payers will have to find ways to incentivize oncologists to choose home infusion, Bekelman said. Read more at Medscape.

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Med Page Today: Op-Ed: Race Has No Place in Precision Oncology

By In the News

by Kelsey S. Lau-Min, MD, Carmen E. Guerra, MD, MSCE, Katherine L. Nathanson, MD, and Justin E. Bekelman, MD Studies show that minority patients with breast cancer are 50% to 65% less likely than white patients to get genetic testing, even if it is free or covered by insurance. Genetic testing is the first step in precision oncology – individualizing treatments based on a person’s hereditary risk or the molecular characteristics of their cancer. A doctor’s recommendation is a singular predictor of whether patients get genetic counseling and testing, surpassing even cost, culture, and patient attitudes. Today, we must reimagine how to help doctors make…

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Godan River: Researchers study pause in cancer screening

By In the News

Multiple studies suggest that fewer cancers were diagnosed last year, likely because of less screening. About 75 cancer organizations recently urged a return to prepandemic screening levels as soon as safely possible. But tumors take years to develop, and some reports suggest that a few months’ delay in screening for certain types of cancer may not have been as bad as feared. For example, researchers in the Netherlands found that a lapse in that country’s mammography program did not lead to more cancers being found at a late stage after screening resumed. The pandemic also bred some creative solutions, such…

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Vice: Why Your ‘True Self’ Is An Illusion

By In the News

The true self is different from the self, which is made up of a blurry combination of your physical appearance, your intelligence, your memories, and your habits, all which change through time. The true self is what people believe is their essence. It’s the core of what makes you you; if it was taken away, you would no longer be you anymore. But though this finding has been repeated many times, the true self is an example of a “folk intuition.” It almost certainly doesn’t exist. What we know from neuroscience and psychology doesn’t provide evidence for a separate and persisting morally…

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Freakonomics: Are You Ready for a Fresh Start?

By In the News

Behavioral scientists have been exploring if — and when — a psychological reset can lead to lasting change. We survey evidence from the London Underground, Major League Baseball, and New Year’s resolutions; we look at accidental fresh starts, forced fresh starts, and fresh starts that backfire. And we wonder: will the pandemic’s end provide the biggest fresh start ever? As a behavior-change specialist, Milkman sees January 1st as something of a high holy day. Every year, roughly half of all Americans make a New Year’s resolution to break some habit, fix some flaw, pick up some new activity. Listen more at Freakonomics.

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News Medical Net: Better nurse work environments associated with improved stroke outcomes

By In the News

In a new study from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing’s (Penn Nursing) Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research (CHOPR), researchers evaluated the association between the nurse work environment and readmission and length of stay for close to 200,000 hospitalized adult ischemic stroke patients in more than 500 hospitals. They found that in hospitals with better nurse work environments, ischemic stroke patients experienced lower odds of 7 and 30-day readmissions and lower lengths of stay. Creating good work environments for nurses is especially important so that they have adequate time to spend with stroke patients and can communicate…

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The Buffalo News: Researchers study impact of pandemic cancer screening pause

By In the News

Millions of colonoscopies, mammograms, lung scans, Pap tests and other cancer screenings were suspended for several months last spring in the United States and elsewhere as COVID-19 swamped medical care. Now researchers are studying the impact, looking to see how many cancers were missed and whether tumors found since then are more advanced. Already, there are hints of trouble. University of Cincinnati researchers found that when CT scans to check for lung cancer resumed in June, 29% of patients had suspicious nodules versus 8% in prior years. Dr. Carmen Guerra had a federal grant to increase screening in racially diverse communities and…

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