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In the News

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3M Inside Angle: How Value-Based Care Does (and Doesn’t) Improve Health Equity

By In the News

From 3M Inside Angle: Let’s face it: Value-based payment models are still a work in progress. How can we create value-based programs so that historically underserved populations, both rural and urban, can experience improved care outcomes? Dive into the topics of health equity, advanced payment model design and more with guest Dr. Amol Navathe, MD, PhD, assistant professor of medical ethics and health policy at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. “I think to truly make gains on equity, we can’t make it an afterthought of how we design policy. In other words, what I think the…

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Penn Medicine News: Text Messaging Shows Promise in Reaching Unvaccinated Patients

By In the News

From Penn Medicine News: Automated text messaging was as effective as direct phone calls in getting unvaccinated patients to seek out a COVID-19 shot, according to a new study from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania that demonstrated the possibility of lower-cost alternatives to traditional patient outreach. The research was published today in JAMA Network Open. “The take-away is that the text arms of our study were comparable to the phone-only arm, but the text messaging is less resource-intensive since a live call center only needs to talk to those who are already interested instead of making cold…

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AJMC: Dr Ravi Parikh Offers Solutions to Barriers During Shift From Fee-for-Service to APMs

By In the News

From AJMC: Ravi B. Parikh, MD, MPP, assistant professor of medical ethics and health policy, assistant professor of medicine, University of Pennsylvania, discusses the partnership between University of Pennsylvania and Tennessee Oncology, as well as the barriers commerical payers and practice partners face in the shift to alternative payment models (APMs) in oncology. Parikh and his co-authors published an article in the March issue of The American Journal of Managed Care®, “Oncology Alternative Payment Models: Lessons From Commercial Insurance.” Listen to the episode at AJMC.

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INSEAD Knowledge: Why the Customer Isn’t Always Right

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From INSEAD Knowledge: We all have the best intentions in life, whether it’s reading more, regularly going to the gym or watching what we eat. But keeping to these goals isn’t always easy or straightforward. Fortunately, a growing number of apps are designed to help us better track and achieve our ambitions. Featuring the gamification of targets and harnessing behavioural techniques such as nudges, prompts and incentives, such apps can help maintain an individual’s focus on hitting their targets. But to what extent do they work, and how can they be engineered for optimal effectiveness? Furthermore, does user behaviour tally with…

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Knowledge at Wharton: How to Build a Better Relationship at the Bargaining Table

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From Knowledge at Wharton: In a recent interview with The Wall Street Journal, powerhouse entertainment executive Shonda Rhimes said, “Never enter a negotiation you’re not willing to walk away from. If you walk in thinking, ‘I can’t walk away,’ then … you’ve already lost.” This all-or-nothing approach has become the standard for what’s considered to be success in negotiations, but it doesn’t have to be. Maurice Schweitzer, a Wharton professor of operations, information, and decisions, has written a paper with Einav Hart, management professor at George Mason University, that answers the question: When can negotiators get the best deal by not squeezing their counterpart? Schweitzer joined Knowledge at…

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Data Skeptic: Haywire Algorithms

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From Data Skeptic: Today, we are joined by Ravi Parikh, a Medical Oncologist and an Assistant Professor at the University of Pennsylvania. He runs a lab that develops and implements machine learning predictive models in clinical care. Ravi discusses his research on how the pandemic has toppled the performance of machine learning models in the medical field. The medical researcher kicked off by establishing how he worked with other specialists such as behavioral scientists, implementation scientists, and end-users to turn medical data into actionable inferences. He emphasized the need for more humans, particularly medical practitioners when building machine learning models in…

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Precision Vaccinations: HIV Vaccine Acceptance Depends on Behavioral and Clinical Success

By In the News

From Precision Vaccinations: The first human trials of mRNA-based vaccines targeted against HIV began earlier this year. And these phase 1 studies are making encouraging progress with patient recruitment. However, epidemiologists and virologists have recently voiced ‘cautious optimism’ about these vaccine candidates’ success. It is also essential to engage behavioral scientists early in vaccine development. Scientists must think about how to place biological solutions within prevailing social norms, stated an article written by Devi Leena Bose on May 16, 2022. Published by the journal Nature, this insightful article is excerpted below. ‘For an HIV vaccine to be acceptable, experts need to strategize…

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Washington Post: How ‘Nudge Economics’ Lets Companies Pass the Buck

By In the News

From The Washington Post: I’ve never been able to decide if the idea that we can “nudge” people into better decision-making that improves the world around them is an optimistic or deeply cynical impulse. On the positive side: it assumes that many a societal problem can have relatively simple solutions, if only we can get people out of their own way. But there is a darker interpretation, too. As behavioral finance economists Nick Chater and George Loewenstein write in a recently released working paper, the mass acceptance of behavioral nudges “unwittingly helped promote the interests of corporations who oppose systemic change.”…

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New York Times: Inflation Anger

By In the News

From The New York Times: Americans are unhappy about the economy. They report less confidence in it than they did at the start of the Covid pandemic, when the unemployment rate was four times as high as it is now. Their feelings toward the economy are almost as low as they were during the depths of the Great Recession in 2008. How is this possible, given that the unemployment rate is low and the economy has rapidly grown over the past two years? The culprit is what Americans describe as one of the most important problems today: high inflation. Inflation stands out from other problems because it…

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Penn Medicine News: Penn Medicine and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Launch Multi-Million Dollar Joint Initiative to Improve Health and Wellbeing in West and Southwest Philadelphia Neighborhoods with Greenspaces, Career Training, and Community Environmental Grants

By In the News

From Penn Medicine News: The Penn Urban Health Lab, along with 13 community and faith-based organizations, will launch Deeply Rooted, a community-driven program to promote health equity and environmental justice in Black and brown neighborhoods in West and Southwest Philadelphia. Named Deeply Rooted to convey the depth, strength, and scope of the work, this initiative will increase greenspace through greening of over 1,000 vacant lots, planting more than 1,000 trees and building miniparks designed by the community. In addition, it will provide community residents and organizations with mini-grants to promote environmental justice initiatives and support nature-based career development. Penn Medicine and Children’s…

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