All Posts By

Meghan Ross

Removing Legal Barriers to Advance Care Planning

By | CHIBEblog

In a Perspective in the New England Journal of Medicine, Joshua Rolnick, a Penn National Clinician/VA Scholar, and LDI Senior Fellows David Asch and Scott Halpern suggest that an advance directive (AD) should be understood primarily as a clinical document, rather than a legal one. The authors argue that the existing legal framework around ADs – a document containing a designated health care decision maker, a living will, or both – creates several impediments to successful advance care planning and does little to prevent disputes over the care provided. The authors identify three major legal limitations to creating, updating, and…

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ScienceNews: Even short-term opioid use can set people up for addiction risks

By | In the News

“Even though a sprained ankle rarely needs an opioid, a new study of emergency room patients found that about 7 percent of patients got sent home with a prescription for the potentially addictive painkiller anyway. And the more pills prescribed, the greater the chance the prescription would be refilled, raising concerns about continued use. The research adds to evidence that it’s hard for some people to stop taking the pills even after a brief use. State officials in New Jersey recently enacted a law limiting first-time prescriptions to a five-day supply, and other states should consider similar restrictions, says Kit…

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Knowledge@Wharton: How behavioral economics could solve America’s health care woes

By | In the News

  Dr. Kevin Volpp was interviewed on the Knowledge@Wharton radio show to discuss the application of behavioral economics to the complex problem of health care reform. Volpp believes that, despite a House of Representatives vote to repeal and replace it, America isn’t done dealing with the Affordable Care Act. He and Dartmouth College economics professor Jonathan Skinner wrote an article in the Journal of the American Medical Association proposing four general principles that should be part of any effort to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.  

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Meet the Behavioral Evidence Hub: Powerful Solutions for Problem-Solvers

By | CHIBEblog

ideas42 is excited to join with Innovations for Poverty Action (IPA) and the Center for Health Incentives & Behavioral Economics at the University of Pennsylvania (CHIBE) in launching the Behavioral Evidence Hub, a comprehensive resource that brings together some of the world’s most promising innovative solutions into a single tool, putting them within easy reach of all those working to solve a wide range of intractable problems affecting the wellbeing and livelihood of people around the world. The website, BHub.org, includes evidence-based initiatives that offer deep insight into tough problems negatively impacting people in the U.S. and globally – from staying…

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Healthcare Finance: Why fee for service should be abolished

By | In the News

In a JAMA Viewpoint article, CHIBE Director of Behavioral Economics, George Loewenstein, and the University of California, Los Angeles’ Ian Larkin outline the problems associated with the fee-for-service arrangements that most doctors currently operate under. Such compensation schemes, they argue, create incentives for physicians to order more, and different, services than are best for patients. Read more in Healthcare Finance, Quartz, 6minutes, and Futurity.

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VICE: Restricting gifts from pharmaceutical reps may influence a doctor’s prescribing habits

By | In the News

New CHIBE research shows that limiting how pharmaceutical sales representatives can market their products to physicians changes their drug prescribing behaviors. A team, led by George Loewenstein, PhD and Ian Larkin, PhD, examined restrictions 19 academic medical centers (AMCs) in five U.S. states placed on pharmaceutical representatives’ visits to doctors’ offices. Published in the May 2 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, the results reveal that the restrictions caused physicians to switch from prescribing drugs that were more expensive and patent-protected to generic, significantly cheaper drugs. Read more in: VICE, Slate Magazine, Yahoo Finance, WESA, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette,…

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Politico, Kaiser Health News: Displaying lab test costs in electronic health records doesn’t deter doctors from ordering them

By | In the News

Patients are stuck for a blood draw almost every day they are admitted to a hospital.  Lab tests are one of the most common orders placed by doctors, but research indicates that nearly one-third of these tests are not needed. Hospitals nationwide are seeking ways to use price transparency – displaying the price of lab tests at the time when doctors are placing the order – to nudge doctors to consider whether the benefits are worth the cost. But, results of a new study by Mitesh Patel, MD, MBA, MS, show that simply displaying the Medicare allowable fees did not…

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New York Times: How behavioral economics can produce better health care

By | In the News

A New York Times Upshot article by Dr. Dhruv Khullar profiles the research of Dr. Kevin Volpp as part of the Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics. Khullar says that “insights [from behavioral economics] might be particularly valuable in health care because medical decision-making is permeated with uncertainty, complexity and emotion — all of which make it hard to weigh our options.”

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