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Meghan Ross

Freakonomics: Are Ambitious People Inherently Selfish?

By | In the News

Featuring Angela Duckworth This podcasts features the following two questions: Question #1: Is it possible to be both self-interested and altruistic at the same time?   Angela talks about her once-ongoing debate with psychologist and Wharton professor Adam Grant. You can learn more about Grant’s perspective on giving in his 2016 TED Talk. Grant was also featured in Freakonomics Radio Ep. 152 “Everybody Gossips (and That’s a Good Thing)” and Ep. 306 “How to Launch a Behavior-Change Revolution.”   Question #2: Why do we habituate to life’s greatest pleasures?   Angela and Stephen discuss Danny Kahneman’s famous study on colonoscopy-related…

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Alison Buttenheim, Daniel Polsky Appointed to National Committee on the Equitable Allocation of COVID-19 Vaccines

By | CHIBEblog

Two CHIBE members have been appointed to an ad hoc committee of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) and the National Academy of Medicine to provide a framework for the equitable allocation of vaccines for the novel coronavirus. CHIBE Associate Director Alison Buttenheim, PhD, MBA, and CHIBE-affiliated faculty member Daniel Polsky, PhD, MPP, are two of the 17 members of the committee. This committee will work together to develop guidance for policymakers in the domestic and global health communities when a COVID-19 vaccine has been created. Some of the questions the committee members will consider, according to…

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STAT: Lower the Cost of Producing Doctors, Not Just the Price of Going to Medical School

By | In the News

By David Asch et al: Medicine has become a profession accessible mainly to the rich. Just look at the price tag for medical school. In the 1960s, the four years of medical education needed to earn an M.D. in the United States could be had for about $40,000 in today’s dollars. The price is now $300,000, a 750% increase. About 70% of students take out loans to pay for medical school, graduating with an average of $200,000 in debt. One in five graduates who finance their medical education with loans accumulate more than $300,000 of debt. That average debt is increasingly concentrated in…

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Freakonomics: Why Are Stories Stickier Than Statistics? (NSQ Ep. 10)

By | In the News

  Angela Duckworth mentions the identifiable victim effect — the idea that a single individual’s story (an identifiable victim) is more compelling than a group of people with the same need (a statistical victim). George Loewenstein, Deborah Small and Jeff Strnad all contributed to the 2005 paper that discusses this theory.   Listen to the full podcast episode at Freakonomics.

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Penn Today: Philadelphia Tax on Sweetened Drinks Led to Drop in Sales

By | In the News

Philadelphia’s tax on sweetened beverages led to a 38.9% drop in the volume of taxed beverages sold at small, independent retailers and a significant increase in the price of taxed beverages, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. This study builds on previous research that suggests beverage taxes can help reduce purchases of sugary drinks, led by Christina Roberto, an associate professor of Medical Ethics and Health Policy at Penn, and senior author on this latest paper published in Health Affairs. “Beverage taxes are a win-win: they decrease purchases of sugary drinks that are…

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MedPage Today: Healthcare Disruptors: Bringing $0 Copays to Self-Insured Plans

By | In the News

Developing an employer-supported insurance plan that’s affordable for both the company and its workers, and that does away with the red tape, surprise bills and other complaints that are now commonplace in U.S. healthcare, may seem like a pipe dream. Enter The Zero Card, a healthcare marketplace and supplemental employee benefit program already in operation that promises a cheaper, streamlined process for employers with self-insured plans for employees. Employers in almost every market “would stand to gain from working with The Zero Card as a complement to their self-insured plans managed by insurance companies,” commented Daniel Polsky, PhD, a health economist…

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The Daily Pennsylvanian: Penn Med Project Looks to See if Spending Time in Nature Can Lessen Postpartum Depression

By | In the News

A new Penn Medicine pilot program aims to find if spending time outdoor spaces can lessen or prevent postpartum depression in new mothers. Nurtured in Nature is a four-week intervention program for women ages 18 and older who had just had a baby and who lived in predominantly Black neighborhoods in Philadelphia. The project was created by Penn Medicine Assistant Professor Dr. Eugenia South, and all research was completed earlier this year before the COVID-19 pandemic hit Philadelphia in early March. “With this program, I am hoping to develop something that will connect women from Black communities to nearby nature in…

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AcademyHealth Recognizes CHIBE Members in Annual Awards

By | CHIBEblog

Congratulations to David Asch, MD, MBA, who has won AcademyHealth’s Distinguished Career Award. AcademyHealth’s highest career award recognizes “leaders who have made significant and lasting contributions to the field of health services research through advancement of science and methods, leadership, mentorship, scholarship and teaching, and the application of health services and policy evidence to improve health and health care.” Dr. Asch was also the PI for the study that won AcademyHealth’s Publication-of-the-Year Award. The NEJM article “Patient Safety Outcomes Under Flexible and Standard Resident Duty-Hour Rules” was authored by (CHIBE members in bold): Jeffrey H. Silber, Lisa M. Bellini, Judy…

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National Palliative Care Research Center Awards Grant to Dr. Ravi Parikh

By | CHIBEblog

The National Palliative Care Research Center (NPCRC) has named CHIBE-affiliated faculty member Ravi Parikh, MD, MPP, a Kornfeld Scholars Program 2020 Grantee. This career development award, according to NPCRC, is given to junior faculty to allow for protected time to develop and conduct the pilot research necessary to be competitive for larger, extramurally funded awards. Dr. Parikh’s project is on machine learning approaches to improve serious illness communication among patients with advanced cancer. The long-term goal of his research program is to “design and evaluate technology-focused interventions to improve palliative care delivery for patients with cancer.” Learn more about the…

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Benefits Pro: Website Design Affects 401(k) Participants’ Decisions

By | In the News

Website design isn’t about making things look pretty—it can be a powerful tool to help employees make better decisions about benefits. Design is not just a “visual garnish,” but instead is “an integral part of any product or service offering. And it’s possible to navigate a path to behaviorally informed designs,” wrote Shlomo Benartzi, a professor of behavioral decision making at UCLA Anderson School of Management and Saurabh Bhargava, an associate professor of economics at Carnegie Mellon University. Their goal was to find a website design that induced employees to contribute more than the default rate, since that’s often not enough for people…

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