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Meghan Ross

Rinad Beidas headshot

Dr. Beidas Advocates for Implementation Research and Mental Health Services in Congressional Briefing

By CHIBEblog

Associate Director of CHIBE Dr. Rinad Beidas was invited by the Friends of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) coalition to participate in a congressional briefing to share information about mental health services and implementation research this July. The title of her talk was: “Investing in implementation science to maximize the impact of scientific discovery: Lessons learned and the way forward.” Dr. Beidas spoke about what implementation science is and why it is important, gave some examples from her team’s NIMH-funded work, and discussed future opportunities. Implementation science offers a set of tools—such as frameworks, methods, and outcomes—that must…

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Bloomberg Businessweek: One Health-Care Company’s Audacious Plan to Lower Costs—and Still Turn a Profit

By In the News

From Bloomberg Businessweek: Oak Street’s [a 9-year-old company seeking to reinvent care for Medicare patients with low incomes and chronic health problems] business model is possible because of the way it gets paid. Doctors and hospitals traditionally have fee-for-service arrangements, where each test, procedure, or hospital trip generates a payment. The most intense specialty care is often the most lucrative. Critics say this system directs too much time and money to expensive, needless services, while other valuable care—such as preventive screening—is neglected. Oak Street and others flip this model through agreements with private plans that receive a monthly per-patient fee…

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vivian lee

CHIBE Q&A with Dr. Vivian Lee

By CHIBEblog

Get to know Vivian Lee, MD, PhD, MBA, President of Health Platforms at Verily Life Sciences and a member of the Center for Health Incentives & Behavioral Economics’ (CHIBE) External Advisory Board through our Q&A! You recently came out with a book called: “The Long Fix: Solving America’s Health Care Crisis with Strategies that Work for Everyone.” If you could snap your fingers and make one change to improve the US health care system, what would you do? With a snap of my fingers, states and the federal government would unite in a shared vision to declare the fixing of…

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The Philadelphia Inquirer: Another toll of the pandemic on kids: More obesity and type 2 diabetes

By In the News

A worrisome consequence is that kids may maintain the extra weight as they grow. “The obesity epidemic was getting worse and worse even before the pandemic,” a CHOP pediatrician said. Researchers across the country are reporting that pediatric obesity and a chronic condition that often goes with it, type 2 diabetes, have spiked since the start of the pandemic, particularly among Black, Hispanic, and low-income children. The reasons seem clear. “Efforts to reduce COVID-19 transmission have likely contributed to worsening pediatric obesity,” researchers from Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia wrote in Pediatrics in May. “Families with children have faced the difficulties…

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CNBC: Why Biden’s Fourth of July vaccination goal will fall short, according to this Wharton professor

By In the News

The country is on track to fall short of President Joe Biden’s goal of getting 70% of American adults to receive one vaccine shot by the Fourth of July. As vaccination rates plateau, companies and community groups are trying all sorts of incentives but those efforts are less effective on the population that’s still unvaccinated, according to Wharton professor Iwan Barankay. The president said he hoped Independence Day would mark a turning point in the pandemic. And yet, inoculation efforts in some states have hit a wall even as the delta variant of the disease spreads rapidly across the country. From…

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Roll Call: Medicaid beneficiaries less likely to get COVID-19 shots

By In the News

A combination of factors is keeping enrollees from getting vaccinated, even with states offering big-money incentives. A nationwide poll also showed higher levels of vaccine hesitancy among lower-income individuals. The poll, released in mid-June by the African American Research Collaborative and the Commonwealth Fund, found that 45 percent of individuals earning under $50,000 said they were both unvaccinated and hesitant to get vaccinated. That number dropped to 35 percent for individuals earning $50,000 to $79,000 and to 26 percent for those earning more than $80,000. Businesses nationwide offer vaccinated individuals everything from free beer and doughnuts to a chance at…

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PhillyVoice: Philly Vax Sweepstakes awards cash prizes to first group of winners

By In the News

The Philly Vax Sweepstakes aims to increase COVID-19 vaccination rates across the city, giving greater prize odds to ZIP codes with the lowest vaccination numbers. Philadelphia’s experiment incentivizing COVID-19 vaccination has paid off for the first 12 winners of the city’s ongoing sweepstakes, rewarding immunized city residents with cash prizes ranging from $1,000 to $50,000. City officials announced Friday that the winner of one of the two $50,000 prizes is 53-year-old Daniel Silva, an Oak Lane resident, who said he had been wavering about whether or not to get vaccinated. Funding for the Philly Vax Sweepstakes is provided by the…

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Healio: Patients with cancer achieve response to messenger RNA COVID-19 vaccine

By In the News

A high percentage of patients undergoing treatment for cancer achieved a sufficient antibody response to the BNT162b2 messenger RNA COVID-19 vaccine, according to study results published in JAMA Oncology. Researchers found that at 13 to 54 days after the second vaccine dose, 90% of patients with cancer (n = 92 of 102) and 100% of healthy controls were seropositive for COVID-19 antispike IgG antibodies. Patients with cancer had a significantly lower median IgG titer than controls (1,931 AU/mL vs. 7,160 AU/mL; P < .001). Results of a multivariable analysis showed treatment with chemotherapy plus immunotherapy was the only variable significantly associated with lower…

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The New York Times: The Pandemic Seems to Have Made Childhood Obesity Worse, but There’s Hope

By In the News

Childhood obesity has increased significantly in the United States during the past four decades. In 1980, about 5 percent of the country’s children between 2 and 19 were experiencing obesity, according to the C.D.C.; as of 2018, more than 19 percent were — and an additional 16 percent were considered overweight. Because children are far more likely to gain an unhealthful amount of weight while out of school over the summer, experts were worried last spring when in-person schooling was suspended indefinitely because of the pandemic. Black and Latino children, as well as those from families with lower incomes, displayed sharper increases…

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Strategy + Business: Four common biases in boardroom culture

By In the News

Applying the principles of behavioral psychology in the workplace is a popular trend in the corporate world for good reason. Building on foundational work by Nobel laureate Daniel Kahneman, George Loewenstein, Richard Thaler, and others, behavioral psychology offers valuable insights into the biases that help the brain order information and make decisions, and that influence the ways people judge themselves and others. In business settings, such as a meeting of a corporate board, these biases can cause people to over- or undervalue others who sit around the table, or the ideas they express. They can also influence collegiality, whether people…

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