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Mitesh Patel Comments on Wearables Weight Loss Studies

By | In the News

NPR, Men’s Journal, September 20, 2016 In interviews with NPR and Men’s Journal, Mitesh Patel, MD, MBA, MS comments on a recent study at the University of Pittsburgh, which found that a group of people who were given fitness trackers while dieting and exercising lost more weight than a group who self-reported their activity – even though their activity levels were equivalent. “There aren’t many — if any — long-term studies of wearable tech,” Dr. Patel told NPR. This study is the longest yet, “and that’s why this research is important. We need more studies like this to show what…

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Warning Labels May Discourage Teens from Purchasing Sugary Drinks

By | In the News

Source: Forbes, New York Daily News, Philly.com, U.S. News & World Report,  Knowledge@Wharton Radio, Times of India, American Heart Association, Nutrition Insight, Penn Medicine News, Health Day, Daily Mail, Healthy Food America, PreventObesity.Net, ElEconomista.es, Pourqui Docteur,  AJMC, India TV News, Medical Xpress, Beverage Daily, LDI Health Policy$ense, September 8, 2016 Teens are more than 15 percent less likely to say they would purchase soft drinks and other sugary drinks that include health warning labels, according to a new CHIBE study conducted by Christina Roberto, PhD and Eric Van Epps, PhD of the Psychology of Eating and Consumer Health Lab. The…

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CHIBE Forges Research Partnership with National University of Singapore

By | In the News

Source: Penn LDI eMagazine, August 2016 Penn LDI reports: “In a new international partnership, the University of Pennsylvania’s LDI Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics (CHIBE) and the National University of Singapore (NUS) will jointly conduct a series of behavioral economics studies. CHIBE Director Kevin Volpp said ‘The similarity between the issues faced in Singapore and in the US in terms of switches in provider payment toward value and concerns about the role of non-communicable diseases such as obesity and diabetes as a major driver of health costs and poor outcomes is remarkable. We are excited about the possibility of this…

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Patients More Likely to Take Medications When Refills are Synced

By | In the News

Source: Kaiser Health News, Science Daily, Specialty Pharmacy Times, Long-Term Living Magazine, The Bulletin,  Penn Medicine News, August 8, 2016 A CHIBE study published today in Health Affairs found that a refill synchronization program – in which patients received all prescription refills at the same time – increased medication adherence by an average of three to five percent compared to a control group. Researchers found that refill synchronization had the greatest impact on patients who were least likely to take their medication before the intervention, increasing medication adherence in this subgroup by nine to thirteen percent over the control group….

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Conditions Worse Than Death as Rated by the Seriously Ill

By | In the News

Source: The Economist, WHYY, WBUR, Fox News, Philly.com, Medscape, LDI Health Policy$ense, Live Science, August 1, 2016 Research from CHIBE’s Fostering Improvement in End-of-Life Decision Science (FIELDS) program was highlighted in The Economist after the publication of a JAMA Internal Medicine article entitled, “States Worse Than Death Among Hospitalized Patients with Serious Illnesses.” The magazine wrote: “Asking people approaching, or threatened with death, how they feel about it, and the moment at which they would like it to come, is a welcome development. Both sides of the doctor-assisted-dying debate should pay attention to it.”

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Ordering Food in Advance Leads to Healthier Choices

By | In the News

Source: New York Times, Consumer Reports, Science Alert, New York Magazine, July 25, 2016 The New York Times profiled CHIBE’s study, “Advance Ordering for Healthier Eating? Field Experiments on the Relationship Between the Meal Order–Consumption Time Delay and Meal Content,” recently published in the Journal of Marketing Research. CHIBE Postdoctoral Fellow Eric VanEpps told the Times, “If a decision is going to be implemented immediately, we just care about the immediate consequences, and we discount the long-term costs and benefits. In the case of food, we care about what’s happening right now – like how tasty it is – but…

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Employee Exercise Increases with Competition and Financial Incentives

By | In the News

Source: Live Science, Penn Medicine News, July 15, 2016 A new CHIBE research study published in American Journal of Health Promotion found that comparing performance to average peers and offering financial incentives was the most effective method for increasing physical activity among teams of employees. “Many employers are using workplace competitions and financial incentives to encourage physical activity and other healthy behaviors among their employees,” says Mitesh Patel, MD, MBA, MS, lead author of the study. The research team’s findings demonstrate that these efforts can be successful when behavioral economics principles are applied.

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Kevin Volpp Comments on IBC Workplace Walking Study

By | In the News

Source: Reuters, July 7, 2016 Researchers at Independence Blue Cross compared workplace walking programs with and without “enhanced” features and found participants in the enhanced programs logged more steps, lost more weight and reported more improvement in energy and mood. Kevin Volpp commented that “it’s hard to know which part of the program was really the key ingredient to improvement. The challenge with these interventions is to disentangle the pieces of the intervention, to figure out which components, like feedback and incentives, had an impact.”

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Heather Schofield Study Shows Muslims Less Productive During Ramadan

By | In the News

Source: The Economist,  July 2, 2016 An Economist article discussing Ramadan’s negative economic effect on Muslim countries mentions Heather Schofield’s research suggesting that Muslims are less productive during Ramadan. The study found  that fasting by Indian agriculture workers led to a 20-40% drop in productivity when the holy month fell in the planting or harvesting season. Office workers are said to put off meetings and decisions until after Ramadan, during which trading activity tends to decline on stockmarkets in the Middle East.

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