Selected Tag

CHIBE Pilot Project

All Tags 89


Learning How Behavioral Economics Impacts Health Decisions

    • Quit Smoking
    • senior couple on walk
    • laptop computer
    • Seated Exercise
    • Ladies Swimming
  • Previous
  • Next

Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics Research

CHIBE researchers apply concepts from the field of behavioral economics to design, implement, and evaluate interventions that improve health and build knowledge about efficacy, cost and effectiveness. 

Basic Science Core Request for Applications

The Basic Science Core aims to support laboratory or low-cost field studies that will shed light on mechanisms that can generate behavior change.  In contrast to previous large-scale field studies, which have often combined multiple mechanisms into one intervention in order to maximize impact on behavior, basic science projects supported by the Core focus on disentangling and precisely identifying the impacts of individual mechanisms.  CHIBE researchers interested in applying for project support can click here for more information.

 

 

Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics Research Studies

You are viewing 2 posts with the tag CHIBE Pilot Project

Payments to Physicians

Principal Investigator: Abrams 

There is concern in the medical community that payments to physicians by pharmaceutical companies may distort prescribing behavior, whether through a conscious or unconscious mechanism. By combining a proprietary dataset covering 80 million individual prescriptions with payment data collected by state agencies the goal of this research is to produce the first empirical estimates of the relationship between pharma payments and prescription choice.

Funder: LDI CHIBE Pilot Project


Financial Incentives in Surveys of Healthcare Providers: Lotteries versus Guaranteed Payments

Principal Investigators: Halpern / Volpp 

Co-investigator:  Asch

This study will evaluate the relative efficacy of guaranteed payments (either up-front or conditional on response) vs. lotteries (in which respondents are entered into a random drawing for a larger reward) in increasing healthcare provider response to surveys. This study comprises 3 independent randomized trials of actuarially equivalent payments and lotteries.

Funded by: Greenwall Foundation and University of Pennsylvania, LDI CHIBE Pilot Project