All Tags 89



Learning How Behavioral Economics Impacts Health Decisions

    • Quit Smoking
    • senior couple on walk
    • laptop computer
    • Seated Exercise
    • Ladies Swimming
  • Previous
  • Next

Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics Research

CHIBE researchers apply concepts from the field of behavioral economics to design, implement, and evaluate interventions that improve health and build knowledge about efficacy, cost and effectiveness. 

Basic Science Core Request for Applications

The Basic Science Core aims to support laboratory or low-cost field studies that will shed light on mechanisms that can generate behavior change.  In contrast to previous large-scale field studies, which have often combined multiple mechanisms into one intervention in order to maximize impact on behavior, basic science projects supported by the Core focus on disentangling and precisely identifying the impacts of individual mechanisms.  CHIBE researchers interested in applying for project support can click here for more information.

 

 

Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics Research Studies

You are viewing all posts

Choice Architecture and Organ Donation

Principal Investigators: Judd Kessler, PhD; Alvin Roth

This project will investigate how choice architecture affects decisions to register as organ donors among a representative sample of residents from the state of Massachusetts.

Funded by: Medical Ethics and Health Policy

 

Tags: Judd Kessler

The Fresh Start Effect: Temporal Landmarks Motivate Healthy Behaviors

Principal Investigators: Katherine Milkman, PhD; Jason Riis, PhD; Hengchen Dai

This project will determine what types of life transition and calendar events or temporal landmarks are most likely to motivate healthy behaviors and how to leverage these temporal landmarks to enhance peoples’ engagement in healthy activities.

Funder: NIA Penn Roybal Center on Behavioral Economics and Health


Incentives, Information, and Impulse: A Field Experiment on Food Choice

Principal Investigator: Saurabh Bhargava, PhD

The research objective of the study is to understand the factors that influence how families choose the food they consume and to identify strategies that can be used to improve such choices.  While existing research has been largely limited to short-run assessments in experimental restaurants and the laboratory, this project aims to investigate the economic and psychological determinants of food choice using a large and novel panel dataset of actual food purchases and a series of randomized experiments on real-world consumers through collaboration with the world’s largest online food delivery firm.  Specifically, the project seeks to understand the role of financial stress on food choice through analysis of archival data, and the role of (i) Incentives, (ii) Information (and the context within which such information is provided), and (iii) Impulsivity on food choice through a series of field experiments.

Funder: NIA Penn Roybal Center on Behavioral Economics and Health


Eating Phenotypes for Childhood Obesity in the Context of Familial Obesity Risk

Principal Investigator: Tanja Kral

The aim of this study is to test the effects of three different types of breakfast on appetite, food intake, and cognitive performance in 8- to 10-year-old children. Using an integrated approach, this research aims to study multiple child eating traits concurrently under states of hunger and satiety. It will examine the impact of short-term appetite and intake regulation on longer-term energy intake control and weight development in a cohort of ethnically diverse normal-weight and obese boys and girls with different familial predispositions to obesity.

Funder: NIH/NIDDK

Tags: Tanja Kral

Effects of Commercial Insurer Payment Policy on Chemotherapy Use and Costs

Principal Investigator: Justin Bekelman

Over the past several years, a large, national commercial insurer implemented reimbursement changes to incentivize the use of generic chemotherapies, presenting a natural experiment which we will leverage to examine the effects of chemotherapy reimbursement policy changes on treatment patterns, quality and costs.

Funder: American Cancer Society


Understand Health Insurance and Policy Using Massachusetts Health Reform

Principal Investigator: Jonathan Kolstad

Understand Health Insurance and Policy Using Massachusetts Health Reform

Funder: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

 


The Role of Behavioral Economic Incentive Design and Demographic Characteristics in Financial-Incentive Based Approaches to Changing Health Behaviors

Prinicpal Investigators: Nancy Haff, Mitesh Patel, Kevin Volpp

Financial incentives are increasingly being used to promote health behavior change.  The role of participant demographic characteristics and incentive structure has not been well studied.  In this meta-analysis, participant-level data was pooled from previously published studies using financial incentives to promote health behavior change and associations between the effectiveness of financial incentives, demographic characteristics, and incentive structure were evaluated.


Using Smartphones to Track Health Data: A Qualitative Analysis

Principal Investigator: Mitesh Patel

Smartphones and wearable devices are increasingly being used by individuals to track health data such as physical activity.  In this study, over 1000 participants who used a smartphone to track step counts for three months were asked to report their perceptions on using these devices to track health data.

Funder: NIH Institute on Aging

 

Tags: Mitesh Patel

Team-Based Approaches for Physical Activity to Compare Social Norms Feedback With and Without Forgiveness: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

Principal Investigators: Mitesh Patel, David Asch, Kevin Volpp

Increased physical activity has been found to be associated with lower rates of all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and stroke.  Yet, more than 50% of adults in the United States do not meet the national guidelines for minimum levels of physical activity to achieve health benefits.  This randomized, controlled trial enrolled teams of four members each who were given the goal of walking at least 7,000 steps per day.  Each team received different types of social norms feedback on their performance and outcomes were compared for groups that received feedback that accounted for all seven days of the week or forgave the two lowest days of activity, counting only 5 of 7 days per week.

Funder: NIH Institute on Aging


 


Team-Based Approaches for Physical Activity Using Financial Incentives and Social Norms Feedback: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

Principal Investigators: Mitesh Patel, David Asch, Kevin Volpp

Increased physical activity has been found to be associated with lower rates of all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and stroke.  Yet, more than 50% of adults in the United States do not meet the national guidelines for minimum levels of physical activity to achieve health benefits.  This randomized, controlled trial enrolled teams of four members each who were given the goal of walking at least 7,000 steps per day.  Each team received different types of social norms feedback on their performance and outcomes were compared with and without financial incentives.

Funder: NIH Institute on Aging

 


CDC Prevention Research Center

Directors: Karen Glanz, PhD, MPH; Kevin Volpp, MD, PhD

A five-year, $4,350,000 grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has established a Prevention Research Center (PRC) at the University of Pennsylvania. The PRC, one of 26 in the nation, will conduct innovative public health and disease management research aimed at preventing chronic disease and reducing health disparities in Southeastern Pennsylvania. This will be the first PRC in Philadelphia.

Among other initiatives, the PRC will conduct a workplace weight loss study to evaluate environmental change strategies and incentives for decreasing obesity and preventing cardiovascular disease in employees of the City of Philadelphia, Independence Blue Cross, and the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA).


Process Versus Outcomes Incentives for Lipid Management

Principal Investigators: Peter Reese, MD; Kevin Volpp, MD, PhD

Financial incentives have been shown to be effective at improving patient health behaviors including medication adherence in a wide variety of contexts. The delivery of such incentives has been enhanced by the recent development of new wireless technologies that facilitate the measurement of daily medication adherence and the provision of incentives in an automated fashion. However, the relative effectiveness of incentives based on process (e.g. statin adherence) versus outcome (e.g. improvements in LDL cholesterol) is unknown.This is a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the relative effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of improving cholesterol levels among participants who are at high risk of CVD and who have elevated LDL cholesterol levels by testing process versus outcomes financial incentives. 

Funder: National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute


Donor Registration Trial

Principal Investigator: Peter Reese, MD

This Roybal pilot is a randomized, controlled trial to compare the effects of four interventions on the rate of organ donor registration by members of the general public who visit the DMV website for business unrelated to organ donor registration.

Funded by: Roybal P30 Pilot


A Pilot Intervention of an MI-Informed SMS Intervention For Poorly Controlled Type II Diabetes

Principal Investigators: Judith Long, MD; Ilona Lorincz, MD

This project will develop and pilot a three month randomized control trial (RCT) of a Motivational Interviewing (MI)‐informed SMS intervention tailored to patient level of activation in a population of patients with poorly controlled type II diabetes. The pilot will inform the development of a larger RCT, powered to detect a change in glycemic control.

Funded By: Roybal P30 Pilot


Retail pharmacy vouchers to promote Tdap vaccination for adults living with infants

Principal Investigators: Alison Buttenheim, Kristen Feemster

The goal of this study is to assess the feasibility, acceptability, and impact of vouchers and a high-salience celebrity PSA  on uptake of Tdap vaccination for adult caregivers of infants.

Funder: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health & Society Scholars Program Research Grants in Population Health and Leonard Davis Institute Health Services Research Pilot Grant


Can policies change norms? Measuring school vaccine exemption norms in the context of regulatory change

Principal Investigator: Alison Buttenheim

The goal of this study is to assess school-level norms related to exemptions from vaccine mandates prior to change in California’s exemption law.


Improving participation in vector control campaigns through behavioral economics

Principal Investigators: Alison Buttenheim, Michael Levy

The goal of this study is to increase participation in a Chagas disease vector control campaign in urban Peru through lotteries, advance commitment responsive scheduling, and peer recruitment. The study takes a  behavioral design approach to identify specific behavioral barriers and address them through novel interventions informed by behavioral economic theory. 

Funder: University of Pennsylvania Global Engagement Fund and University Research Foundation


Evaluation of a Workplace Wellness Program Implementation

Principal Investigator: Scott Halpern

We propose to develop an evidence base regarding best practices in workplace wellness program implementation by leveraging a unique opportunity: an evaluation of 6 of KKR’s portfolio companies, within which we will determine which program features are most effective for improving employee cardiovascular health. Differences in program feature implementation, and in incentive size and structure, offer considerable potential for determining how and for whom wellness programs work.

Funder: AHA


Program in Behavioral Economics and End-of-Life Decisions

Principal Investigators: Scott Halpern

This grant provides initial support for development of a new research program seeking to (1) understand how choice architecture influences end-of-life care decisions, (2) develop interventions based on this understanding that improve the quality of end-of-life care while reducing its costs, and (3) develop new paradigms for thinking about end-of-life decision making.

Funder: Otto Haas Charitable Trust


Behavioral Economics to improve Advance Care OptioNs (BEACON)

Principle Investigators: Scott Halpern, Mark Vogel

This is a randomized trial of endowment effects and focusing effects to increase completion of advance directives and rates of discussions of end-of-life care preferences between patients and family members. The study population consists of recently hospitalized older adults who have been discharged home with the use of home health care services provided by Reverence Home Health Care in Michigan.

Funder: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation