CHIBE in the News

LDI eMagazine: Penn Behavioral Economics Research Team Wins $600,000 Donaghue Grant

By | In the News

A behavioral economics research team led by Penn Medicine’s Amol Navathe and Mitesh Patel has received a $600,000 grant from the Donaghue Foundation to conduct studies evaluating two different potential ways to reduce physicians’ opioid prescribing. The large project will involve 50 emergency departments and urgent care centers affiliated with 24 hospitals operated by the Sutter Health System throughout northern California. Called “The REDUCE Trial,” the three-year project will test if electronic health records default options can be used to effectively decrease the number of opioid pills physicians prescribe, and, if monthly reports comparing each physician’s opioid prescribing patterns with those of his or…

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Duke Health Policy: Healthcare Consumers Find Little Information Online

By | In the News

Trying to be an informed healthcare consumer in the United States is harder than you might think, according to researchers from the Duke-Margolis Center for Health Policy. When consumers search for healthcare prices online, only 17 percent of sites provide information on the price of common procedures, making it difficult for patients without insurance, who have high-deductible plans, or whose plans include other kinds of cost sharing to determine how much their care will cost and what they will pay out of pocket. The study’s conclusions, published today as a research letter in JAMA internal medicine, are based on a systematic…

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KSDK St. Louis: Does it work to dangle a carrot for patients to take healthy steps?

By | In the News

Patricia Alexander knew she needed a mammogram but just couldn’t find the time. “Every time I made an appointment, something would come up,” said Alexander, 53, who lives in Moreno Valley, Calif. Over the summer, her doctor’s office, part of Vantage Medical Group, promised her a $25 Target gift card if she got the exam. Alexander, who’s insured through Medi-Cal, California’s version of the Medicaid program for lower-income people, said that helped motivate her to make a new appointment — and keep it. Health plans, medical practices and some Medicaid programs are increasingly offering financial incentives to motivate Medicaid patients…

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Standard Digital: How ‘medicines first’ HIV policy is changing sex in Kenya

By | In the News

The World Aids Day observed yesterday also marked the fifth year since the US adopted a ‘medicines first’ HIV policy for Kenya and other donor recipient countries. Titled ‘Dollars to Results’ the policy has led to what doctors are calling over medicalisation of sex through HIV. The policy overseen by USAid since 2013, champions a model where pharmaceutical commodities represent top priority followed by treatment in which category fall health workers and medical infrastructure. At the bottom are behaviour change HIV prevention activities, which were anchored on abstention and faithfulness. The policy has partly been instrumental in doubling the number…

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Fierce Healthcare: Humana’s wellness program features a small but committed group of wearables users

By | In the News

Of the nearly 4.5 million people enrolled in Humana’s wellness program, just 1.2% used an activity tracker. But the majority of those that did activate a device continued using it for six months, according to a new study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine that offers the first robust evaluation of wearables within wellness programs. In one of the largest studies of wearables usage to date, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania combed through two years of data from HumanaVitality, now known as Go365. They discovered that although initial usage of activity trackers barely broke 1%, 80% of those that did engage…

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Knowledge@Wharton: Can Firms Help Employees Make Better Retirement Choices?

By | In the News

Retirement savings plans have been in the news lately as Republicans eyed limits on the maximum pretax 401(k) contributions as a way to fund the cuts outlined in their tax proposal. The 401(k) plan has over the last two decades become the dominant way that Americans save for retirement, replacing the traditional pension. But employers may not be doing as much as they can to encourage employees to use 401(k)s to adequately prepare for the end of their working years. Many employers automatically enroll workers in 401(k) plans and set a default savings level, which puts the onus on employees…

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Fortune: How Can We Help People Quit Smoking? Pay Them.

By | In the News

Thursday is the 47th year of the American Cancer Society’s Great American Smokeout. One of the longest-running awareness campaigns in the U.S., the Smokeout involves cancer societies, health organizations, and anti-smoking advocates using social and print media to remind Americans that now is the right time to quit. Each year Americans are subjected to over 200 national health awareness days, weeks, or months. These campaigns cover everything from autism to appropriate use of hospital linens. They are certainly effective in raising awareness over their target issues, a necessary first step in shifting our habits. But awareness campaigns can only be effective…

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Reuters: Lower Medicaid fees linked to scarcer primary care appointments

By | In the News

When the fees paid to healthcare providers by the Medicaid insurance program for the poor go up, appointments with primary care doctors suddenly become more available to Medicaid beneficiaries – and the opposite happens when fees go down, according to a recent U.S. study. Researchers found that, overall, every $10 change up or down in the Medicaid fees paid to providers led to a 1.7 percent change in the same direction in the proportion of patients on Medicaid who could secure an appointment with a new doctor. Based on these trends, reductions in Medicaid funding that lead to lower physician…

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Penn Spotlight: In the Quest for Lasting Behavior Change, Two Researchers Lead the Charge

By | In the News

Have you ever made a commitment to exercise more often? You sign up with a gym and succeed for a time but soon, too soon, the enthusiasm fades. Eventually, your workout clothes gather dust and your gym membership does nothing but empty your wallet. In the short term, changing behavior is doable, even exciting, but it’s really hard to make that change permanent. Ask anyone who has ever tried to quit smoking or eat less junk food. There’s a reason the phrase, “You can’t teach an old dog new tricks” exists within popular vernacular. But Penn researchers Angela Duckworth and Katherine Milkman, along…

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LDI eMagazine: Photo Page – 2017 Penn/CMU Roybal Behavioral Economics Retreat

By | In the News

The 10th annual University of Pennsylvania/Carnegie Mellon University Roybal Behavioral Economics Retreat convened at the Skytop Lodge and Conference Center here in the Poconos. In the Evergreen Ballroom (above), Associate Professor at Penn’s School of Nursing and LDI Senior Fellow Alison Buttenheim, PhD, MBA, leads a workshop on behavioral studies design. Two organizations collaborate in the ongoing NIH P30 Center of Excellence Roybal research program: Penn’s Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics (CHIBE), and CMU’s Center for Behavioral and Decision Research (CBDR).   Skytop Lodge (above, left) is a massive complex that sits atop a Pocono plateau and hides much of its bulk underground….

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