CHIBE in the News

Philly Voice: Penn medical school alum confronts what ‘no one wants to talk about’ in new podcast

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Philly Voice highlights Dr. Lauren Kelly, a recent graduate of the Perelman School of the University of Pennsylvania, began producing her own podcast, “When I Die, Let Me Live”, that explores how we talk about death.  “I’m on a journey to talk about the one thing that no one wants to talk about,” Kelly says in the first episode. “Death is something that happens to all of us, yet it hardly comes up.” The idea for “When I Die, Let Me Live,” became realized with support from Scott Halpern, director of the Fostering Improvement in End-of-Life Decision Science (FIELDS) Program…

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New York Times: There’s no magical savings in showing prices to doctors

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A New York Times article highlights a recent study from Mitesh Patel, in which physicians were exposed to a price transparency intervention when ordering laboratory tests. As the Times writes, “The researchers suspected that in the group seeing the prices, there would be a decrease in the number of tests ordered each day per patient, and that spending on these tests would go down. This didn’t happen. Over the course of a year, there were no meaningful or consistent changes in ordering by the doctors; revealing the prices didn’t change what they did much at all.”

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Fast Company: Want to employ behavioral science for good? Here’s a helpful collection of ideas

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Fast Company takes a look at B-Hub, a collaborative online platform built by CHIBE, ideas42 and Innovations for Poverty Action to provide policy-relevant behavioral insights in an easy to digest format. The article says that “Crucially, the database doesn’t just link to what’s been previously published elsewhere—everything has been painstakingly reformatted to shares costs, challenges, impact, and results, and real-life examples of what the each “nudge” actually looked like.”

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Society for Human Resource Management: Interactive engagement promotes healthy behavior

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A new article from the Society for Human Resource Management outlines the importance of evidence-based incentive programs to motivate healthy behaviors: “We are on the cusp of a new era in health care communication, believes Kevin Volpp, M.D., a pioneer in researching how people respond to efforts to engage them in achieving better health.”  

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Knowledge@Wharton: How behavioral economics could solve America’s health care woes

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  Dr. Kevin Volpp was interviewed on the Knowledge@Wharton radio show to discuss the application of behavioral economics to the complex problem of health care reform. Volpp believes that, despite a House of Representatives vote to repeal and replace it, America isn’t done dealing with the Affordable Care Act. He and Dartmouth College economics professor Jonathan Skinner wrote an article in the Journal of the American Medical Association proposing four general principles that should be part of any effort to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.  

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Healthcare Finance: Why fee for service should be abolished

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In a JAMA Viewpoint article, CHIBE Director of Behavioral Economics, George Loewenstein, and the University of California, Los Angeles’ Ian Larkin outline the problems associated with the fee-for-service arrangements that most doctors currently operate under. Such compensation schemes, they argue, create incentives for physicians to order more, and different, services than are best for patients. Read more in Healthcare Finance, Quartz, 6minutes, and Futurity.

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VICE: Restricting gifts from pharmaceutical reps may influence a doctor’s prescribing habits

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New CHIBE research shows that limiting how pharmaceutical sales representatives can market their products to physicians changes their drug prescribing behaviors. A team, led by George Loewenstein, PhD and Ian Larkin, PhD, examined restrictions 19 academic medical centers (AMCs) in five U.S. states placed on pharmaceutical representatives’ visits to doctors’ offices. Published in the May 2 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, the results reveal that the restrictions caused physicians to switch from prescribing drugs that were more expensive and patent-protected to generic, significantly cheaper drugs. Read more in: VICE, Slate Magazine, Yahoo Finance, WESA, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette,…

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Politico, Kaiser Health News: Displaying lab test costs in electronic health records doesn’t deter doctors from ordering them

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Patients are stuck for a blood draw almost every day they are admitted to a hospital.  Lab tests are one of the most common orders placed by doctors, but research indicates that nearly one-third of these tests are not needed. Hospitals nationwide are seeking ways to use price transparency – displaying the price of lab tests at the time when doctors are placing the order – to nudge doctors to consider whether the benefits are worth the cost. But, results of a new study by Mitesh Patel, MD, MBA, MS, show that simply displaying the Medicare allowable fees did not…

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