News

Reuters: Young diabetics may check sugar more when money’s at stake

Teens and young adults with diabetes may do a better job of checking their blood sugar when they get daily financial incentives than when there’s no cash on the line, a recent experiment suggests. Researchers tested out the potential for money to motivate young people to test blood sugar daily by offering $60 a month up front and then subtracting $2 for each day a participant didn’t follow through on required testing. For three months, researchers randomly selected 90 teens and young adults to get these cash incentives or no reward at all. Overall, the youth with money at stake…

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LDI Symposium Highlights Promising Behavioral Solutions to Public Health Challenges

Earlier this month, our founding partner, the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, celebrated 50 years of research with a symposium drawing together some of the brightest minds in health policy. At a panel focused on the potential for behavioral science to influence health care, CHIBE Director Kevin Volpp, MD, PhD joined External Advisory Board member Robert Galvin, MD, Internal Advisory Board member Barbara Kahn, PhD, MBA, MPhil and renowned Duke University behavioral economist Peter Ubel, MD to outline behavioral solutions that address premature mortality in the United States. The panel, moderated by Internal Advisory Board member David Asch, MD,…

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Undark: Putting Digital Health Monitoring Tools to the Test

PHYSICIANS CALL IT the 5,000-hour problem. If you have a common chronic condition such as cardiovascular disease or diabetes, the expert in charge of your health for almost all of your 5,000 waking hours annually is — you. And, frankly, you won’t always make the best choices. “The behavior changes that are necessary to address chronic disease are much more in your hands than in the doctor’s,” points out Stacey Chang, executive director of the Design Institute for Health at Dell Medical School in Austin, Texas. “To cede that control to the doctor sometimes is actually counterproductive.” With that in mind,…

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When Push Comes to Nudge

Imagine if health care costs could be dramatically reduced, and outcomes improved without any heavy lifting – no bills would need to be passed, no policies approved, and no major restructuring required. What if we could simply will people to make decisions that resulted in better care and a healthier population? “Decisions are affected by emotions, bias, social context. The solution is design,” David Asch, MD, MBA, executive director of Penn’s Center for Health Care Innovation, recently said at the Healthcare Financial Management Association’s annual conference. The idea that better decisions can be made simply by guiding people to them…

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MedPage Today: Triple Attack on Drug Nonadherence Still Fails in Post-AMI Setting

MedPage Today discusses the results of a study done by Kevin Volpp, Director of the Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics, Dr. Shivan Mehta, Dr. David Asch, Dr. Andrea Troxel, among many others affiliated with the center. The study was done to determine if there were any statistical differences in hospitalizations based on an intervention combining wireless pill bottles, lottery-based incentives, and social support among acute myocardial infarction (MI) survivors. Unfortunately, this study showed that a system of medication reminders using financial incentives and social support did not improve medication adherence. Read the original JAMA article here. Read more…

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Fast Company: Want to employ behavioral science for good? Here’s a helpful collection of ideas

Fast Company takes a look at B-Hub, a collaborative online platform built by CHIBE, ideas42 and Innovations for Poverty Action to provide policy-relevant behavioral insights in an easy to digest format. The article says that “Crucially, the database doesn’t just link to what’s been previously published elsewhere—everything has been painstakingly reformatted to shares costs, challenges, impact, and results, and real-life examples of what the each “nudge” actually looked like.”

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Hardwiring Patient Engagement to Deliver Better Health

Providers often throw up their hands in frustration when they see the same patients repeatedly readmitted to the hospital for behaviors such as failing to take their medications at home or eating a high salt diet when they have heart failure. Many acute exacerbations of chronic disease are from patients having trouble following through with provider recommendations — whether to eat healthy foods, watch fluid balance, take medications, lose weight, quit smoking, or avoid alcohol or other drugs. Generally, the standard approaches clinicians take to address these issues, such as cajoling or providing information in a brief face-to-face encounter, don’t…

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Shivan Mehta Comments on Text Messaging Study

Source: The Wall Street Journal, June 30, 2016 Shivan Mehta, Associate Chief Innovation Officer at the Center for Healthcare Innovation, commented on a study conducted in Australia that suggests text messages could reduce one’s odds of a second heart attack. Mehta noted that the length of the Australian study was important because earlier studies have been conducted over a period of three months or less and the first six months after a heart attack are a high-risk period during which new health habits are formed. He also commented that the Australian study targeted multiple risk factors concurrently—smoking, exercise, diet and general cardiovascular awareness, rather…

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CHIBE and CHOP Partner to Address Juvenile Diabetes through Way to Health Platform

Source: Bench to Bedside (CHOP), June/July 2016 Researchers from CHIBE and the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) are collaborating with the goal of improving teens’ glycemic control through behavioral economics. Their research has been made possible through the use of CHIBE’s innovative Way to Health platform. CHOP reports: “The platform automates many of the research functions necessary to perform these sorts of behavioral economic randomized controlled trials using devices such as wireless activity trackers and other mobile health applications.”

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