Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics News Archive

You are viewing 32 posts with the tag Scott Halpern

CHIBE Behavioral Economics Symposium Closes Seven-Year Research Program

Source: LDI eMagazine, January 3, 2017

The University of Pennsylvania LDI Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics' 2016 Behavioral Economics and Health Symposium was both a spotlight on the latest research work as well as the conclusion of a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Donaghue Foundation funded program that began seven years ago. CHIBE played a lead role in the initiative whose goal was to explore the ways behavioral economics principles might be applied to health-related behaviors.


CHIBE Holds Largest-Ever Penn-CMU Roybal Retreat & Conference

Source: Penn LDI eMagazine, November 2, 2016

On October 27 and 28, 2016, CHIBE held its ninth and largest-ever retreat of scientists collaborating through its ongoing NIH P30 Center of Excellence Roybal research program. The Penn-CMU Roybal Center is a partnership between the Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics (CHIBE) at the Leonard Davis Institute and CMU's Center for Behavioral and Decision Research (CBDR). Also attending were affiliated scientists from Harvard, Johns Hopkins, Duke, NYU, Fordham, Rutgers and Case Western.


Conditions Worse Than Death as Rated by the Seriously Ill

Source: The Economist, WHYY, WBUR, Fox News, Philly.com, Medscape, LDI Health Policy$ense, Live Science, August 1, 2016

Research from CHIBE's Fostering Improvement in End-of-Life Decision Science (FIELDS) program was highlighted in The Economist after the publication of a JAMA Internal Medicine article entitled, "States Worse Than Death Among Hospitalized Patients with Serious Illnesses."

The magazine wrote: "Asking people approaching, or threatened with death, how they feel about it, and the moment at which they would like it to come, is a welcome development. Both sides of the doctor-assisted-dying debate should pay attention to it."


Making End-of-life Care More Scientific

Source: Philadelphia Inquirer, May 22, 2016

The Philadelphia Inquirer featured an article on the FIELDS program, highlighting their current studies and recent publications. FIELDS is " the country's only program devoted to applying the principles of behavioral economics, in essence the study of how people make choices, to end-of-life care," says director Scott Halpern.


Volpp, Asch and Halpern Lead New 'NEJM Catalyst' Advisory Committee

 Source: LDI News, May 11, 2016

NEJM Catalyst has appointed national "Lead Advisors" and a committee of "Thought Leaders" in three areas of healthcare delivery. Kevin Volpp was chosen as the Lead Advisor for the Patient Engagement core and David Asch and Scott Halpern were chosen as two of the seven Thought Leaders. The core participated in the NEJM Catalyst Event Patient Engagement: Behavioral Strategies for Better Health at the University of Pennsylvania on February 25, 2016.


Changing EHR Default Options Increases Generic Prescribing

Source: Medical Express, May 9, 2016 

A study published in JAMA Internal Medicine, led by Mitesh Patel, found that a change to prescription default options in electronic medical records immediately increased generic prescribing rates from 75 percent to 98 percent. Patel commented "Our results demonstrate that default options are a powerful tool for influencing physician behaviors but that they have to be well-designed to achieve the intended goals."


How Defaults Can be Used to Improve Cancer Care

Source: Medscape, March 3, 2016

An article published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, authored by Eric Ojerholm, Scott Halpern and Justin Bekelman, explores what defaults are, why they work, and how they could be used to improve quality and value in oncology. The article includes three examples in which a default option could be useful clinically.


NEJM Catalyst Patient Engagement Seminar

Source: New England Journal of Medicine Catalyst, February 25, 2016

CHIBE hosted a free web event, produced by NEJM catalyst focused on improving the quality and value of health care through patient engagement. Ten preeminent business and clinical experts with in-depth knowledge of psychology, habit formation, behavioral economics, social marketing, and benefit design (several from CHIBE) shared their perspectives on ways to change patients’ health behavior that are scalable and usable across a wide range of clinical contexts.


Randomized Trial of Four Financial-Incentive Programs for Smoking Cessation

Sources: New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, Reuters, NBC News, CBS News, Fox NewsThe Guardian, Los Angeles Times, TIME, The Philadelphia Inquirer, Huffington Post, US News & World Report, Business StandardNPR, ABC, Tech Times, Yahoo Finance, The Business JournalsKnowledge@WhartonLDI Health Economist, May 13, 2015

A study led by Scott Halpern, recently published in the New England Journal of Medicine, compared five smoking cessation techniques in 2,538 employees of CVS, along with their friends and relatives. The study found that many more people signed up to a program that offered them an $800 reward than one that threatened them with losing a $150 deposit and only offered a $650 reward. However, those in the penalty program were twice as likely to quit.

"We found that those programs that first required people to deposit $150 of their own money were less acceptable to people than programs that were pure rewards," Halpern said.

"However, among those who would have accepted either program, the deposit-based programs were twice as effective as the rewards-based programs and five times more effective than the standard of care which was provision of free access to behavior modification therapy and nicotine replacement therapy."         

Cass Sunstein, director of The Program on Behavioral Economics and Public Policy at Harvard Law School, compared the penalty program to taxes in an editorial for the New England Journal of Medicine. 

Based on the results, "CVS Health is rolling out a campaign called '700 Good Reasons,'" Halpern said. "Instead of requiring a $150 deposit, it will require a $50 up-front deposit. If people are abstinent at 6 and 12 months, they'll not only get their $50 back but get an additional $700. Because they'll still have some skin in the game, it should be fairly effective."


Scott Halpern Elected to American Society for Clinical Investigation

Source: The American Society for Clinical Investigation, May 12, 2015

Scott Halpern has been elected to membership in the American Society For Clinical Investigation (ASCI), a century-old medical honors society that  supports the research work of physician-scientists. New members were announced and inducted by the ASCI Council at the organization's annual meeting in Chicago. Nomination and election to ASCI membership is based on the career accomplishment of "meritorious original, creative and independent investigations in the clinical and allied sciences of medicine."


Scott Halpern Awarded a UH2/UH3 Grant to Study Default Palliative Care Consultations

Scott Halpern has been awarded a five-year, $3.17 grant from the National Institute on Aging (NIA) to  conduct a pragmatic randomized trial among seriously ill patients admitted to nine electronically integrated hospitals within the largest nonprofit health system in the U.S. The study will investigate the effectiveness of changing the current “opt-in” approach for palliative care consultations in the ICU to an “opt-out” model.  In addition, the study will provide experimental evidence regarding the effectiveness of inpatient palliative care consult services in real-world settings, and will also gauge which types of services work best for certain types of patients.


NEJM Perspective Roundtable: Avoiding Low-Value Care

Source: New England Journal of Medicine, April 3, 2014

Scott Halpern joins Carrie Colla of Dartmouth and Bruce Landon of Harvard in a NEJM Perspective Roundtable moderated by Harvard's Atul Gawande to address the problem of low-value care and discuss how physicians can work with patients to make appropriate choices regarding "low-value" interventions.


Increased Risks After Kidney Donation Very Low

Source: Los Angeles Times, February 12, 2014

A recent study in JAMA assessed the absolute risk a kidney donor faces after the operation and the added risk incurred as a result of it. Although the added risks from donating a kidney are very low, Scott Halpern comments that "people are notoriously bad" at weighing increased risks of unwanted outcomes against a very low probability that it will ever happen. He also offers that in order to help prospective donors make the right decision, transplant surgeons should ask them to focus on how low the probability of the poor outcome is to begin with.


Study Finds Busy ICU's Discharge Patients More Efficiently

Source: Penn Medicine News, September 30, 2013

A recent study conducted by Scott Halpern and Jason Wagner dispels the notion that resource-strained ICUs will ration critical care resources and negatively affect patient care. They found that when ICUs were at their busiest, patients were discharged more quickly, without affecting patient outcomes. This study was published in the October issue of Annals of Internal Medicine.


Scott Halpern Named Institute of Medicine Anniversary Fellow

FIELDS Director Scott Halpern has been named an Institute of Medicine (IOM) Anniversary Fellow for a two-year term during which he will serve on an expert study committee and participate in other health and science policy work.

According to IOM President Harvey Fineberg, this year's four Anniversary Fellows were selected for their professional qualifications, reputations as scholars, professional accomplishments, and relevance of current field expertise to the work of the IOM. The IOM provides nonpartisan, evidence-based guidance to national, state and local policymakers, academic leaders, health care administrators and the public


Scott Halpern Named IOM Anniversary Fellow

Source: Institute of Medicine, August 1, 2013; Penn Medicine News

Scott Halpern has been named an Institute of Medicine (IOM) Anniversary Fellow for a two-year term during which he will serve on an expert study committee and participate in other health and science policy work. He is one of four Anniversary Fellows that were selected for their professional qualifications, reputations as scholars, professional accomplishments, and relevance of current field expertise to the work of the IOM.


Using Behavioral Economic Insights to Advance Population Health

Source: The Commonwealth Fund, June 27, 2013

Kevin Volpp and Scott Halpern discuss how insights from behavioral economics can improve the health of the population. Volpp offers that interventions that combine telemedicine and behavioral nudges can strengthen traditional care approaches while Scott Halpern speaks to decision fatigue and the importance of framing.


Changing the Lung Transplant Waitlist Rule

Source: ABC News, June 10, 2013; CBS News, June 12, 2013

On a 6ABC news segment covering the lung transplant waiting list rule, Scott Halpern offered his thoughts on the ramifications of the decision to overturn the current rule that keeps children under 12 from qualifying for adult lungs. He commented that we may not "want judges making medical decisions any more than we want doctors deciding Supreme Court cases" and pointed out that “every child under the age of 12 who gets an adult lung, that’s someone else, probably a child who is 13 or 14, who is not getting that lung.”


Default Options Influence End-Of-Life-Care Preferences

Source: Penn Medicine News, February 4, 2013

A new study comparing different types of advanced directives conducted by Scott Halpern finds that while most seriously ill patients prefer comfort-oriented care, the default option that was checked on their advance directive dramatically influenced their choice. Halpern comments that this finding makes sense because patients can't be expected to have deep-seated preferences about choices that are rarely encountered and difficult to contemplate.


Scott Halpern Receives RWJF Young Leader Award

Source: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, October 25, 2012; LDI News, October 25, 2012; Penn Medicine News, October 25, 2012; Health Affairs, November 22, 2012

Scott Halpern is honored as one of ten recipients of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's first ever RWJF Young Leader Awards. This award recognizes leaders under 40 for their exceptional contributions to improving the nation's health care.

"During the relatively short period that our foundation has been operational, these impressive men and women were born and raised and started doing amazing things that can potentially improve the health of all Americans. We're proud to acknowledge their early success, and inspired by the potential they have to improve U.S. health and health care." states the President and CEO of the foundation.