Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics News Archive

You are viewing 145 posts with the tag Kevin Volpp

Making Weight Loss Behavior Change Stick

Source: Forbes, January 31, 2017

In a Forbes piece, Duke University's Peter Ubel cites experiments by Kevin Volpp studying the impact of lotteries and regret avoidance on weight loss behaviors. Ubel argues that further research is needed to understand how these changes in behavior can be extended for long-lasting weight loss.

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Kevin Volpp: How to Keep Your Fitness New Year's Resolution Without Breaking the Bank

Source: New York Magazine, January 6, 2017

New York Magazine interviews CHIBE Director Kevin Volpp, MD, PhD for evidence-based tips on sticking to fitness and weight loss goals in the New Year. Volpp tells the magazine: "When it comes to forming a habit, enjoyment is more significant than how much money you spend. The money can be well-spent or not well-spent depending on whether you persist in the activity you’re paying for.”

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CHIBE Behavioral Economics Symposium Closes Seven-Year Research Program

Source: LDI eMagazine, January 3, 2017

The University of Pennsylvania LDI Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics' 2016 Behavioral Economics and Health Symposium was both a spotlight on the latest research work as well as the conclusion of a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Donaghue Foundation funded program that began seven years ago. CHIBE played a lead role in the initiative whose goal was to explore the ways behavioral economics principles might be applied to health-related behaviors.


CHIBE's Academic Home Launches Penn's First Online Master's Degree

Source: Penn Medicine News, November 30, 2016

The Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy at the Perelman School of Medicine has announced the launch of a new online Master of Health Care Innovation - the first online Master's degree at the University of Pennsylvania.

The degree program is an initiative to address the rapidly changing health care landscape by advancing innovation among mid-career health care professionals worldwide.  A selective cohort will engage in an 18-month program of online education led by faculty from the Perelman School of Medicine, the Wharton School, the Law School, and the Nursing School, including CHIBE Director Kevin Volpp. The program will also include two week-long sessions in Philadelphia. Learn more at www.med.upenn.edu/ethics-and-policy-online

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Why Aren't More Doctors Using Patient Engagement Tools?

Source: Medical Economics, November 9, 2016

Modern Medicine reports on a new study by CHIBE Director Kevin Volpp, MD, PhD, showing that 69 percent of health care providers are using patient engagement to get patients more involved in their own care, while that number should be closer to 100 percent. "Achieving sustained behavioral change requires doctors to be involved in the day-to-day lives of their patients, not just during the patient’s appointments—and the most effective way doctors can do this is by utilizing patient engagement tools,” Volpp says.

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Kevin Volpp Research Cited in Medical Resident Work Hour Debate

Source: Forbes, November, 8, 2016

A Forbes article addresses an ongoing debate around work hour limits imposed on medical and surgical residents and cites a 2012 study led by CHIBE Director, Kevin Volpp, MD, PhD, which found that cognitive performance of residents increased with protected sleep times.

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CHIBE Holds Largest-Ever Penn-CMU Roybal Retreat & Conference

Source: Penn LDI eMagazine, November 2, 2016

On October 27 and 28, 2016, CHIBE held its ninth and largest-ever retreat of scientists collaborating through its ongoing NIH P30 Center of Excellence Roybal research program. The Penn-CMU Roybal Center is a partnership between the Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics (CHIBE) at the Leonard Davis Institute and CMU's Center for Behavioral and Decision Research (CBDR). Also attending were affiliated scientists from Harvard, Johns Hopkins, Duke, NYU, Fordham, Rutgers and Case Western.


Short-Term Incentives Yield Longer-Term Healthful Eating Habits in Children

Source: The Wall Street Journal, Fox5NY, October 17, 2016

In a study published in the Journal of Health Economics this year, George Loewenstein, Joseph Price and Kevin Volpp presented findings from a field experiment testing whether short-run incentives can create habit formation in children. Over a 3- or 5-week period, students received an incentive for eating a serving of fruits or vegetables during lunch. The study found that providing small incentives doubled the fraction of children eating at least one serving of fruits or vegetables. Two months after the end of the intervention, the consumption rate at schools remained 21% above baseline for the 3-week treatment and 44% above baseline for the 5-week treatment. These findings indicate that short-run incentives can produce changes in behavior that persist after incentives are removed.


CHIBE Forges Research Partnership with National University of Singapore

Source: Penn LDI eMagazine, August 2016

Penn LDI reports: "In a new international partnership, the University of Pennsylvania's LDI Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics (CHIBE) and the National University of Singapore (NUS) will jointly conduct a series of behavioral economics studies.

CHIBE Director Kevin Volpp said 'The similarity between the issues faced in Singapore and in the US in terms of switches in provider payment toward value and concerns about the role of non-communicable diseases such as obesity and diabetes as a major driver of health costs and poor outcomes is remarkable. We are excited about the possibility of this collaboration.'

The new CHIBE/NUS project will launch a number of pilot studies in various areas of population health including better management of diabetes, medication adherence, the promotion of healthier lifestyles, and the use of wearable monitoring devices for chronic disease management."


Patients More Likely to Take Medications When Refills are Synced

Source: Kaiser Health News, Science Daily, Specialty Pharmacy Times, Long-Term Living Magazine, The BulletinPenn Medicine News, August 8, 2016

A CHIBE study published today in Health Affairs found that a refill synchronization program – in which patients received all prescription refills at the same time – increased medication adherence by an average of three to five percent compared to a control group. Researchers found that refill synchronization had the greatest impact on patients who were least likely to take their medication before the intervention, increasing medication adherence in this subgroup by nine to thirteen percent over the control group. “The logistical challenges involved with keeping track of remaining pills and obtaining timely refills and renewals are magnified for patients who need to take multiple medications, and often create an obstacle to medication adherence,” said lead author Jalpa A. Doshi, PhD. The results of the study suggest that syncing prescription refills may be an effective strategy for reducing these obstacles.


Employee Exercise Increases with Competition and Financial Incentives

Source: Live Science, Penn Medicine News, July 15, 2016

A new CHIBE research study published in American Journal of Health Promotion found that comparing performance to average peers and offering financial incentives was the most effective method for increasing physical activity among teams of employees. "Many employers are using workplace competitions and financial incentives to encourage physical activity and other healthy behaviors among their employees," says Mitesh Patel, MD, MBA, MS, lead author of the study. The research team's findings demonstrate that these efforts can be successful when behavioral economics principles are applied.


Using Science to Make Good Health Choices

Source: NPR. July 7, 2016

NPR health news featured research that can raise the odds of making positive behavior changes. Kevin Volpp discusses the use of commitment contracts and Katherine Milkman's "temptation bundling" concept was also mentioned.


Kevin Volpp Comments on IBC Workplace Walking Study

Source: Reuters, July 7, 2016

Researchers at Independence Blue Cross compared workplace walking programs with and without "enhanced" features and found participants in the enhanced programs logged more steps, lost more weight and reported more improvement in energy and mood. Kevin Volpp commented that "it’s hard to know which part of the program was really the key ingredient to improvement. The challenge with these interventions is to disentangle the pieces of the intervention, to figure out which components, like feedback and incentives, had an impact.”

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Financial Value of Wearable Devices

Source: Money Magazine, June 22, 2016

Money Magazine’s Get Healthy, Get Wealthy issue features Kevin Volpp's research on the role wearable fitness devices play in motivating people to start or improve an exercise routine. Wearable devices can be helpful if they spark an exercise habit, Volpp says, but “once the novelty wears off, many people stop using them.”

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Volpp and Asch Receive AcademyHealth Article of the Year Award for "Effect of Financial Incentives on Lipid Levels"

Source: AcademyHealth, June 14, 2016

AcademyHealth Announced their 2016 Annual Research Meeting Award Recipients. Kevin Volpp and David Asch received the Article-of-the-Year Award for "Effect of Financial Incentives to Physicians, Patients, or Both on Lipid Levels: A Randomized Clinical Trial."

The Article-of-the-Year Award recognizes the best scientific work that the fields of health services research and health policy have produced and published during the previous calendar year. The award-winning article provides new insights into the delivery of health care and advances the knowledge of the field. 


Volpp, Asch and Halpern Lead New 'NEJM Catalyst' Advisory Committee

 Source: LDI News, May 11, 2016

NEJM Catalyst has appointed national "Lead Advisors" and a committee of "Thought Leaders" in three areas of healthcare delivery. Kevin Volpp was chosen as the Lead Advisor for the Patient Engagement core and David Asch and Scott Halpern were chosen as two of the seven Thought Leaders. The core participated in the NEJM Catalyst Event Patient Engagement: Behavioral Strategies for Better Health at the University of Pennsylvania on February 25, 2016.


Changing EHR Default Options Increases Generic Prescribing

Source: Medical Express, May 9, 2016 

A study published in JAMA Internal Medicine, led by Mitesh Patel, found that a change to prescription default options in electronic medical records immediately increased generic prescribing rates from 75 percent to 98 percent. Patel commented "Our results demonstrate that default options are a powerful tool for influencing physician behaviors but that they have to be well-designed to achieve the intended goals."


Drawing the Line between Paternalism and Patient-Centered Care

Source: NEJM Catalyst, March 25, 2016

Where do we draw the line between improving people’s health behavior in the direction that we want, versus leaving them happy with what they have? Kevin Volpp, David Kirchhoff, and Wendy Wood discuss how much providers should let patients drive what happens (patient-centered care), and when it might make sense to be more paternalistic. This segment is taken from the NEJM Catalyst event Patient Engagement: Behavioral Strategies for Better Health 

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Improving Patient Engagement

Source: NEJM Catalyst, March 7, 2016

As Lead Advisor for the Patient Engagement theme on NEJM Catalyst, Kevin Volpp kicks off an ongoing series of articles, case studies, interviews, and other contributions from leaders dedicated to improving patient engagement. 

His first blog post discusses patient engagement and behavioral insights. He summarizes that the key to designing a better health care system is to recognize that what patients want is to be healthy, not consume health services.

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New York Times Op-Ed: Paying Employees to Lose Weight

Source: The New York Times, March 4, 2016

Mitesh Patel, David Asch and Kevin Volpp authored an Op-Ed in The New York Times about the effectiveness of workplace wellness programs based on recent research they've published. Their research suggests that financial incentives can work well for employee wellness programs, but only if they are separated from insurance premiums.