Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics News Archive

You are viewing 4 posts with the tag Justin Bekelman

How Defaults Can be Used to Improve Cancer Care

Source: Medscape, March 3, 2016

An article published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, authored by Eric Ojerholm, Scott Halpern and Justin Bekelman, explores what defaults are, why they work, and how they could be used to improve quality and value in oncology. The article includes three examples in which a default option could be useful clinically.


Justin Bekelman Awarded PCORI Grant

Source: Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, April 22, 2015

Justin Bekelman, MD, Assistant Professor of Radiation Oncology at the medical school and CHIBE affiliated faculty member, will receive $11.9 million for a five-year study comparing the short and long-term effects of Proton versus Photon radiation therapy for patients with stage II or III breast cancer.

A consortium of 20 academic and community practice radiation therapy centers and related professional groups will conduct a randomized clinical trial in which 1,716 patients with stage II and II breast cancer involving lymph nodes under the arm or above the collarbone will receive after-surgery Proton or Photon therapy. Patients will be followed to determine differences in subsequent heart problems, cancer control and health-related quality of life measures.


Radiation Plus Hormone Therapy Prolongs Survival for Older Men with Prostate Cancer

Sources: Penn Medicine News, CBS Philly, Yahoo! News, Renal and Urology News January 6, 2014

A new study led by Justin Bekelman in the Journal of Clinical Oncology found that hormone therapy plus radiation reduced cancer deaths by nearly 50 percent in men aged 76 to 85 compared to men who only received hormone therapy. Bekelman advises patients and their physicians to "carefully discuss curative treatment options for prostate cancer and reduce the use of hormone therapy alone.”    


Many Breast Cancer Patients Receive Unnecessarily Long Courses of Radiation

Sources: Penn Medicine News, The New York Times, Time, USA Today, NBC News, December 10, 2014

A study published in JAMA authored by researchers Justin Bekelman and Zeke Emanuel found that two-thirds of women treated for early-stage breast cancer in the U.S. receive longer radiation therapy than necessary. The vast majority of women who undergo lumpectomies receive six to seven weeks of radiation therapy, despite multiple randomized trials and professional society guidelines showing that three weeks of radiation is just as clinically effective, more convenient, and less costly.