Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics News Archive

You are viewing 5 posts with the tag Eric Van Epps

CHIBE Behavioral Economics Symposium Closes Seven-Year Research Program

Source: LDI eMagazine, January 3, 2017

The University of Pennsylvania LDI Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics' 2016 Behavioral Economics and Health Symposium was both a spotlight on the latest research work as well as the conclusion of a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Donaghue Foundation funded program that began seven years ago. CHIBE played a lead role in the initiative whose goal was to explore the ways behavioral economics principles might be applied to health-related behaviors.


Warning Labels May Discourage Teens from Purchasing Sugary Drinks

Source: Forbes, New York Daily News, Philly.com, U.S. News & World ReportKnowledge@Wharton Radio, Times of India, American Heart Association, Nutrition Insight, Penn Medicine News, Health Day, Daily Mail, Healthy Food America, PreventObesity.Net, ElEconomista.es, Pourqui DocteurAJMC, India TV News, Medical Xpress, Beverage Daily, LDI Health Policy$ense, September 8, 2016

Teens are more than 15 percent less likely to say they would purchase soft drinks and other sugary drinks that include health warning labels, according to a new CHIBE study conducted by Christina Roberto, PhD and Eric Van Epps, PhD of the Psychology of Eating and Consumer Health Lab. The study, published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, is among the first to examine how warning labels on sugary drinks influence teens, and builds upon research published by the team earlier this year which showed that parents were less likely to select sugary beverages for their kids when labels warning about the dangers of added sugar – which can contribute to obesity, diabetes and tooth decay – were present.


CHIBE Forges Research Partnership with National University of Singapore

Source: Penn LDI eMagazine, August 2016

Penn LDI reports: "In a new international partnership, the University of Pennsylvania's LDI Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics (CHIBE) and the National University of Singapore (NUS) will jointly conduct a series of behavioral economics studies.

CHIBE Director Kevin Volpp said 'The similarity between the issues faced in Singapore and in the US in terms of switches in provider payment toward value and concerns about the role of non-communicable diseases such as obesity and diabetes as a major driver of health costs and poor outcomes is remarkable. We are excited about the possibility of this collaboration.'

The new CHIBE/NUS project will launch a number of pilot studies in various areas of population health including better management of diabetes, medication adherence, the promotion of healthier lifestyles, and the use of wearable monitoring devices for chronic disease management."


Ordering Food in Advance Leads to Healthier Choices

Source: New York Times, Consumer Reports, Science Alert, New York Magazine, July 25, 2016

The New York Times profiled CHIBE's study, "Advance Ordering for Healthier Eating? Field Experiments on the Relationship Between the Meal Order–Consumption Time Delay and Meal Content," recently published in the Journal of Marketing Research.

CHIBE Postdoctoral Fellow Eric VanEpps told the Times, "If a decision is going to be implemented immediately, we just care about the immediate consequences, and we discount the long-term costs and benefits. In the case of food, we care about what’s happening right now – like how tasty it is – but discount the long-term costs of an unhealthy meal.”


“Traffic-light” and Numeric Calorie Labels Cut Calorie Consumption

Sources: Penn Medicine NewsUS News & World Report, Huffington Post, CBS Philly, Tech Times, New Hampshire Voice, June 17, 2016

A recent study published in the the Journal of Public Policy & Marketing by CHIBE Postdoctoral Fellow Eric VanEpps and colleagues at Carnegie Mellon University, involving online workplace lunch orders, found that each of three types of calorie labeling conditions – numbers alone, traffic lights alone, or both labels together – reduced calories ordered by about 10 percent, compared to orders involving no calorie labels. “The similar effects of traffic light and numeric labeling suggests to us that consumers are making decisions based more on which choices seem healthier than on absolute calorie numbers,” VanEpps said.