Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics News Archive

You are viewing 51 posts with the tag David Asch

CHIBE Holds Largest-Ever Penn-CMU Roybal Retreat & Conference

Source: Penn LDI eMagazine, November 2, 2016

On October 27 and 28, 2016, CHIBE held its ninth and largest-ever retreat of scientists collaborating through its ongoing NIH P30 Center of Excellence Roybal research program. The Penn-CMU Roybal Center is a partnership between the Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics (CHIBE) at the Leonard Davis Institute and CMU's Center for Behavioral and Decision Research (CBDR). Also attending were affiliated scientists from Harvard, Johns Hopkins, Duke, NYU, Fordham, Rutgers and Case Western.


Employee Exercise Increases with Competition and Financial Incentives

Source: Live Science, Penn Medicine News, July 15, 2016

A new CHIBE research study published in American Journal of Health Promotion found that comparing performance to average peers and offering financial incentives was the most effective method for increasing physical activity among teams of employees. "Many employers are using workplace competitions and financial incentives to encourage physical activity and other healthy behaviors among their employees," says Mitesh Patel, MD, MBA, MS, lead author of the study. The research team's findings demonstrate that these efforts can be successful when behavioral economics principles are applied.


Volpp and Asch Receive AcademyHealth Article of the Year Award for "Effect of Financial Incentives on Lipid Levels"

Source: AcademyHealth, June 14, 2016

AcademyHealth Announced their 2016 Annual Research Meeting Award Recipients. Kevin Volpp and David Asch received the Article-of-the-Year Award for "Effect of Financial Incentives to Physicians, Patients, or Both on Lipid Levels: A Randomized Clinical Trial."

The Article-of-the-Year Award recognizes the best scientific work that the fields of health services research and health policy have produced and published during the previous calendar year. The award-winning article provides new insights into the delivery of health care and advances the knowledge of the field. 


Volpp, Asch and Halpern Lead New 'NEJM Catalyst' Advisory Committee

 Source: LDI News, May 11, 2016

NEJM Catalyst has appointed national "Lead Advisors" and a committee of "Thought Leaders" in three areas of healthcare delivery. Kevin Volpp was chosen as the Lead Advisor for the Patient Engagement core and David Asch and Scott Halpern were chosen as two of the seven Thought Leaders. The core participated in the NEJM Catalyst Event Patient Engagement: Behavioral Strategies for Better Health at the University of Pennsylvania on February 25, 2016.


Leveraging Behavioral Insights to Promote Vaccine Acceptance

Source: JAMA Pediatrics, May 9, 2016 

A JAMA viewpoint article authored by Alison Buttenheim and David Asch identifies several interventions that use behavioral economics to increase vaccine acceptance. These interventions recognize common biases as well as people’s tendency to respond to social cues and salient information.


When - and How - Can Incentives Actually Work?

Source: NEJM Catalyst, March 7, 2016

A lot of incentives programs don’t work, but they can if they’re designed just a little bit better, says David Asch. He and NEJM Catalyst’s Tom Lee sat down to discuss how financial incentives really can work to engage people in healthy behavior, and Asch discusses how things have changed since publishing several key articles in The New England Journal of Medicine.

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New York Times Op-Ed: Paying Employees to Lose Weight

Source: The New York Times, March 4, 2016

Mitesh Patel, David Asch and Kevin Volpp authored an Op-Ed in The New York Times about the effectiveness of workplace wellness programs based on recent research they've published. Their research suggests that financial incentives can work well for employee wellness programs, but only if they are separated from insurance premiums.


NEJM Catalyst Patient Engagement Seminar

Source: New England Journal of Medicine Catalyst, February 25, 2016

CHIBE hosted a free web event, produced by NEJM catalyst focused on improving the quality and value of health care through patient engagement. Ten preeminent business and clinical experts with in-depth knowledge of psychology, habit formation, behavioral economics, social marketing, and benefit design (several from CHIBE) shared their perspectives on ways to change patients’ health behavior that are scalable and usable across a wide range of clinical contexts.


"Wearable Devices as Facilitators of Health Behavior Change" Among Top 5 JAMA Articles of 2015

Source: Center for Health Care Innovation,  December 30, 2015

"Wearable Devices as Facilitators, Not Drivers, of Health Behavior Change," an article written by Mitesh Patel, David Asch and Kevin Volpp was named one of the top five most popular articles of 2015 by the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). According to Altmetric, the article was viewed more than 40,000 times, covered by 15 news outlets, tweeted about by 992 Twitter users and mentioned on 58 Facebook pages.


New York Times Article on Wearable Devices Highlights JAMA Op-Ed Piece by Mitesh Patel

Source: The New York Times, November 16, 2015 

A New York Times Article entitled "Assessing the Fitness of Wearable Tech" highlighted an opinion piece featured in the Journal of the American Medical Association written by Mitesh Patel along with David Asch and Kevin Volpp.   


Effect of Financial Incentives on Lipid Levels

Sources: JAMAThe Philadelphia Inquirer, CBS News, US News & World ReportHealthDay, Newsworks, MedPage Today, LDI, AJMC, UK News, Endocrinology Advisor, Food World News, Daily Mail, Yahoo Finance, Health Medicine Network, American Pharmacists' Association, Entertainmentwise, Health Insurance & Protection Daily, November 12, 2015.

A recent study led by Dr. David Asch and Dr. Kevin Volpp, published in JAMA, found that providing financial incentives to both primary care physicians and patients leads to a greater reduction in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol in patients than paying only the physician or only the patient. This was the first study to test physician-only and patient-only incentives compared to incentives shared by patients and physicians. The study used the Way to Health Platform to enroll 340 physicians and 1,503 patients.


Recent Washington Post Article Highlights HeartStrong Study

Source: The Washington Post, September 5, 2015

A recent Washington Post article, featuring David Asch, highlighted CHIBE's HeartStrong Study. The study, funded by the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare, is currently testing new ways to motivate medication adherence - including greater involvement from friends and family in supporting adherence and the possibility to win daily financials incentives when successfully adhering to prescribed medication regiments.


Why Doctors Still Perform Unnecessary Medical Tests

Source: US News & World Report, May 27, 2015

A recent Health Affairs article, authored by David Asch and Peter Ubel, offers psychological explanations for why it is difficult for clinicians to "'de-innovate,' or give up old practices, even when new evidence reveals that those practices offer little value." To overcome the resistance to de-innovation, Asch and Ubel recommended that the task force's guideline development committees be made up of medical experts from a wide variety of domains with different clinical expertise so that they can cancel out each other's conformation bias.

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How Physicians Can Use Behavioral Economics to Improve Patient Care

Source: GI & Hepatology News, March 20, 2015

In an interview at the 2015 AGA Tech Summit, David Asch discusses how physicians can incorporate the principles of behavioral economics into their practices to improve patient care.

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How Wearable Devices Can Effectively Promote Health Behavior Change

Sources: Penn News, The Atlantic, NY Daily News, Philadelphia Magazine, Shape.com, January 8, 2014

A JAMA Viewpoint article authored by Mitesh Patel, Kevin Volpp and David Asch describes why wearable devices alone don't drive behavior change. They offer that the potential health benefits depend more on the design of the engagement strategies than on the features of their technology.


Using Behavioral Economics to Achieve Wellness Goals

Source: Harvard Business Review, December 1, 2014

A Harvard Business Review article by David Asch and Kevin Volpp encourages the adoption of behavioral economics approaches for wellness programs. Specific suggestions for implementation include: smaller incentives that are easy to find, constructing teams whose success depends on each member achieving a goal and turning repetitive activities into a daily game.


Kevin Volpp and David Asch Receive Clinical Innovator Award

Source: Penn Medicine News, October 10, 2014

Kevin Volpp and David Asch were two recipients of the Penn Medicine Awards of Excellence. The awardees exemplify the profession's highest values of scholarship and teaching, innovation, commitment to service, leadership, and dedication to patient care. 


What Health Systems Can Learn From the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge

Source: Philadelphia Inquirer, August 21, 2014

A Philadelphia Inquirer article authored by David Asch, Roy Rosin and Raina Merchant reflects on why the ALS ice bucket challenge went viral and what health systems working on topics ranging from vaccinations and colorectal screening can learn from the campaign.


Innovation in Medical Education

Sources:  Penn Medicine News, WHYY Newsworks, July 30,  2014

Coinciding with the IOM's report on the governance and financing of medical education, David Asch proposes recommendations for the future of medical education in a Perspective piece in the New England Journal of Medicine. The recommendations include defining better measures of training success, testing fundamental changes to the structure and content of medical education and testing new approaches for financing medical education.


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Changing Roles of Physicians With MBA's

Source: Penn Medicine News, June 26, 2014

A recent study conducted by David Asch, Mitesh Patel and colleagues found that physician graduates from the MBA program in heath care management at Penn’s Wharton School report that their dual training had a positive effect on their individual careers and professional lives. Lead author Mitesh Patel commented that “Our findings may have significant implications for current and future physician-managers as the landscape of health care continues to change.”